Nov 26, 2022  
2020-2021 Academic Catalog and Student Handbook 
    
2020-2021 Academic Catalog and Student Handbook [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Art

  
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    ART 2125 - Graphic Design Concepts (3CR)


    (2L, 4LB) This course examines complex and multi-faceted commercial design problems as a means of developing dynamic and innovative solutions. Design projects are analyzed according to their conceptual and graphic composition, and are developed to effectively and creatively communication a message to a specific audience. May be taken concurrently with Graphic Design Solutions.

    Concurrently: ART 2110 , ART 2112  and ART ART 2122 .
  
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    ART 2130 - Graphic Design Solutions (3CR)


    (2L, 4LB) This course offers students further exploration of concept development and the language of symbols combined with further exploration into the aesthetic issues of type. Emphasis will be placed on content, form and technique for effective use of graphic design and typography in ads, posters, newsletters, desktop publishing and other visual communications.

    Prerequisites: ART 2112  and a working knowledge of current software.
  
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    ART 2141 - Professional Practice in the Arts (1CR)


    (1L) This seminar will focus on practical aspects of artistic practice such as preparing a professional portfolio and resume, generating an exhibition, understanding careers in art and preparing work for museum and/or gallery consideration. This course is required of all art majors.

  
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    ART 2210 - Painting I (3CR)


    (2L, 4LB) [E] An introductory painting course presenting a variety of methods and subjects.

    Prerequisites: ART 1005 .
  
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    ART 2220 - Painting II (3CR)


    (2L, 4LB) [E] An intermediate painting course presenting a variety of methods and subjects.

    Prerequisites: ART 2210  
  
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    ART 2230 - Painting III (3CR)


    (2L, 4LB) [E] A painting course in which emphasis is on the aesthetic concepts of contemporary movements. Students are encouraged to experiment within the framework of selected projects and to explore individual ideas and broaden experience.

    Prerequisites: ART 2210 , ART 2220 , and permission of the instructor.
  
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    ART 2240 - Painting IV (3CR)


    (2L, 4LB) [E] A painting course in which emphasis is on the aesthetic concepts of contemporary movements. Students are encouraged to experiment within the framework of selected projects and to explore individual ideas and broaden experience.

    Prerequisites: ART 2210 , ART 2220 , ART 2230 , and permission of the instructor.
  
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    ART 2245 - Digital Photography I (3CR)


    (2L, 4LB) Investigation and application of some of the fundamentals of pictorial arrangement and expression within the realm of digital photography. Assignments are based on compositional problems. Some of the primary concerns are pictorial structure, balance, movement, contrast, theme, spatial relationships and color relationships. Additionally, the design and conceptual development of an assignment are emphasized coupled with high quality execution, originality and clarity of presentation.

    Prerequisites: ART 1110 - Foundation: Two-Dimensional (3CR) 
  
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    ART 2255 - Digital Photography II (3CR)


    (2L, 4LB) A continued investigation and application of some of the fundamentals of pictorial arrangement and expression within the realm of digital photography. Assignments are based on compositional problems. Some of the primary concerns are pictorial structure, balance, movement, contrast, theme, spatial relationships and color relationships. Additionally, the design and conceptual development of an assignment are emphasized coupled with high quality execution, originality and clarity of presentation.

    Prerequisites: ART 2245  or permission of instructor.
  
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    ART 2310 - Sculpture I (3CR)


    (2L, 4LB) Sculpture I introduces students to the expansive field of sculpture, while also teaching fundamental skills upon which to build a studio practice. Students learn basic woodworking, casting techniques, and conduct various material studies. This course addresses contemporary issues and promotes an atmosphere that is balanced between conceptual development and material explorations.

  
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    ART 2320 - Sculpture II (3CR)


    (2L, 4LB) This course exposes students to traditional and contemporary methods of working sculpturally. In this course, students develop a critical dialogue about sculpture and extended media while developing a personal direction in the medium. This course introduces advanced sculpture techniques, and encourages the deep exploration of ideas, techniques, and materials.

    Prerequisites: ART 1120  and ART 2310 .
  
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    ART 2341 - Sketches in Clay (3CR)


    (2L, 4LB) This is an introductory class in the fundamentals of traditional and contemporary ceramic making by means of hand building and throwing on the wheel. Students study some of the rich history and traditions of ceramics as well as developing techniques and different firing possibilities. An emphasis on sketching and journaling creative through processes before, during and after lab time has been added to the class.

    Prerequisites: None
  
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    ART 2345 - Casting (3CR)


    (2L, 4LB) This course offers a technical perspective on casting’s unique possibilities, its place in history, and its role in contemporary object creation. Casting introduces students to diverse methods of casting and mold making. Techniques needed to cast rigid and flexible molds will be addressed through a variety of assignments and sample-based experiments. Students will have the opportunity to cast a variety of materials while being inspired to create concept-driven work in the sculptural format.

    Prerequisites: ART 1120  and ART 2310  or permission of the instructor.
  
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    ART 2350 - Metalsmithing I (3CR)


    (2L, 4LB) This course serves as an introduction to the fabrication of non-ferrous metals. In this course, students will engage with materials, techniques, and craft while focusing on innovation and experimentation. This technical approach will include an investigation into the rich history of metalsmithing in conjunction with that application of contemporary techniques. Career development and professional practice skills are an integral part of the curriculum.

  
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    ART 2360 - Metalsmithing II (3CR)


    (2L, 4LB) This course expands the potential of working with non-ferrous metal through the introduction of various methods of casting, fabricating, and stone setting. Throughout the semester, students will work to develop technical skills while developing a personal direction in the medium. This course encourages a deep exploration of ideas and materials. Career development and professional practice skills are an integral part of the curriculum.

    Prerequisites: ART 2350 .
  
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    ART 2370 - Metalsmithing III (3CR)


    (2L, 4LB) This course focuses on a combination of surface treatments and holloware fabrication processes for non-ferrous metals. Emphasis is placed on form and surface. Students are introduced to metal forming and raising through a variety of assignments and sample-based experiments. Further examination of surface treatments involving enameling, heat treatments, patination, and other diverse processes in the introduction of color on metal. Students are encouraged to explore both the jewelry and sculptural formats as they work with assignments that inspire personal imagery and conceptual ideas. Students improve their fabrication and design skills while practicing innovative experimentation and ideation.

    Prerequisites: ART 2360 .
  
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    ART 2375 - Metalsmithing IV (3CR)


    (2L, 4LB) This course focuses on diverse methods of creating forms and moveable parts in metal through complex fabrication techniques. Students investigate die forming, hinging and clasping mechanisms, tap & die processes, and anticlastic/synclastic raising through a variety of assignments and sample-based experiments. Through these techniques, students gain skills that allow for the creation of lightweight hollow forms, enclosed and moveable containers, and an array of fabrication possibilities for complex forms. Throughout the semester, students are expected to work conceptually as they combine new technologies with previously learned skills.

    Prerequisites: ART 2370 .
  
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    ART 2410 - Ceramics I (3CR)


    (2L, 4LB) [E] This is an introductory class in the fundamentals of traditional and contemporary ceramic making by means of hand building and throwing on the wheel. Students study some of the rich history and traditions of ceramics as well as decorating techniques and different firing possibilities.

  
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    ART 2420 - Ceramics II (3CR)


    (2L, 4LB) [E] This is a continuation of Ceramics I, expanding techniques of throwing on the wheel as well as hand building, with more complex assignments. Students start to learn about loading and firing kilns and take more responsibility for firing their projects.

    Prerequisites: ART 2410  or permission of the instructor.
  
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    ART 2430 - Ceramics III (3CR)


    (2L, 4LB) [E] This course offers advanced throwing on the wheel and hand building assignments with more independence in kiln firing. High temperature firing techniques and different styles of kilns become available for study.

    Prerequisites: ART 2420  or permission of the instructor.
  
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    ART 2440 - Ceramics IV (3CR)


    (2L, 4LB) [E] Students are challenged with advanced throwing or hand building assignments and are required to fire their own work with a technique best suited for the assignments.

    Prerequisites: ART 2430  or permission of the instructor.
  
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    ART 2445 - Wood Firing (1CR)


    (1LB) This is an advanced course teaching different aspects about wood firing techniques.  Focus will be on the technical skills needed to load and fire a large wood fire kiln.

    Prerequisites: Permission of instructor
  
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    ART 2470 - Art Museum Training Internship


    (1-3CR) (Max. 6) The internship gives the student exposure to museum work through first hand experience.

    Prerequisites: Student must be enrolled in the art department, permission of the instructor, and interview with Nicolaysen Art Museum staff member and instructor.
  
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    ART 2480 - Special Projects: Drawing


    (*LB,1-3CR) (Max. 6) *Laboratory to be arranged. Advanced drawing emphasizing individualized interests and projects. This course is designed for the student who has recently completed all the offered courses in a given area and still requires or wishes continued exploration of an advanced study in that area. The special projects are designed only as a continuation of previous courses, not personal endeavors of the student.

    Prerequisites: ART 1005 , ART 2050  and permission of the instructor.
  
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    ART 2481 - Special Projects: Illustration


    (1-3CR) (Max. 6) An advanced course in methods and techniques used in illustration with emphasis on developing individual style. This course is designed for the student who has recently completed all the offered courses in a given area and still requires or wishes continued exploration of an advanced study in that area. The special projects are designed only as a continuation of previous courses, not personal endeavors of the student.

    Prerequisites: ART 2076  and permission of the instructor.
  
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    ART 2482 - Special Projects: Painting


    (1-3CR) (Max. 6) An advanced painting class for the student wishing to take further painting credit with a specific instructor. This course is designed for the student who has recently completed all the offered courses in a given area and still requires or wishes continued exploration of an advanced study in that area. The special projects are designed only as a continuation of previous courses, not personal endeavors of the student.

    Prerequisites: ART 2210 , ART 2220 , and permission of the instructor.
  
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    ART 2483 - Special Projects: Printmaking


    (1-3CR) (Max. 6) Special problems in advanced relief, intaglio and monotypes, and other printmaking techniques with approval and directional guidance of the instructor. The course involves the development of a total idea and project and the completion of a portfolio of prints. This course is designed for the student who has recently completed all the offered courses in a given area and still requires or wishes continued exploration of an advanced study in that area. The special projects are designed only as a continuation of previous courses, not personal endeavors of the student.

    Prerequisites: ART 2150 , and permission of the instructor.
  
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    ART 2484 - Special Projects: Photography


    (1-3CR) (Max. 6) Students will work on special problems or projects of their own choosing with approval and directional guidance of the instructor. The course involves the development of a total idea and project and the completion of a portfolio of prints. This course is designed for the student who has recently completed all the offered courses in a given area and still requires or wishes continued exploration of an advanced study in that area. The special projects are designed only as a continuation of previous courses, not personal endeavors of the student.

    Prerequisites: ART 1160 , ART 2095 , and permission of the instructor.
  
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    ART 2485 - Special Projects: Ceramics


    (1-3CR) (Max. 6) Assignments are of the student’s choice with approval and guidance of the instructor based on credit hours. All work is done and finished at their own pace, meeting with the instructor as needed and at mid-term and finals. This course is designed for the student who has recently completed all the offered courses in a given area and still requires or wishes continued exploration of an advanced study in that area. The special projects are designed only as a continuation of previous courses, not personal endeavors of the student.

    Prerequisites: ART 2440  or permission of the instructor.
  
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    ART 2487 - Special Projects: Sculpture


    (1-3CR) (Max. 6) Special problems of the student’s own choosing with directional guidance by the instructor. Emphasis will be placed on the development of a total idea, whether it is one work or several. This course is designed for the student who has recently completed all the offered courses in a given area and still requires or wishes continued exploration of an advanced study in that area. The special projects are designed only as a continuation of previous courses, not personal endeavors of the student.

    Prerequisites: ART 2320  and permission of the instructor.
  
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    ART 2488 - Special Projects: Metals


    (1-3CR) (Max. 6) Special problems in jewelry of the student’s own choosing with directional guidance by the instructor. Emphasis on design and technical skills. This course is designed for the student who has recently completed all the offered courses in a given area and still requires or wishes continued exploration of an advanced study in that area. The special projects are designed only as a continuation of previous courses, not personal endeavors of the student.

    Prerequisites: ART 2360  and permission of the instructor.
  
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    ART 2489 - Special Projects: Graphic Design


    (1-3CR) (Max. 6) An advanced study further exploring specific design problems with emphasis on development of ideas and flexibility of approach. This course is designed for the student who has recently completed all the offered courses in a given area and still requires or wishes continued exploration of an advanced study in that area. The special projects are designed only as a continuation of previous courses, not personal endeavors of the student.

    Prerequisites: ART 2112  and permission of the instructor.
  
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    ART 2990 - Museum Training Internship (6CR)


    (18LB) This course is designed for practical experience in a museum in areas such as collections management, education, development, or exhibition design. For museum/gallery studies majors only.

    Prerequisites: ART 1300 .

Astronomy

  
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    ASTR 1000 - Descriptive Astronomy (3CR)


    (3L) [E] Designed to give a general understanding of modern astronomy. A background in historical astronomy will open the course. From there, a survey of the solar system and the objects in it will be discussed. An overview of the life and death of a star will follow. Finally, a description of the galaxy will be covered along with a study on the various theories of the origin of the universe. (Taken with ASTR 1015 , equivalent to ASTR 1050  [SE].)

  
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    ASTR 1015 - Astronomy Laboratory (1CR)


    (2LB) [E] An optional supplement to ASTR 1000  and designed to familiarize the student with tools and procedures of fundamental astronomical observations.

    Prerequisites: MATH 0920 . (Taken with ASTR 1000 , equivalent to ASTR 1050  [SE].)
  
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    ASTR 1050 - Survey of Astronomy (4CR)


    (3L, 2LB) [E] A survey of astronomy and the universe. Topics will include astronomical concepts, terms and history, as well as a study of stellar evolution, galaxies, cosmology, and the solar system. The lab is an exercise into the concepts and methods used by astronomers in their study of the universe.

    Prerequisites: MATH 0900 .
  
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    ASTR 1100 - Planets Around Stars (4CR)


    (3L, 2LB) A survey of the planets and moons of our solar system; the physical laws governing their motions; the theory of their formation and evolution to the present time. Includes comparative studies of the interiors, surfaces, and atmospheres of the planets, and comparison of our solar system to recently discovered extrasolar planets.

    Prerequisites: A grade of “C” or better in MATH 0920 . ASTR 1000  recommended.

Atmospheric Science

  
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    ATSC 2000 - Introduction to Meteorology (4CR)


    (3L, 2LB) [E] This first course in meteorology is for students with minimal background in math and science. It provides general and practical understanding of weather phenomena, and emphasizes observational aspects of the science, meteorological view of the physical world and the impact the science has on life and society. The course will include discussion of atmospheric composition and structure, radiation, winds and horizontal forces, stability and vertical motions, general circulation, synoptic meteorology, clouds and precipitation, severe storms and atmospheric optics.


Auto Body Repair

  
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    AUBR 1540 - Auto Body Welding (3CR)


    (1L, 4LB) A course in the application of basic welding techniques in replacement and repair of auto body panels.

    Prerequisites: WELD 1820  or concurrent enrollment.
  
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    AUBR 1550 - Auto Body Repair I (5CR)


    (2L, 6LB) Course covers shop and tool safety; service information and measurements; mechanical repair of power train, suspension, steering, brake, cooling, heater and air conditioning, exhaust, emission control, and fuel systems.

  
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    AUBR 1560 - Auto Body Repair II (5CR)


    (2L, 6LB) A continuation of AUBR 1550, covering the automotive electrical/electronic systems, and restraint system operation and service.

    Prerequisites: AUBR 1550 .
  
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    AUBR 1710 - Frame and Chassis I (2.5CR)


    (1L, 3LB) An introduction to frame repair including impact on its effect on a vehicle, measurement of body dimensions, unibody straightening, and realigning techniques.

    Prerequisites: AUBR 1550  and AUBR 1810 .
  
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    AUBR 1760 - Rod and Custom Restoration I (4CR)


    (2L, 4LB) Introduction to street rods and custom vehicles.  Course consists of planning and designing a custom project, fabrication techniques, paint and refinishing, external body modifications, and suspension modifications.   Bi-annually

    Prerequisites: None
  
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    AUBR 1770 - Rod and Custom Restoration II (4CR)


    (2L, 4LB) A continuation course to AUBR 1760 Rod and Custom Restoration I.   Areas of instruction will include electronics, welding metalworking, custom paint and graphics, and engine and drivetrain modifications. Bi-annually

    Prerequisites: AUBR 1760
  
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    AUBR 1810 - Collision Damage Repair I (5CR)


    (2L, 6LB) Introduction to the collision repair industry, vehicle construction technology, tool usage, materials, fasteners, working sheet metal, and the use of body fillers.

  
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    AUBR 1820 - Collision Damage Repair II (5CR)


    (2L, 6LB) A continuation of AUBR 1810 , covering the service and replacement of fenders, hoods, panels, bumpers, trim, doors, glass, and passenger compartment components.

    Prerequisites: AUBR 1810 .
  
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    AUBR 1910 - Auto Paint I (5CR)


    (2L, 6LB) A course in auto painting, with emphasis on material and equipment handling.

  
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    AUBR 1920 - Auto Paint II (5CR)


    (2L, 6LB) A continuation of AUBR 1910, stressing theoretical and practical aspects of final finishing procedures for complete car refinishing and spot repairs.

    Prerequisites: AUBR 1910 .
  
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    AUBR 1975 - Independent Study - Auto Body Repair


    (1-3CR) (Max. 6) This course provides an option for students with sufficient background to pursue special interests in the auto body lab under contract with the instructor.

    Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.
  
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    AUBR 1980 - Cooperative Work Experience


    (1-8CR) This course is designed to provide an opportunity for students with sufficient entry level auto body skills to work off-campus, in weld related areas, while attending classes on campus part-time.

    Prerequisites: Demonstrate proficiency of auto body skills, and permission of the instructor.

Automotive Technology

  
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    AUTO 1502 - Automotive Survey I (6CR)


    (2L, 8LB) For an entry level into automotive repair. For those students with little or no automotive background. Provides general theory and repair in the following automotive systems: electrical, engine performance, brakes, suspension and steering.

  
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    AUTO 1503 - Automotive Survey II (6CR)


    (2L, 8LB) A continuation of AUTO 1502  to provide third year high school students theory and exposure to the following automotive systems: engine repair and overhaul, heating and air conditioning, manual transmission, drive train and axles, and automatic transmission.

  
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    AUTO 1510 - Engine System Fundamentals (6CR)


    (2L, 8LB) This course will cover engine design and operation, engine sub-systems including ignition, fuel, cooling, oiling, intake and exhaust, and timing systems. Emphasis is placed on the proper usage of diagnostic tools and equipment, base engine diagnosis, engine performance, and tune-up procedures.

  
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    AUTO 1515 - Basic Automotive Technology (3CR)


    (1L, 4LB) This course will provide students with little or no automotive background a practical look at working in the automotive industry with general theory and repair in the areas of electrical systems, engine performance, brake systems, suspension systems, and steering systems.

  
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    AUTO 1690 - Manual Power Train Fundamentals (4CR)


    (2L, 4LB) This course is designed to provide automotive students with the general theory, operation and component service involved in the transmission of mechanical power. The primary emphasis of the course deals with an introduction to drive shafts, drive axles, clutches, manual transmissions/transaxles and four-wheel/all-wheel drive components.

  
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    AUTO 1740 - Brake Systems (4CR)


    (2L, 4LB) An introduction to braking systems, this course will cover basic theory and service of hydraulic systems, power brake systems, parking brakes, and antilock systems. Diagnostics, service and repair procedures are emphasized.

  
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    AUTO 1760 - Heating and Air Conditioning (4CR)


    (1L, 6LB) The course will cover heating and air conditioning theory, regulations, troubleshooting, component service, evacuation, recharging and retrofitting procedures.

    Prerequisites: AUTO 1510  and AUTO 1765  or permission of instructor.
  
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    AUTO 1765 - Automotive Electrical (5CR)


    (2L, 6LB) Introductory course designed to cover the theory, operation, testing and service of automotive electrical systems, battery, starting and charging systems.

  
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    AUTO 2500 - Advanced Engine Rebuilding (4CR)


    (1L, 6LB) Designed to provide students with the background and hands-on practice necessary to diagnose, repair and overhaul gasoline engines.

    Prerequisites: AUTO 1510 .
  
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    AUTO 2555 - Suspension and Steering (4CR)


    (2L, 4LB) This course is an introduction to automotive alignment and suspension, and will cover chassis and steering system components, service procedures, alignment theory, and four-wheel alignments.

  
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    AUTO 2565 - Advanced Automotive Electrical (5CR)


    (2L, 6LB) A continuation of the vehicle electrical system operation and testing, covering lighting circuits, instrumentation, accessories, body computers, electronic chassis controls and passive restraint systems.

    Prerequisites: AUTO 1765 .
  
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    AUTO 2580 - Automotive Electronic Theory (2CR)


    (2L) Intended for advanced automotive students who have a desire to increase their knowledge of basic electronics. The course is intended to provide an introduction to electronics and on-board microprocessors as they are currently used on production vehicles.

    Prerequisites: AUTO 1765 .
  
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    AUTO 2610 - Computerized Fuel Systems (5CR)


    (2L, 6LB) This course is intended for automotive students who have the need to increase their background on electronically controlled engine management systems. Students will begin with an overview of concepts that are applicable to understanding and diagnosing systems on all vehicles; then will move on to the study of individual systems.

    Prerequisites: AUTO 1510  and AUTO 1765 .
  
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    AUTO 2800 - Problems in Automotive Technology


    (1-3CR) (Max. 6) Designed to provide the opportunity for advanced automotive students to pursue an independent problem in advanced areas of automotive repair. Students electing this course will develop, under supervision of an instructor, a problem, which is of specific interest to them.

    Prerequisites: Advanced standing in the automotive program, and permission of the instructor.
  
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    AUTO 2810 - Diagnosis and Tune-up Procedures (4CR)


    (2L, 4LB) Provides students with the theory, diagnosis, adjustment and repair of the systems that affect engine performance. Includes basic engine condition, distributor ignition, carburetion, and emission control systems. Emphasis is placed on accurate use of diagnostic tools, equipment, proper tuning procedures, use of specifications, and interpretation of test results.

    Prerequisites: AUTO 1510  and AUTO 2610 .
  
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    AUTO 2980 - Cooperative Work Experience (Automotive)


    (1-6CR) (Max. 8) On the job training with in automotive technology.

  
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    AUTO 2995 - Automotive Workshop: (Subtitle) (1-3CR)


    Overview of basic automotive systems, light service work and used vehicle inspection.


Aviation

  
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    AVTN 1980 - Cooperative Work Experience


    (1-8 CR) Students are afforded the opportunity to gain practical on-the-job experience in their specialties. Students will be supervised by the instructor and the employer. A minimum of 80 hours of on-the-job training represents one semester credit.

  
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    AVTN 2510 - Private Pilot Ground School (3CR)


    (3L) Includes the study of Federal Aviation Regulations, flight dynamics, meteorology, navigation, and airport operations. Designed to fulfill the ground school requirements for the FAA Private Pilot Certificate. FAA private pilot written test is class outcome.

  
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    AVTN 2520 - Private Pilot Flight School (3CR)


    (3L) Requires flight instruction as listed by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) for a private pilot license which will be paid by students directly to a FAA recognized flight school based on the flight school’s regularly published costs. Students will receive an S/U grade based on the results of a final check flight as required by the FAA.

    Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in AVTN 2510  and third-class medical certificate or permission of instructor.
  
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    AVTN 2600 - Instrument Pilot Ground School (3CR)


    (3L) Includes the study of aircraft altitude control, flight maneuvers, and flight based solely on instrument reference. Also covered are hazardous weather, interpreting weather data, FAA regulations and IFR procedures. FAA instrument rating written test is outcome.

    Prerequisites: AVTN 2520, or permission of the instructor.  
  
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    AVTN 2620 - Instrument Pilot Flight School (3CR)


    (3L) Teaches the application of aircraft altitude control, flight maneuvers, and flight based solely on instrument reference. (Stage I-III). The course also includes advance navigation, IFR/ATC procedures and night flying. Requires flight and hood instruction as listed by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) for an instrument rating which will be paid by students directly to a FAA recognized flight school based on the flight school’s regularly published costs. Students will receive an S/U grade based on the results of a final check flight as required by the FAA.

    Prerequisites: AVTN 2520, or permission of the instructor.
  
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    AVTN 2705 - Commercial Pilot Ground School (3CR)


    (3L) Includes the study of aircraft altitude control and flight maneuvers applicable to the commercial pilot certificate. Federal Aviation Administration commercial pilot written test is outcome.

    Prerequisites: AVTN 2620 , or permission of the instructor.
  
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    AVTN 2720 - Commercial Pilot Flight I (3CR)


    (3L) Advanced flight instruction teaching abilities such as precision altitude flying, commercial maneuvers, radio navigation, and night flying. Requires flight instruction as listed by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) for an Commercial Pilot License which will be paid by students directly to a FAA recognized flight school based on the flight school’s regularly published costs. Students will receive an S/U grade based on the results of an intermediate check flight as required by the FAA.

    Prerequisites: Completion of AVTN 2620, or permission of the instructor.
  
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    AVTN 2730 - Commercial Pilot Flight II (3CR)


    (3L) Advanced flight instruction teaching abilities such as precision altitude flying, commercial maneuvers, radio navigation, and night flying. Requires flight instruction as listed by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) for an Commercial Pilot License which will be paid by students directly to a FAA recognized flight school based on the flight school’s regularly published costs. Students will receive an S/U grade based on the results of an final check flight as required by the FAA.

    Prerequisites: AVTN 2720 - Commercial Pilot Flight I (3CR) Completion of AVTN 2720, or permission of instructor.

Banking

  
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    BANK 1500 - Principles of Banking (3CR)


    (3L) An introduction to the banking services. Includes history and evolution, the documents and language of banking, the deposit function, check processing and collection, bank bookkeeping, bank loans and investments, trust department services, specialized services to foreign traders and other banks, and bank regulations and examination.


Biology

  
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    BIOL 1000 - Introduction to Biology I (4CR)


    (3L, 3LB) A study of the cell as the unit of life, the chemistry of life, and an overview of the functioning of organs and organ systems of vertebrates. General biological principles such as genetics, homeostasis, and structure/function relationships are emphasized. This course is appropriate for biology and biology-related majors, especially those pursuing health-related degrees such as nursing, medical technology, occupational therapy, physical therapy, etc. It also fulfills the laboratory science requirements of such majors as education, social and behavioral sciences, humanistic studies, English, etc. Biology at the high school level is desirable but not required.

  
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    BIOL 1010 - General Biology I (4CR)


    (3L, 3LB) [E] Fundamental concepts including basic chemistry, cell structures and functions, tissues, energy reactions, genetics, molecular biology, population dynamics, and evolutionary theory. Designed for life science majors and pre-professional life science curricula. It is anticipated that students have had one year of high school biology.

  
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    BIOL 2022 - Animal Biology (4CR)


    (3L, 3LB) This course addresses the evolution, anatomy, physiology and ecology of animals. It is intended as a continuation of BIOL 1010 , generally for students majoring in the sciences.

    Prerequisites: BIOL 1000  or BIOL 1010  
  
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    BIOL 2023 - Plant and Fungal Biology (4CR)


    (3L, 3LB) An introduction to the principles of botany and mycology. Topics discussed include cell structure, anatomy, diversity, taxonomy, physiology, reproduction, genetics, evolution, and ecology of plants and fungi.

    Prerequisites: BIOL 1000 , BIOL 1010 , or equivalent.
  
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    BIOL 2110 - Yellowstone Field Science (3CR)


    (3L) A field approach to the ecology, natural history and politics of Yellowstone National Park. Students spend a hiking-intensive week and write about the experience under the guidance of an English instructor (ENGL 2055 ). Concentration will be on plant and animal identification, natural history, and interactions with each other and their environment. Political issues in Yellowstone, i.e., snowmobiles, bison migration and wolf restoration will be discussed.

  
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    BIOL 2120 - Biomedical and Environmental Ethics (3CR)


    (3L) This course will examine ethical issues related to medicine, biology technology and the natural environment. During the first half of the course, ethical theory is introduced, and the class will read, discuss and debate material on medical and technological issues such as defining life, abortion, euthanasia, biomedical research, genetic engineering and speciesism. The second half of the course will be devoted to issues such as animal rights, land ethics, crop engineering and the value of wilderness and biodiversity. Much class time is devoted to debate and discussion. College biology recommended.

  
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    BIOL 2325 - Tropical Ecology (3CR)


    (6LB) Tropical Ecology utilizes on-site instruction to introduce students to the fundamental principles of tropical biology, the natural history of important tropical plants and animals, and their conservation. Students will be introduced to a variety of habitats, depending on the country visited. Field orientation at each site visited includes identification of plants and animals and general ecology and natural history, area management, history and cultural considerations necessary for conservation and research in the tropics. Financial assistance may be available for interested and qualified students.

    Prerequisites: BIOL 1000  or BIOL 1010 , and permission of the instructor. Students must complete an application form, available from the instructor.
  
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    BIOL 2400 - General Ecology (3CR)


    (3L) [E] An introduction to the principles of ecology. Topics stressed include ecosystems, communities, populations, succession, aquatic and terrestrial habitats, natural selection, abiotic interactions, and speciation.

    Prerequisites: BIOL 1000 , BIOL 1010  or equivalent.
    Cross-listed: LIFE 2400  
  
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    BIOL 2410 - Field Ecology I (2CR)


    (5LB) [E] A field and laboratory course to introduce research methods in general ecology. Includes required field trips.

    Prerequisites: BIOL 1010 , or permission of the instructor.
    Cross-listed: LIFE 2410  
  
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    BIOL 2465 - Research Problems in Biology


    (1-3CR) (Max. 3) A comprehensive research study is required. Upon completing the project, the student should present a paper and oral seminar to a committee selected by the project instructor. The problem and amount of credit received must have the approval of the instructor.

    Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

Business

  
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    BUSN 2000 - Intro to International Business (3CR)


    (3L) [E] Students develop knowledge of the diverse cultural impact on multinational trade, marketing, finance, management, and government policies. Emphasis will be on the cultural dynamics of cultural business.


Business Administration

  
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    BADM 1000 - Intro to Business (3CR)


    (3L) [E] An orientation to the field of business: types of business organizations, financing of businesses, marketing functions, and business environment.

  
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    BADM 1005 - Business Mathematics I (3CR)


    (2L, 2LB) Designed to review basic mathematics skills and build a proficiency in the operation of electronic calculators. These skills are applied to practical business problems in bank services, payroll, taxes, risk management, mark-up, discount, depreciation, financial analysis, simple and compound interest.

    Prerequisites: MATH 0920  or Algebra Domain 40-65.
  
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    BADM 1020 - Business Communications (3CR)


    (3L) Helps students to compose, edit, and rapidly revise business messages on microcomputers. Group interaction is emphasized with written communications, reports, and other communications resources such as speaking and listening, and use of the Internet and e-mail.

  
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    BADM 1025 - Entrepreneurial Finance (3CR)


    (3L) The successful management of a company’s finances is fundamental to success in today’s competitive business environment. This course covers key economic concepts, management functions, financial statements and financial analysis used for a business.

  
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    BADM 1030 - Personal Finance (3CR)


    (3L) The efficient management of money is a prime requirement for a happy and successful family life. This course is designed to aid the student in planning a program for such major items as inflation, budgeting, insurance, savings and investment, home buying, and income taxes. Recommended as an elective for business and nonbusiness majors.

  
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    BADM 2010 - Legal Environment of Business (3CR)


    (3L) [E] An introductory survey course providing a broad overview of business related legal topics. Students will be familiarized with the nature and sources of law, court systems, jurisdictions of state and federal courts, small claims court, common law, statutory law, constitutional law, criminal law, torts, contracts, (especially as they are affected by the Uniform Commercial Code), social responsibility and business ethics, property law, estate planning, and how to avoid probate.

  
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    BADM 2025 - Employment Law (3CR)


    (3L) [E] This is an introductory survey course providing a broad overview of employment related topics. The course will cover both state and federal employment law.

  
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    BADM 2030 - Business Ethics (3CR)


    (3L) [E] This course focuses on the importance of ethics in business considerations as well as ethical issues in the news today. This course will examine how ethics is an essential part of all business elements, from management to employee development.

  
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    BADM 2040 - E-commerce (3CR)


    (3L) To prepare for the rapid changes in electronic commerce, students will be exposed to multifaceted business issues such as: the role of independent third-parties, the regulatory environment, risk management, Internet security standards, cryptography and authentication, firewalls, e-commerce payment mechanisms, intelligent agents, and web-based marketing.

    Prerequisites: INET 1895 .
  
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    BADM 2050 - Film Business and Legal Aspects (3CR)


    (3L) An introductory survey course providing a broad overview of business and legal topics in the film industry. Students will be familiarized with the nature of the film industry with special focus on independent films. Students will also learn copyright and trademark law associated with the film industry. Students will also explore new changes in the industry brought about by the digital age and new approaches in marketing through the internet.

    Prerequisites: None.
  
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    BADM 2055 - Media and Entertainment Law (3CR)


    (3L) An introductory survey course providing a broad overview of business and legal topics in the media and entertainment industry. Students will be familiarized with the beginnings of freedom of speech, press, and expression. Students will explore cutting edge, current events that highlight areas such as copyrights, advertising, pornography, censorship of the media, cable and satellite television, digital and satellite radio, and the internet. Students will also study and analyze media and entertainment law ethics issues.

     

    Prerequisites: None.

 

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