May 24, 2024  
2020-2021 Academic Catalog and Student Handbook 
    
2020-2021 Academic Catalog and Student Handbook [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Theatre

  
  • THEA 1020 - Children’s Theatre (3CR)


    (2L, 2LB) This course will include a brief history of Children’s Theatre, that is performance for children and youth; a study of selected plays that have been important in the development; the study and experience in the techniques employed in performing for children and youth, and will result in the development of a performance piece (play) that will be toured to local elementary schools.

  
  • THEA 1100 - Beginning Acting (3CR)


    (3L) [E] A foundation performance course with emphasis on exploring and developing sensory and emotional resources through creative exercises and improvisations leading to performance readiness. The course uses a step-by-step ‘learn by doing’ methodology.

  
  • THEA 1115 - Twentieth Century Avant Garde Theatre (3CR)


    (3L) This course will introduce students to styles and methods of performance that emerged as alternatives to mainstream theatre in the 20th century.

  
  • THEA 1120 - Asian Theatre (3CR)


    (3L) In this course, students will explore the theatrical forms of Asia, specifically the countries of China, Japan, India, Indonesia, and Burma. We will study the form and content of theatrical practices such as kabuki, noh, Chinese opera, banraku, buto, kathakali, and kyogen. Students also will study the theatrical theory underlying these practices; examples include the ancient Sanskrit treatise Natayasastra and the treatise by Zeami on the subject of Noh drama. Finally, students will read plays exemplary of these various theatrical practices.

    Prerequisites: None.
  
  • THEA 1125 - Musical Theatre Performance Techniques I (3CR)


    (2L, 2LB) This course is designed to integrate the learned skills of singing, acting, movement, voice and dancing into a synthesized, cohesive musical theatre performance craft.

  
  • THEA 1220 - CAD for Theatre (3CR)


    (2L, 2LB) An introductory course in computer graphics using AutoCAD software to create drafting for scenic and lighting designs. Students will be given the opportunity to learn 2-D and 3-D drawing, how to properly maintain files and how to produce hard copies.

  
  • THEA 1471 - Technical Theatre Practicum Costuming (2CR)


    (4LB) Required technical theatre lab work for all technical theatre majors not registered in THEA 2220  Stagecraft. Hands-on work constructing costumes used in Casper College Theatre and Dance Department productions. The student will develop an overview of how all the areas of technical construction overlap and support each other.

  
  • THEA 1472 - Technical Theatre Practicum Lighting (2CR)


    (4LB) Required technical theatre lab work for all technical theatre majors not registered in THEA 2220  Stagecraft. Hands-on work in lighting preparation used in Casper College Theatre and Dance Department productions. The student will develop an overview of how all the areas of technical construction overlap and support each other.

  
  • THEA 1473 - Technical Theatre Practicum Properties (2CR)


    (4LB) Required technical theatre lab work for all technical theatre majors not registered in THEA 2220  Stagecraft. Hands-on work constructing properties used in Casper College Theatre and Dance Department productions. The student will develop an overview of how all the areas of technical construction overlap and support each other.

  
  • THEA 2010 - Theatrical Backgrounds Drama I (3CR)


    (3L) [E] First semester of a one-year course. A study of plays from the major periods of dramatic literature. This course will cover from the Greeks through the Restoration.

    Prerequisites: THEA 1000  or THEA 1010 .
  
  • THEA 2020 - Theatrical Backgrounds Drama II (3CR)


    (3L) [E] Second semester of a one-year course. Covers major plays from the 18th century to the present. A continuation of THEA 2010 .

    Prerequisites: THEA 2010 , or permission of the instructor.
  
  • THEA 2030 - Beginning Playwriting (2CR)


    (2L) This course helps develop the student’s playwriting skills. It covers play formatting and scene writing exercises. Each exercise will be written outside of class. The student’s work will then be read and discussed in the following class.

  
  • THEA 2050 - Theatre Practice


    (1-2CR) (Max. 10) [E] Individually supervised practical training during the rehearsal and performance of faculty-directed theatre productions. Open entry.

    Prerequisites: permission of the instructor.
  
  • THEA 2060 - Production: Run Crew


    (1-2CR) Repeatable Individually supervised practical training during the rehearsal and performance of faculty-directed theatre productions. Open entry.

    Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.
  
  • THEA 2070 - Production: Costume Crew


    (1-2CR) (Max. 10) Individually supervised practical training during the rehearsal and performance of faculty-directed theatre productions. Open entry.

    Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.
  
  • THEA 2080 - Production: Stage Management


    (1-2CR) (Max. 10) Individually supervised experience in stage management during the rehearsal and performance of faculty-directed theatre productions.  Open entry.

    Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.
  
  • THEA 2090 - Production: Orchestra


    (1-2CR) Individually supervised practical training during the rehearsal and performance of faculty-directed theatre production. Open entry.

    Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.
  
  • THEA 2100 - Acting II (3CR)


    (3L) A course to develop the actor’s voice and body for characterization and character interaction through performance of scenes. Study of character and scene analysis.

    Prerequisites: THEA 1100 , or permission of the instructor.
  
  • THEA 2135 - Script Development (2CR)


    (2L) In this course, the class will explore the process of bringing a play “from the page to the stage.” Student playwrights with early drafts of original material will have the opportunity to workshop their plays with a group of actors and designers. As the plays are being revised, the group will examine ways in which the plays might be produced, gaining valuable insight into how the business of the theatre operates. Using only the resources available through the Department of Theatre and Dance and a production budget allocated by the Bakkhai, student directors and designers will have the opportunity to explore their visions of extant material and develop their ideas for production during the summer Theatre Brute season.

  
  • THEA 2140 - Voice for Acting (3CR)


    (3L) Study of voice and articulation as a means of improving vocal expression in performance.

  
  • THEA 2145 - Costume Construction (3CR)


    (1L, 4LB) [E] Will introduce all aspects of stage costuming: costume construction and the integrating of the costume with scenery, make-up, and lighting. This class will focus on the practical construction and crafting of costumes and may include practical laboratory work on college productions.

  
  • THEA 2155 - Movement for Acting (3CR)


    (3L) This course focuses on the physical training of the actor. Aspects of physical training that will be covered are: warm ups, dynamic movement, relaxation and alignment, coordination and control, and techniques such as stage combat and mime.

  
  • THEA 2160 - Stage Makeup (3CR)


    (1L, 4LB) [E] The practice of techniques involved in stage make-up. Straight and character make-ups, the application and shaping of beards and mustaches, and other techniques of realistic and nonrealistic make-up.

  
  • THEA 2220 - Stagecraft (4CR)


    (3L, 1LB) [E] Study of basic skills and procedures used to realize a design idea into a finished stage production. Work in design principles and techniques, set construction, color, and stage lighting. Laboratory required.

  
  • THEA 2225 - Playing with Shakespeare: Literature in Performance (4CR)


    (4L) A fresh look at Shakespeare, aimed at engaging students’ interests and increasing their appreciation and enjoyment of his works. Will include study of a variety of different performances. Will examine and respond to the interpretations of actors, directors, and literacy critics in order to arrive at a more complete understanding of Shakespeare’s plays, both as literature and performance.

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 , or permission of the instructor.
    Cross-listed: (Cross-listed as ENGL 2225 .)
  
  • THEA 2230 - Stage Lighting (3CR)


    (2L, 2LB) This is an introduction to the discipline of stage lighting which will examine the elemental aspects of stage lighting including: history, luminaries, color theory, lighting control, principles of lighting design and fundamental electricity. Laboratory required.

  
  • THEA 2235 - Introduction to Scenic Design (3CR)


    (3L) An introduction to the discipline of scenic design. Course will focus on the fundamentals of scenic design, including the history of design, fundamentals and principles of design, design process, and production of designer drawings, elevations, renderings and models.

    Prerequisites: THEA 2220  
  
  • THEA 2240 - Costume Design (3CR)


    (3L) An introduction to the discipline of costume design. This course will focus on the fundamentals of costume design, including history of design, history of fashion, fundamentals and principles of design, design process, and position of designer drawings, renderings, and other collaborative communications.

    Prerequisites: THEA 2145  
  
  • THEA 2310 - Auditioning (3CR)


    (2L, 2LB) Practical experience in preparing and presenting audition material, and a preparation for a career in theatre, film or television.

    Prerequisites: THEA 1100 , THEA 2100 , or permission of instructor.
  
  • THEA 2311 - Portfolio Preparation (1CR)


    (1L) This course is for beginning costume, makeup, set or lighting designers, stage managers and/or technical directors. It is the study and practice of the techniques and skills required to assemble a professional portfolio and to prepare the student to present their work and themselves in a professional manner when interviewing for transfer schools or jobs.

  
  • THEA 2350 - Musical Theatre History and Analysis (4CR)


    (4L) Understanding the history of musical theatre through the reading, listening, watching, and analyzing of specific groundbreaking musicals representative of the genre throughout the decades, and then how that information applies to each students professional craft.

  
  • THEA 2360 - Musical Theatre History and Analysis II (3CR)


    (3L) An advanced study of the analysis of musical theatre through the reading, listening, watching, and analyzing of specific groundbreaking musicals representative of the genre, and then how that information applies to each student’s professional craft. This course will fulfill the general education requirement for Cultural Environment.

    Prerequisites: THEA 2350  
  
  • THEA 2370 - Summer Theatre


    (2-6LB) (1-3CR) [E] (Max. 4) Credit for participation in the Casper College Summer Theatre Program in all phases of production. Open entry. (Summer term.)

    Prerequisites: permission of the instructor.
  
  • THEA 2475 - Directed Special Projects in Theatre (3CR)


    (1-3L, 2-6LB) (Max. 6) For students who wish to work in greater depth in acting, scenic design, stage lighting, costuming, research in theatre, etc. Course content will be contracted individually with each student in order to provide greater emphasis and experience in that student’s area of interest.

  
  • THEA 2790 - Stage Management (2CR)


    (2L) Learn the basic techniques used by stage managers to run and organize auditions, rehearsals, technical rehearsals and performances.


Welding Technology

  
  • WELD 1555 - Welding Technology Safety (1.5CR)


    (1L, 1LB) Designed to increase awareness of accident prevention and to recognize potential hazards in the working environment. Emphasis in the theory and practice of hand tools and shop equipment including good working habits toward drilling, tapping, grinding, filing, letter stamping, metal cutting, drill sharpening, machine guarding, and layout.

  
  • WELD 1650 - Print Reading (2CR)


    (2L) Designed to develop technical understanding of standard American Welding Society (AWS) symbols contained on engineering drawings and to effectively use this information to communicate welding instructions from the designer to the welder and fitter.

  
  • WELD 1700 - General Welding


    (.5L, 1LB) (1CR) or (1L, 3LB) (2.5CR) Includes the study of oxyacetylene welding, cutting and brazing (OAW, OAC), and Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW) processes. Students should develop skills necessary to produce quality welds on mild steel joints utilizing both processes.

  
  • WELD 1710 - Oxyacetylene Welding and Cutting (1.5CR)


    (1L, 1LB) Instruction in welding safety, oxyacetylene cutting (OAC), oxyacetylene welding (OAW) and torch brazing (TB) processes. Identification of the most common joint designs, including joining processes using bead, fillet, and groove welds. Applications used with art forms, pipe welding, and nonferrous metals are covered.

  
  • WELD 1755 - Shielded Metal Arc Welding (8CR)


    (4L, 8LB) Provides the student with the technical knowledge of Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW) safety, power sources, and electrode classification and selection. Training is provided to develop skills necessary to produce quality welds on mild steel in all positions using mild steel electrodes, low hydrogen electrodes, and iron powder electrodes using both AC and DC current.

  
  • WELD 1770 - Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) (5CR)


    (2L, 6LB) Provides the student with a technical understanding of Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) equipment, trouble-shooting and adjustments, metal transfer, shielding gases, and welding safety. Will include training in the gas metal arc spray and short circuit transfer, Flux Cored Arc Welding (FCAW), and Innershield.

  
  • WELD 1780 - Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) (5CR)


    (2L, 6LB) Provides the student with the knowledge and understanding of the Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) process, welding safety, and arc characteristics. Students should develop skills necessary to produce quality fillet and open groove welds on mild steel, stainless steel, and aluminum.

  
  • WELD 1820 - GMAW and GTAW Welding (2.5CR)


    (1L, 3LB) Provides basic instruction in the Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) and Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) processes. Emphasis on safety, machine set-up and trouble-shooting, and power sources. Students should develop skills necessary to produce quality welds on mild steel, aluminum, and stainless steel joints utilizing both processes.

  
  • WELD 1860 - Welding Fabrication (5CR)


    (2L, 6LB) Building a project of their choice, students display design, layout, and welding skills. Abilities are further developed using a variety of processes on construction of metal structures. Students are given the opportunity to compete in local and national competition with their projects.

    Prerequisites: WELD 1650 , WELD 1710 , WELD 1755 , WELD 1770 , AUBR 1820 .
  
  • WELD 1910 - Specialized Welding and Joining (3CR)


    (2L, 2LB) Emphasizes unique applications of hard-to-join metals and plastics. Utilizing modern technology, students are exposed to new dimensions in welding. Various laboratory exercises will cover plasma, submerged arc welding, resistance spot welding, metal surfacing, thermal torch spraying, and thermoplastic welding.

    Prerequisites: WELD 1710 , WELD 1755 , WELD 1770 , WELD 1820 , AUBR 1540 .
  
  • WELD 1975 - Independent Study Welding


    (1-3CR) Provides an option for students with sufficient background to pursue special interests in the welding laboratory under contract with the instructor.

    Prerequisites: Welding majors only.
  
  • WELD 1980 - Cooperative Work Experience


    (1-8CR) (Max. 8) Advanced students are afforded the opportunity to gain practical on-the job experience in their specialties. Students will be supervised by the instructor and the employer. A minimum of 80 hours of on-the-job training represents one semester credit.

    Prerequisites: permission of the instructor.
  
  • WELD 2500 - Structural Welding (3CR)


    (2L, 2LB) A continuation of ARC welding techniques utilizing Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW) Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) on a variety of structural applications. Emphasis will be placed on multiple positions and joint geometry common to industry. Testing and course material will be based on the American Welding Society Structural Welding Code D1.1.

    Prerequisites: WELD 1710  and WELD 1770 .
  
  • WELD 2510 - Pipe Welding I (4CR)


    (2L, 4LB) An introduction to pipe fabrication. Emphasis will be on joint preparation, formulas used in pipe layout, and uphill and downhill techniques. Welding will be done on carbon steel using the Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW) process with qualification testing in accordance with API and ASME codes.

    Prerequisites: WELD 1710 .or permission of instructor.
    Concurrently: Concurrent enrollment in WELD 1755  is required.
  
  • WELD 2520 - Pipe Welding II (5CR)


    (2L, 6LB) Designed to combine skills developed in previous courses to prepare pipe joints on carbon steel, stainless steel, and aluminum pipe. Welding will be done using the Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW), Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW), and Gas Metal Welding (GMAW) processes in the 2G, 5G and 6G positions. This course includes a welder qualification performance test in accordance with Section IX of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code.

    Prerequisites: WELD 2510 .
  
  • WELD 2970 - Welding Internship


    (1-8CR) Students will be placed in selected welding related industries for guided learning experiences providing the students with practical application of knowledge and skills learned in the classroom.

    Prerequisites: permission of the instructor.
  
  • WELD 2995 - Welding Workshop (1CR)


    (2LB) A variable interest course in the welding field designed for vocational education instructors only.


Women’s and Gender Studies

  
  
  • WMST 1080 - Introduction to Women’s Studies (3CR)


    (3L) [E] A discussion of issues central to women’s studies: the psychology, sociology and acculturation of women, and women’s contributions to and influence on society, culture, work, and the arts.

  
  • WMST 2020 - Women and Food (3CR)


    (3L) “Who is cooking what, for whom, under what conditions, and does it matter? Are we what we eat? A daily activity all of us must do and have done since the day we were born, eating plays a role in constructing our identities and the worlds we live in…this course will examine the complex interplay of food and the construction of identities and social structures. Focusing on women and gender within the contexts of race, class, and sexuality, we will explore food practices historically both domestically and in larger social structures including the global context. We will use historical and social analyses as well as memoir and fiction to explore these issues.” (description used with permission from Dr. Avakian at 2010 WMST Conference).

    Prerequisites: None.
  
  • WMST 2021 - Women in Music (3CR)


    (3L) This course explores women’s contribution to the field of Western music from Ancient Greece to modern times.

    Prerequisites: None.
    Cross-listed: MUSC 2021  
  
  • WMST 2025 - Women in Global Culture (3CR)


    (3L) In this course, we will explore global and cross-cultural perspectives on women and feminism. We will examine feminist perspectives across a range of national and international issues affecting all people, with an emphasis on the realities women face. We will also analyze the feminist debates surrounding Western concepts of feminisms and compare Western concepts to other concepts in different geographic and cultural contexts.

    Prerequisites: None.
  
  • WMST 2040 - History of Women in America (3CR)


    (3L) Examine women’s history, the activities and circumstances specific to women in America, and their contributions, influences, and significance.

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 , (or concurrent enrollment) or permission of the instructor.
  
  • WMST 2480 - Directed Special Projects


    (1-3L) (1-3CR) (Max. 3) Research project designed by student in consultation with instructor from the women’s studies department, and with approval of the director of women’s studies.

    Prerequisites: WMST 1080  and permission of the instructor.

Zoology

  
  • ZOO 2040 - Human Anatomy (3CR)


    (3L) [E] This course is designed to give students a hands-on experience with the microscopic and macroscopic elements of human anatomy. Topics covered include human anatomical principles ranging from the cellular to the organ system level. This course is intended to provide students with a solid anatomical background, which may be used to assist in learning human physiology.

    Concurrently: (This course must be combined with ZOO 2041  and ZOO 2110  in order to fulfill an anatomy and physiology requirement. *NOTE: a maximum of 8 credit hours in an Anatomy and Physiology course sequence may be applied toward graduation.)
    Cross-listed: (Cross-listed at UW as KIN 2040.)
  
  • ZOO 2041 - Human Anatomy Lab (1CR)


    (3LB) [E] This course is designed to give students a hands-on experience with the microscopic and macroscopic elements of human anatomy. Topics covered include human anatomical principles ranging from the cellular to the organ system level. This course is intended to provide students with a solid anatomical background, which may be used to assist in learning human physiology.

    Concurrently: To be taken concurrent with ZOO 2040  Human Anatomy.
    Cross-listed: (Cross-listed at UW as KIN 2041.)
  
  • ZOO 2110 - Human Physiology (4CR)


    (3L, 3LB) This course is a scientific inquiry into the physiology of select organ systems in the human body during homeostasis. Physical exertion, environmental effects and pathological change will also be discussed as they pertain to physiological change in organ system function. Physiologic concepts will be related to anatomical organization.

    Concurrently: (This course must be combined with ZOO 2040  and ZOO 2041  in order to fulfill an anatomy and physiology requirement. *NOTE: a maximum of 8 credit hours in an Anatomy and Physiology course sequence may be applied toward graduation.)
    Cross-listed: (Cross-listed with PEPR 2110 .)
  
  • ZOO 2140 - Cadaver Anatomy (4CR)


    (3L, 2LB) This course involves dissection of human anatomical donors for the purpose of studying human anatomy at the macroscopic level. The lecture portion of the course builds upon the principles of anatomy acquired in previous coursework. In the laboratory portion of the course, students will learn basic dissection techniques and will apply them to the dissection of a human anatomical donor. The course is regionally organized so that the primary focus is on the thorax, abdominal and cranial regions. Extremity, back and pelvic prosections will be studied. (Spring only.)

    Prerequisites: Successful completion of ZOO 2040 /ZOO 2041  and ZOO 2110 , or permission of the instructor.
  
  • ZOO 2450 - Principles of Fish and Wildlife Management (3CR)


    (3L) [E] Emphasizes principles of habitat and population biology and management, human dimensions of wildlife management, as well as law and policy.

    Cross-listed:   
 

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