May 25, 2024  
2020-2021 Academic Catalog and Student Handbook 
    
2020-2021 Academic Catalog and Student Handbook [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Radiology Technology

  
  • RDTK 1925 - Computed Tomography Physics and Instrumentation I (3CR)


    (3L) Content is designed to impart an understanding of the physical principles and instrumentation involved in computed tomography. Physics topics covered include the characteristics of X-radiation, CT beam attenuation, linear attenuation coefficients, tissue characteristics and Hounsfield numbers application. Data acquisition and manipulation techniques, image reconstruction algorithms such as filtered back-projection will be explained. Radiation protection and ethical issues associated with CT will be discussed.

    Prerequisites: RDTK 1610 , RDTK 1640 .
  
  • RDTK 1930 - Computed Tomography Clinical I (3CR)


    (13.5LB/week) Clinical education involves a practical learning experience in the patient care environment. Students participate in pre-scheduled time periods and practice their CT skills in a hospital or clinic setting. Students will be under the supervision of an experienced CT technologist. Emphasis will be placed on equipment utilization, exposure techniques, patient care, evaluation of CT procedures, evaluate image quality, radiation safety practices, contrast administration, positioning protocols and image acquisition. A specified number of clinical exam competencies will be required.

    Prerequisites: RDTK 1915 .
  
  • RDTK 1940 - Introduction to MRI (2CR)


    (2L) This course introduces the basic principles of MR safety and covers the concepts of patient management during MRI procedures. Educating patients and ancillary staff on magnet safety also is presented. Patient and magnet-related emergencies represent a unique situation to an MR technologist; recommended procedures and responsibilities of the technologist will be discussed for these situations. This content also covers MR contract agents and contraindications.

    Prerequisites: Admission to the MRI Program.
  
  • RDTK 1945 - MRI Clinical Education I (3CR)


    (13.5LB/week) Clinical education involves a practical learning experience in the patient care environment. Students participate in pre-scheduled time periods and practice their MRI skills in a hospital or clinic setting. Students will be under the supervision of an experienced MRI technologist. Emphasis will be placed on equipment utilization, exposure techniques, patient care, evaluation of MR procedures, evaluation of image quality, MR safety practices, contrast administration, positioning protocols and image acquisition. A specified number of clinical exam competencies will be required. A total of 195 supervised clinical hours will be completed.

    Prerequisites: Admission to the MRI Program, RDTK 1940 .
  
  • RDTK 1950 - MRI Procedures I (3CR)


    (3L) This content provides the student with imaging techniques related to the head, neck, spine, chest, thorax and abdominopelvic regions. The content covers specific clinical application, coils that are available and their use, considerations in the scan sequences, specific choices in the protocols (e.g., slice thickness, phase direction and flow compensation), and positioning criteria. Anatomical structures and the plane that best demonstrates anatomy are discussed as well as signal characteristics of normal and abnormal structures. This content outlines the critical criteria relevant to acquiring high-quality images of various anatomical regions. Due to different considerations for the various regions in the body, imaging protocols vary. The student studies the variations in imaging parameters for specific body regions and the resultant effect on signal characteristics and the anatomy represented. Evaluation criteria for determining the quality of images provides MR technologists with a better understanding of what constitutes a high-quality image. In a competency-based educational system, this content is completed prior to competency examinations. Review of appropriate patient care, contrast agents, and safety considerations while working in a magnetic field will be emphasized for each procedure. Pathologies associated with the areas discussed in this course will be reviewed.

    Prerequisites: Admission to MRI program, RDTK 2200 .
  
  • RDTK 1955 - MRI Principles I: Physics of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (3CR)


    (3L) This unit provides the student with a comprehensive overview of MR imaging principles. Topics include the history of MR, nuclear MR signal production, tissue characteristics, pulse sequencing, imaging parameters/options and image formation. This course is required to understand the basic principles of MR image acquisition. The course provides information on the fundamentals of MR image acquisition. This information is useful to enable the student to maximize MR image quality by understanding the fundamentals of MR imaging. Other areas covered include: magnetism, properties of magnetism, MR system components, MR magnets (permanent, resistive, superconducting, hybrid), radio frequency (RF) systems, gradient systems, shim systems and system shielding.

    Prerequisites: Admission into MRI program, RDTK 1940 .
  
  • RDTK 2200 - Sectional Anatomy (3CR)


    (2L, 2LB) Comprehensive coverage of head, neck, thorax, abdomen, pelvis and extremities in sagittal, transverse and coronal planes. A background in imaging is highly recommended but not required.

    Prerequisites: ZOO 2040 , ZOO 2041 , and ZOO 2110 .
  
  • RDTK 2550 - Mammography Fundamentals (3CR)


    (3L) This course covers the anatomy, pathology, and instrumentation involved in mammographic imaging. Topics covered will include: Patient Care, preparation and education; Instrumentation and Quality Assurance; Anatomy, Physiology and Pathology; Mammographic Technique and Image Evaluation; and Breast Imaging Procedures. Procedures will be covered in depth to include exam protocol, dose considerations, special patient care issues, interventional/special examinations, and diagnostic imaging. Special exams will include Needle Localization, Breast MRI, Breast Ultrasound: imaging, biopsy or FNA, Stereotactic Procedure, Breast Implant Imaging, Ductography, and Diagnostic Work-Up. Content is designed to impart an understanding of the physical principles, technique, quality control and image evaluation involved in mammography. Analog and digital acquisition and documentation will be discussed. Image processing and display will be examined from data acquisition through post processing and archiving.

    Prerequisites: ARRT registered & licensed and acceptance into the program.
  
  • RDTK 2555 - Mammography Clinical (2CR)


    (8LB) Clinical education involves a practical learning experience in the patient care environment. Students participate in pre-scheduled time periods and practice their Mammography skills in a hospital or clinic setting. Students will be under the supervision of an experienced Mammo technologist. Emphasis will be placed on Mammography equipment set-up, patient care, anatomy, pathology, mass documentation, understanding image quality, radiation safety practices, position, image acquisition and Quality Control. Post processing techniques will also be included. A specified number of clinical exam competencies will be required.

    Prerequisites: ARRT registered & licensed and acceptance into the program.
  
  • RDTK 2580 - Radiographic Positioning III (3CR)


    (2.5L, 1.5LB) Positioning skills of the cranium, sella turcica; petrous pyramids; facial bones; zygomatic arches; nasal bones; mandible; temporomandibular joints; temporal bone; optic foramen;  coccyx, bony thorax, digestive, and urinary systems including a study of contract media and fluoroscopy. Pediatric studies will also be included.

    Prerequisites: RDTK 1680 .
  
  • RDTK 2630 - Radiographic Pathology (3CR)


    (3L) General principles of pathology as well as disease processes and radiographic manifestations of specific body systems will be covered. A portion of the course will be devoted to the study of cancer and its radiographic appearance for the various systems. (Fall semester.)

    Prerequisites: ZOO 2040 , ZOO 2041 , ZOO 2110 , and RDTK 2810 .
  
  • RDTK 2640 - Radiation Biology and Protection (2CR)


    (2L) The effects of ionizing radiation on biological systems and essential radiation protection guidelines to minimize radiation exposure to the radiographer, the patient, and the public.

    Prerequisites: RDTK 1610 , RDTK 2710 , and ZOO 2040 , and ZOO 2041 .
  
  • RDTK 2710 - 2nd Yr-Clinical Education IV (2CR)


    (28LB/week) A continuation of RDTK 1910. This course involves a practical learning experience in the clinical radiographic environment. Students participate at prescheduled time periods and practice their radiographic skills for a total of 144 clinical education hours at various clinical locations. Students will be under the supervision of clinical instructors or registered radiographers during their experience. Skills necessary to perform entry level tasks in the clinical setting will be reviewed. Contrast studies, mammography, computerized tomography, myelography and arthrography will be emphasized. Students will also be scheduled in rotations through specialty imaging and therapeutic modalities. See program policies for clinical clock hours vs credit hours description.

    Prerequisites: RDTK 1910 .
  
  • RDTK 2810 - 2nd Yr-Clinical Education V (5CR)


    (22.5LB) A continuation of RDTK 2710. This course involves a practical learning experience in the clinical radiographic environment. Students participate at pre-scheduled time periods and practice their radiographic skills for a total of 330 clinical education hours at various clinical locations. Students will be under the supervision of clinical instructors or registered radiographers during their experience. Skills necessary to perform entry level tasks in the clinical setting will be reviewed. Skull, facial bones, CT, pediatric, contrast studies, trauma, surgical and mobile procedures will be reviewed. Students will also be scheduled in rotations through specialty imaging and therapeutic modalities. See program policies for clinical clock hours vs credit hours description.

    Prerequisites: RDTK 2710 .
  
  • RDTK 2910 - 2nd Yr-Clinical Education VI (5CR)


    (22.5LB) A continuation of RDTK 2810. This course involves a practical learning experience in the clinical radiographic environment. Students participate at pre-scheduled time periods and practice their radiographic skills for a total of 330 clinical education hours at various clinical locations. Students will be under the supervision of clinical instructors or registered radiographers during their experience. Skills necessary to perform entry level tasks in the clinical setting will be reviewed. Review sessions will cover all imaging procedures in preparation for graduation and the national ARRT examination. Students will also be scheduled in rotations through specialty imaging and therapeutic modalities. See program policies for clinical clock hours vs credit hours description.

    Prerequisites: RDTK 2810 .
  
  • RDTK 2915 - MRI Clinical Education II (3CR)


    (13.5LB/week) Clinical education involves a practical learning experience in the patient care environment. Students participate in pre-scheduled time periods and practice their MRI skills in a hospital or clinic setting. Students will be under the supervision of an experienced MRI technologist. Emphasis will be placed on equipment utilization, exposure techniques, patient care, evaluation of MR procedures, evaluation image quality, MR safety practices, contrast administration, positioning protocols and image acquisition. A specified number of clinical exam competencies will be required.

    Prerequisites: RDTK 1945 .
  
  • RDTK 2920 - MRI Procedures II (3CR)


    (3L) This content provides the student with imaging techniques related to the musculoskeletal system, upper and lower extremities and vascular systems. The course will also present detailed content covering MRI pediatric procedures and specialized MR imaging exams to include: Magnetic resonance angiography, MR arthrography, and fMRI. The content covers specific application, coils that are available and their use, considerations in the scan sequences, specific choices in the protocols (e.g., slice thickness, phase direction and flow compensation), and positioning criteria. Anatomical structures and the plane that best demonstrates anatomy are discussed as well as signal characteristics of normal and abnormal structures. Content outlines the critical criteria relevant to acquiring high-quality images of various anatomical regions. Due to different considerations for the various regions in the body, imaging protocols vary. The student will study the variations in imaging parameters for specific body regions and the resultant effect on signal characteristics and the anatomy represented. Evaluation criteria for determining the quality of images provides MR technologists with a better understanding of what constitutes a high-quality image. In a competency-based educational system, this content is completed prior to competency examinations. Pathologies associated with the areas discussed in this course will be reviewed.

    Prerequisites: RDTK 1950 .
  
  • RDTK 2925 - MRI Principles II: Instrumentation and Imaging (3CR)


    (3L) This unit is designed to provide the student with a comprehensive overview of MR pulse sequences, image formation and image contrast. Pulse sequences include spin echo, inversion recovery, echo planar, parallel imaging and spectroscopy. In addition, tissue characteristics, contrast agents and post processing techniques are covered. This course provides the student with knowledge of the parameters and imaging options used to create MR images. In addition, the content introduces quality assurance measures used in maintaining image quality.

    Prerequisites: RDTK 1955 .
  
  • RDTK 2930 - Transition from Student to Radiographer (2CR)


    (2L) Provides the advanced student technologist an opportunity to review previously learned radiologic material and effectively prepare for the national certification examination. Résumé preparation, interviewing skills and professional organization participation will be included. Continuing personal and professional growth will be emphasized in this course.

    Prerequisites: RDTK 2910 .
  
  • RDTK 2935 - Computed Tomography Clinical II (3CR)


    (13.5LB/week) Clinical education involves a practical learning experience in the patient care environment. Students participate in pre-scheduled time periods and practice their CT skills in a hospital or clinic setting. Students will be under the supervision of an experienced CT technologist. In this second clinical course students will be expected to perform more advanced procedures in a solo capacity under supervision. Emphasis will be placed on CT technique, selection, patient care, anatomy, pathology, understanding image quality, radiation safety practices, contrast administration, positioning and image acquisition. Post processing techniques will also be included. A specified number of clinical exam competencies will be required.

    Prerequisites: RDTK 1930 .
  
  • RDTK 2941 - Computed Tomography Physics and Instrumentation II (3CR)


    (3L) Content is designed to impart an understanding of the physical principles and instrumentation involved in computed tomography. Physics topics covered include computed tomography systems and operations will be explored with full coverage of radiographic tube configuration, collimator design and function, detector type, characteristics and functions and the CT computer and array processor. CT image processing and display will be examined from data acquisition through post processing and archiving and patient factors related to other elements affecting image quality will be explained, as well as artifact production and reduction and image communication.

    Prerequisites: RDTK 1925 .
  
  • RDTK 2945 - Computed Tomography Procedures II (3CR)


    (3L) This course covers the anatomy and common pathology associated with computer tomography. The anatomical structures will be demonstrated in the axial, sagittal and coronal imaging planes. Scanning protocols, contrast administration, and contraindications for computer tomography of the pediatric procedures will be covered in depth to include: exam protocol, radiation protection and dose considerations, special patient care issues and contrast media and injections. Pediatric exams will cover CT of the head, neck, spine, abdomen, chest, musculoskeletal system, and CT angiography. Special applications in CT will be presented. Specialized CT procedures will include breast imaging, interventional CT studies, CT fluoroscopy, PET and CT fusion, cardiac scanning, CT angiography, CT guided biopsies, virtual colonoscopy, brain and transplant studies. Radiation therapy simulation studies will also be discussed. Content provides detailed coverage of procedures for CT imaging. Procedures include, but are not limited to, indications for the procedure, patient education, preparation, orientation and positioning , patient history and assessment, contrast media usage, scout image, selectable scan parameters, filming and archiving of the images. CT procedures will be taught for differentiation of specific structures, patient symptomology and pathology. CT images studied will be reviewed for quality, anatomy and pathology. CT procedures vary from facility to facility and normally are dependent on the preferences of the radiologists.

    Prerequisites: RDTK 2200 , RDTK 1920 .

Range Management

  
  • REWM 2000 - Principles of Range Management (3CR)


    (2L, 2LB) [E] Basic principles of range management as they relate to livestock production, conservation practices and wildlife management, region vegetative types and range sites, and grazing systems and multiple range uses. Several field trips included.


Religion

  
  • RELI 1000 - Introduction to Religion (3CR)


    (3L) [E] This course will introduce the major world religions and the role they play in shaping cultures and societies. The class will make use of various academic approaches to study religions emphasizing similarities and differences. Instructors will draw upon research in a range of fields, including: anthropology, history, sociology, and the humanities.


Renewable Energy Technology

  
  • RETK 1500 - Solar Power Systems (2CR)


    (2L) This course will introduce students to the basic concepts of various active and passive solar energy conversion technologies as they relate to other renewable energy technologies.

  
  • RETK 1505 - Small Wind Turbines (2CR)


    (2L) This course is designed to examine small wind generation. Students will learn how small wind generators function, their connection to loads and distribution systems and design and application considerations. Students will also explore small wind turbine siting including potential wind energy calculations and turbine performance.

  
  • RETK 1520 - Wind Power Systems (3CR)


    (2L, 2LB) This course is designed to provide students with an in-depth overview of wind power systems on the commercial size scale. The class – will explore turbine components and operations, operations of wind generating facilities, maintenance practices and system interconnect requirements.

  
  • RETK 1525 - Blade Installation and Maintenance (3CR)


    (2L, 2LB) This course is designed to introduce students to the design considerations, installation and maintenance of wind turbine blades. The course will address blade performance as a function of blade design (aerodynamics), installation of blades for commercial size turbines and basic repair and maintenance of turbine blades.

  
  • RETK 1530 - Crane and Rigging Operations (1CR)


    (1L) This course will introduce students to crane and rigging operations and will include presentations on crane operation theory and rigging procedures.

  
  • RETK 1535 - High Angle/Confined Space Rescue (2CR)


    (1L, 2LB) This course will introduce students to the minimum requirements needed to safely rescue and perform elevated work.

  
  • RETK 1980 - Cooperative Work Experience


    (1-8 CR) (Max. 8) On the job training with a cooperative renewable energy business or facility. Eighty hours of work per semester earns one hour of credit.

    Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.
  
  • RETK 2500 - Basic Site Planning (3CR)


    (3L) This class is designed to teach students the concepts and processes employed in evaluating and preparing sites for construction of renewable energy projects.

  
  • RETK 2530 - Instrumentation (3CR)


    (2L, 2LB) This course will introduce students to instrumentation systems used in the performance and condition monitoring and controlling of renewable energy technologies including wind power production, active and passive solar applications.

  
  • RETK 2550 - Power Distribution (3CR)


    (2L, 2LB) This course will introduce students to basic concepts in electric power distribution systems as they relate to renewable energy resources. The course will examine inter-connection equipment and process and electric power substation, transmission and distribution systems.


Respiratory Therapy

  
  • RESP 1500 - Introduction to Respiratory Therapy (3CR)


    (3L) Historical, governmental, and association overview of respiratory therapy. This course will introduce the student to patient assessment concepts as well as common respiratory pathologies and an introduction to respiratory pathologies. This course will introduce the student to respiratory physics. (First year summer semester.)

    Prerequisites: admission into the respiratory therapy program.
  
  • RESP 1505 - Cardiopulmonary Anatomy & Physiology (2CR)


    (2L) This course will cover the Anatomy and Physiology of the Cardiopulmonary systems of the adult human body. (First year fall semester.)

    Prerequisites: admission into the respiratory therapy program.
  
  • RESP 1507 - Respiratory Therapy I (3CR)


    (3L) This course will cover Oxygen supply and medical gases, as well as an overview of common respiratory pathologies. (First year fall semester.)

    Prerequisites: RESP 1500  RESP 1505 .
  
  • RESP 1515 - Respiratory Lab I (1CR)


    (4LB) This course will be the laboratory where respiratory skills are practiced, simulated and learned before using them in the clinical rotation. Subjects covered will be patient assessment, oxygen systems and administration, aerosol and humidity therapy, medication delivery, lung expansion therapy and pulmonary hygiene. (First year fall semester.)

    Prerequisites: RESP 1500 , RESP 1505 .
  
  • RESP 1518 - Respiratory Practicum I (3CR)


    (12LB) Students will rotate to several clinical sites as well as our clinical simulation center, in order to practice skills training under direct supervision. These rotations will include patient assessment, oxygen administration, aerosol and humidity therapy, medication delivery and lung expansion therapy.

    Prerequisites: RESP 1500 , RESP 1505 .
  
  • RESP 1523 - Respiratory Pharmacology (2CR)


    (2L) This course will cover material on respiratory specific drugs and those drugs that are commonly used in association with respiratory disease. (First year fall semester.)

    Prerequisites: RESP 1500 , RESP 1505 .
  
  • RESP 1527 - Respiratory Therapy II (3CR)


    (3L) Course material will cover subjects of respiratory failure, and mechanical ventilation for the adult patient. All phases of mechanical ventilation will be introduced, including initiation, management and weaning. (First year spring semester.)

    Prerequisites: RESP 1507 , RESP 1515 , RESP 1518 , RESP 1523 .
  
  • RESP 1535 - Respiratory Lab II (1CR)


    (4LB) Course material will include mechanical ventilation and patient monitoring, airway management, suctioning, tracheostomy care and EKG’s. (First year spring semester.)

    Prerequisites: RESP 1507 , RESP 1515 , RESP 1518 , RESP 1523 .
  
  • RESP 1538 - Respiratory Practicum II (4CR)


    (16LB) Continuation of skills training at our clinical sites and clinical simulation center. Additional skills in airway management and ventilator initiation will be introduced under direct supervision. Case studies will be researched and presented to the class. The student will also participate in critical thinking classes to improve their clinical decision making skills. See program handbook for clinical clock hours vs credit hours description. (First year spring semester.)

    Prerequisites: RESP 1507 , RESP 1515 , RESP 1518 , RESP 1523 .
  
  • RESP 1545 - Respiratory Pathophysiology (2CR)


    (2L) This course will cover common respiratory therapy disease pathologies that require special diagnostic evaluation techniques and treatment modalities. Course subject content will include airway management, EKG’s, PFT’s, HBO, bronchoscopy, chest tubes and the pathophysiology of the renal system.

    Prerequisites:  ,  ,  ,   
  
  • RESP 2500 - Respiratory Specialty Practicum (3CR)


    (12LB) Continuation of skills training at our clinical sites, and clinical simulation center. During this clinical rotation, students will be exposed to mechanical ventilation in the adult critical care setting.

  
  • RESP 2507 - Respiratory Therapy III (3CR)


    (3L) This course will continue in the study of mechanical ventilation with emphasis on advanced modes and management as well as operational overviews of ABG drawing and analysis. Students should have an understanding of some common pathophysiologies associated with critical care. (Second year fall semester.)

    Prerequisites: RESP 2500 .
  
  • RESP 2510 - Respiratory Pediatrics and Neonatology (2CR)


    (2L) Course material will cover prenatal, neonatal, and pediatric respiratory care. (First year spring semester.)

    Prerequisites:     
  
  • RESP 2545 - Respiratory Lab III (1CR)


    (4LB) Course material will cover additional mechanical ventilation modalities along with ABG’s drawing techniques. Clinical competencies will include newborn and pediatric respiratory care and ventilator management. The students will be required to complete NPR certification. (Second year fall semester.)

    Prerequisites: RESP 2500 .
  
  • RESP 2548 - Respiratory Practicum III (4CR)


    (16LB) Continuation of skills training at our clinical sites and clinical simulation center, with an emphasis on ICU, critical care and advanced ventilator management. The student will also participate in critical thinking classes to improve their clinical decision making skills. Case studies will be researched and presented. See program handbook for clinical clock hours versus credit hours description. (Second year fall semester.)

    Prerequisites: RESP 2500 .
  
  • RESP 2557 - Respiratory Therapy IV (3CR)


    (3L) Course material will cover the transitioning from student to the respiratory care professional. Students will prepare for the national board exams, with a complete comprehensive review of respiratory care. (Second year spring semester.)

    Prerequisites: RESP 2507 , RESP 2510 , RESP 2545 , RESP 2548 .
  
  • RESP 2570 - Respiratory Simulations (2CR)


    (2L) Students will take and pass the NBRC level written and simulation exams. Course work will help towards the success of passing these exams. (Second year spring semester.)

    Prerequisites: RESP 2507 , RESP 2510 , RESP 2545 , RESP 2548 .
  
  • RESP 2575 - Respiratory Lab IV (1CR)


    (4LB) Laboratory skills training for passing the advanced cardiopulmonary life support (ACLS) as well as pediatric advanced life support (PALS) tests. Introduction of advanced respiratory modalities. A research paper assignment involving an aspect of respiratory care. (Second year spring semester.)

    Prerequisites: RESP 2507 , RESP 1545 , RESP 2545 , RESP 2548 .
  
  • RESP 2578 - Respiratory Practicum IV (4CR)


    (16LB) Continuation of skills training at our clinical sites, and clinical simulation center. Students will travel to a Level III nursery for clinical exposure to neonate and pediatric critical care. Emphasis will be on all aspects of ventilator management, the acute respiratory patient and preparation for the CSE portion of the RRT exam. Students will research, present and critique case studies. See program handbook for clinical clock hours vs credit hours description. (Second year spring semester.)

    Prerequisites: RESP 2507 , RESP 2510 , RESP 2545 , RESP 2548 .

Russian

  
  • RUSS 0900 - Russian for Travelers (1CR)


    (1L) A course of simple Russian to help the traveler make plans, obtain tickets, order meals, and ask for and understand general information as needed for travel in a Russian-speaking country.

  
  • RUSS 1010 - First Year Russian I (4CR)


    (4L) This course utilizes a multi-skill approach: listening, speaking, reading, and writing and is designed for beginners or those with a weak background in Russian. Students who want to take for credit the next course in the sequence must complete this course with a grade of “C” or better.

  
  • RUSS 1020 - First Year Russian II (4CR)


    (4L) This course is a continuation of RUSS 1010  and utilizes a multi-skill approach: listening, speaking, reading, and writing and is designed for beginners or those with a weak background in Russian. Students who want to take for credit the next course in the sequence must complete this course with a grade of “C” or better.

    Prerequisites: RUSS 1010  or equivalent.
  
  • RUSS 2030 - Second Year Russian I (4CR)


    (4L) [E] Grammar completion and conversation with a study of authentic cultural materials in Russian.

    Prerequisites: Successful completion of RUSS 1020  or permission of instructor.
  
  • RUSS 2475 - Independent Study in Russian (1-4CR) (Max. 4 credits)


    (1-4CR) (Max. 4 credits) Students will meet with the instructor to discuss independently assigned reading and reports from sources of special interest to the student(s) and pertaining to Russian culture and/or current events which are selected in consultation with the Russian instructor of record. Coursework will be done in Russian. Some oral/aural work will be required and grammatical topics may be revisited and expanded upon.

    Prerequisites: Successful completion of RUSS 1020  or permission of the instructor.

Social Work

  
  • SOWK 2000 - Intro to Social Work (3CR)


    (3L) Introduces social work and social welfare through an overview of the history, philosophy, ethics, values, methods, and fields of practice to generalist social work.

    Concurrently: Concurrent enrollment in SOWK 2005  is optional.
  
  • SOWK 2005 - Social Work Lab (1CR)


    (2LB) This volunteer assignment is designed to acquaint the student with services and agencies providing a wide range of human services in the field of social work. This course is an optional Lab component taken in concern with SOWK 2000 – Foundations of Social Work.  

  
  • SOWK 2025 - Social Work Capstone (3CR)


    (3L) In this class, students will reflect upon prior coursework in a range of social science disciplines. In addition, students will complete assignments that assist in preparation for further study in the field of social work.

    Prerequisites: SOC 1000 , SOWK 2000 , ENGL 1020 , ECON 1010 , and PSYC 1000  

Sociology

  
  • SOC 1000 - Sociological Principles (3CR)


    (3L) [E] A survey of the organization of human society and the impact of group membership and interpersonal relationships upon human behavior.

  
  • SOC 1100 - Social Problems (3CR)


    (3L) [E] An analysis of the causes, effects and possible avenues for eradicating the social problems of our society. Crime, delinquency, family disorganization, racial conflict, and poverty are some areas of investigation.

    Prerequisites: SOC 1000 , or permission of the instructor.
  
  • SOC 1101 - Education and the Good life: A First-Year Seminar (3CR)


    (3L) [E] SOC 1101 is a first-year seminar focused on the nature and purpose of higher education. As individuals, and in groups, students examine the personal, social, civic, and economic goals of a public college with emphasis on the role of the arts and sciences. During the class, students do research, they think through complex issues, consult with others, and in the end, present samples of their work to the instructor and classmates.

  
  • SOC 2112 - Environmental Sociology (3CR)


    (3L) Environmental sociology is focused on the intersection of the social and physical worlds. The course explores the constant interaction between human societies and the environments they depend upon. The analysis includes an examination of economic patterns like consumption, production, and the use of environmental resources. The course also includes a discussion of the social mechanisms that shape our relationship to the environment – norms, roles, values, beliefs, and ideology.

  
  • SOC 2200 - Sociology of Human Sexuality (3CR)


    (3L) [E] An interdisciplinary course designed to acquaint the student with the major factors affecting human sexuality. Relevant research is reviewed in biology, psychology, sociology, and anthropology, as well as religious and historical perspectives.

    Prerequisites: A 1000 level introductory social science or biology course.
    Cross-listed: (Cross listed as PSYC 2200 .)
  
  • SOC 2325 - Marriage and Family (3CR)


    (3L) The family as a major institution. The significant aspects of courtship and marriage; contemporary marital and domestic problems; changing functions of the family and the impact of major social changes on family life are studied.

    Prerequisites: SOC 1000 , PSYC 1000 , or permission of the instructor.
  
  • SOC 2400 - Criminology (3CR)


    (3L) [E] A general introduction to the nature of crime, statistics on crime, types of criminal behavior, and explorations of crime.

    Prerequisites: SOC 1000 , or permission of the instructor.

Soil Science

  
  • SOIL 2010 - Introduction to Soil Science (4CR)


    (3L, 2LB) [E]  Introduces soil ecological processes and management in terrestrial environments. Discusses interaction of soil, biological, chemical. Morphological, and physical properties with land management in wild land and agricultural ecosystems. Emphasis is on plant response to soil conditions. (Spring semester.)

    Prerequisites: None

Spanish

  
  • SPAN 0900 - Spanish for Travelers (1CR)


    (1L) A course of simple Spanish to help the traveler order meals, make travel plans, obtain tickets, and ask for and understand general information as needed for travel in a Spanish-speaking country.

  
  • SPAN 1010 - First Year Spanish I (4CR)


    (4L) [E] This course is intended for students who have never studied Spanish at the college level. Students will learn the fundamentals of the Spanish language through listening, speaking, reading and writing activities of the ACTFL (American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages) Novice High Level. This course will also introduce students to the culture of various Spanish-speaking countries. Language laboratory times are required as needed. Students who want to take for credit the next course in the sequence must complete this course with grade of a ‘C’ or better.

  
  • SPAN 1015 - Novice Spanish II (2CR)


    (2L) This course is a continuation of the objectives outlined in SPAN 1005 . A student who needs four credits of Spanish for his/her degree must take one semester of SPAN 1005  followed by one semester of SPAN 1015 to receive credit equivalent to SPAN 1010 . Should a student take SPAN 1005  followed by SPAN 1010 , the student will receive credit for only SPAN 1010 . Four credits maximum are allowed for SPAN 1005 , SPAN 1010 , and SPAN 1015. Students who want to take for credit the next course in the sequence must complete this course with a grade of “C” or better.

    Prerequisites: SPAN 1005  with a grade of “C” or better.
  
  • SPAN 1020 - First Year Spanish II (4CR)


    (4L) [E] This course is a continuation of the objectives in SPAN 1010. Students will become more proficient in listening, speaking, reading, and writing Spanish and will further their grammatical study of the Spanish language at the ACTFL (American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages) Novice Mid-Level. The course will continue to introduce students to the culture of various Spanish-speaking countries. Language laboratory times are required as needed.

    Prerequisites: A grade of “C” or better in SPAN 1010, CLEP test result, or instructor’s permission.
  
  • SPAN 2030 - Second Year Spanish I (4CR)


    (4L) [E] This course focuses on increased development of listening, speaking reading, and writing skills in Spanish. Students review and expand upon grammar points which facilitate successful communication at the ACTFL (American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages) Novice High Level. Language laboratory times are required as needed.

    Prerequisites: A grade of “C” or better in SPAN 1020 , CLEP test result, or instructor’s permission.
  
  • SPAN 2040 - Second Year Spanish II (4CR)


    (4L) [E] This course further emphasizes the development of all four communicative aspects of the Spanish language through composition, conversation, oral presentations, and grammar study. Language laboratory times are required as needed.

    Prerequisites: A grade of “C” or better in SPAN 2030 , CLEP test result, or instructor’s permission.
  
  • SPAN 2140 - Introduction to Reading/Composition and Conversation (3CR)


    (3L) [E] Reading of literature with emphasis on creative written expression; included is an introduction to Hispanic culture. Students who want to take for credit the next course in the sequence must complete this course with a grade of “C” or better.

    Prerequisites: SPAN 2040 , or permission of the instructor. Students speak in Spanish. Emphasis on Latin American literature.
  
  • SPAN 2220 - Intermediate Composition and Conversation (3CR)


    (3L) Reading of literature with emphasis on creative written expression; included is an introduction to Hispanic culture. Students who want to take for credit the next course in the sequence must complete this course with a grade of “C” or better.

    Prerequisites: SPAN 2140 , or permission of the instructor. Students speak in Spanish. Emphasis on Spanish literature.
  
  • SPAN 2410 - Introduction to Oaxacan Culture (1CR)


    (1L) This course will focus on unique culture found in Oaxaca, Mexico. It will prepare students to more fully appreciate that culture while living in the midst of it as they attend a Spanish Language course at the Universidad Regional del Sureste (URSE) and take part in a service learning project in Oaxaca. This course is required of all students who wish to participate in the Student Exchange between Casper College and URSE. It must be passed with a grade of “C” or better and must be taken concurrently with SPAN 2420 .

    Prerequisites: Successful completion of SPAN 1010  with a grade of “C” or better, must be 18 years old by 1 January of the year in which the exchange is offered.
  
  • SPAN 2420 - Travel to Mexico: Oaxaca (3CR)


    (3L) This course will focus on unique or specific situations associated with traveling to Mexico (specifically Oaxaca). It will prepare students to successfully complete a Spanish language course at the Universidad Regional del Sureste (URSE) and a service learning project in Oaxaca. This course is required of all students who wish to participate in the Student Exchange between Casper College and URSE. It must be passed with a grade of “C” or better and must be taken concurrently with SPAN 2410 .

    Prerequisites: Successful completion of SPAN 1010  with a grade of “C” or better; must be 18 years old by 1 January of the year in which the exchange is offered.
  
  • SPAN 2475 - Independent Study, Spanish


    (1-4CR) (Max. 4) Individual appointments with instructor. Books studied independently by student in consultation with instructor. Students who want to take for credit the next course in the sequence must complete this course with a grade of “C” or better.

    Prerequisites: SPAN 2040 , or permission of the instructor.
  
  • SPAN 2495 - Workshop: Topic


    (.5-3CR) (Max. 12) Offered in response to needs and interests of students and members of business and the community. Various topics will focus on development of practical Spanish-speaking skills and cultural awareness. A student may repeat this course, under different topics, for credit up to a maximum of 12 credit hours. Students who want to take for credit the next course in the sequence must complete this course with a grade of “C” or better.


Statistics

  
  
  
  
  
  • STAT 2000 - Statistics and the World (3CR)


    (3L) Discusses statistical reasoning and methods as related to today’s society. Emphasizes ideas rather than specific techniques. Focuses on real examples of the use (and misuse) of statistics. Includes sampling, experimentation, descriptive statistics, elementary probability and statistical inference.

    Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in MATH 0930  or MATH 1000  or higher.
  
  • STAT 2050 - Fundamentals of Statistics (4CR)


    (5L) [E] Primarily for the students of the life sciences, behavioral sciences, and physical sciences. Includes frequency distributions and graphics, central tendency, dispersion, useful probability models, and basic statistical inference including linear regression and correlation.

    Prerequisites: A “C” or better in MATH 1000  or MATH 1400 , or an ACT Math score of 23 or better, or an appropriate COMPASS Exam score within the past year.
  
  • STAT 2070 - Introductory Statistics for Social Science (4CR)


    (5L) [E] Primarily for the students of the social sciences. Includes frequency distributions and graphics, central tendency, dispersion, useful probability models, and basic statistical inference including linear regression and correlation, with emphasis on applications in the social sciences.

    Prerequisites: A “C” or better in MATH 1000  or MATH 1400 , or an ACT Math score of 23 or better, or an appropriate COMPASS Exam score within the past year.
  
  • STAT 2120 - Applied Sampling Methods (5CR)


    (5L) This course develops methodology of simple random sampling, stratified sampling, and multistage sampling; provides applications related to physical, social, and biological sciences; discusses single and two-variable estimation techniques, and presents estimation based on subsamples from subpopulations.

    Prerequisites: A “C” or better in STAT 2050  or STAT 2070 .
  
  • STAT 2121 - Sampling Supplement (2CR)


    (2L) This course is a required co-enrollment class to be taken with STAT 4155 (Sampling) offered at Casper College by the University of Wyoming. When combined with STAT 4155, content is identical to STAT 2120 .

  
  • STAT 2150 - Applied Statistical Methods of Data Analysis (4CR)


    4L [E] A continuation of statistical inference methods begun in STAT 2050 and STAT 2070. Topics include the design of experiments, multi-sample and multivariate methods, multiple regression, ANOVA, ANCOVA, MANOVA, and non-parametric methods. Emphasis is on interpretation of analyses provided by statistical software.

    Prerequisites: A ‘C’ or better in STAT 2050  or STAT 2070 .
  
  • STAT 2215 - Applied Linear Regression


    5L, 5CR This course is intended to be an introduction to regression analysis techniques. Its focus will be on the application of linear regression models in practice but will also cover basic theory of the linear model. Topics include: the simple linear regression model, methodology for fitting models, statistical inference for linear models, diagnostics for verification of assumptions and their remedies, multiple linear regression models, binary indicators and qualitative predictors, diagnostic measures of model fit, variable selection and model building.  Other topics including generalized linear models and logistic regression will be covered as time allows. once every two years; our next step is to list this as an option in which our students can choose to complete their STAT A.S. or STAT Certificate.

    Prerequisites: STAT 2150
  
  • STAT 2220 - Applied Experimental Design (5CR)


    (5L) This course reviews design and analysis of one-factor experiments and introduces multi-factor experiments, Latin squares, nested designs and random effects. It also introduces topics such as polynomial response curves, trend analysis, split plots, and incomplete blocks as time permits.

    Prerequisites: A grade of “C” or better in STAT 2150 .
  
  • STAT 2221 - Design and Analysis of Experiments Supplement (2CR)


    (2L) This course is a required co-enrollment class to be taken with STAT 4025 (Design and Analysis of Experiments) offered at Casper College by the University of Wyoming. When combined with STAT 4025, content is identical to STAT 2220 .

  
  • STAT 2240 - Applied Categorical Data Analysis (5CR)


    (5L) This course covers applied methods for analyzing associations when some or all variables are measured in discrete categories, not continuous scales. Topics include the binomial, multinomial, and Poisson probability models, parameter estimation and hypothesis-testing and proportions, measures of association and tests for contingency tables, logistic regression, and log-linear models.

    Prerequisites: A grade of “C” or better in STAT 2150 .
  
  • STAT 2241 - Categorical Data Analysis Supplement (2CR)


    (2L) This course is a required co-enrollment class to be taken with STAT 4045 (Categorical Data Analysis) offered at Casper College by the University of Wyoming. When combined with STAT 4045, content is identical to STAT 2240 .

  
  • STAT 2485 - Statistics Laboratory (2CR)


    (1L, 2LB) This course provides a real-life introduction to the elements of client consultation. The student will learn to translate the client’s needs into statistical methodology under the supervision of the faculty. Client questions will include elements of design, sampling methods, analysis procedures, and interpretation of analysis, which the student will now learn to apply. Complicated issues will be discussed and resolved in a seminar format.

    Prerequisites: A grade of “C” or better in STAT 2220 .

Theatre

  
  • THEA 1000 - Intro to the Theatre (3CR)


    (3L) [E] Designed to stimulate an interest and appreciation of the role of the theatre in the modern world including a survey of major theatrical periods from the Golden Age of Greece into the 20th century, a study of the effective evaluation of theatrical performance, and the modern business of theatre.

  
  • THEA 1005 - The Art of Sound (1CR)


    (1L) A study of the basic concepts of sound in the field of theatre, radio, television, internet and live performances. Learning the art form of sound and basic techniques of the equipment for recorded and live art. Topics include: under scoring, dialog, Foley, dramatic Audio, basics of microphones, mixers and sound systems. Editing equipment for audio production.

    Prerequisites: None
  
  • THEA 1010 - Fundamentals of Theatre Arts (3CR)


    (3L) [E] Designed to stimulate an interest in and appreciation of the role of the theatre in the modern world including a survey of major theatrical periods from the Golden Age of Greece into the 20th century, a study of the effective evaluation of theatrical performance, and the modern business of theatre.

 

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