Jun 19, 2024  
2020-2021 Academic Catalog and Student Handbook 
    
2020-2021 Academic Catalog and Student Handbook [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Humanities

  
  • HUMN 2045 - Asian Art and Culture (3CR)


    (3L) A survey of the visual arts produced in Asia and the Pacific region from the Neolithic era forward. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the cultural, political and/or religious significance of the works in addition to the styles and methods employed in their creation.

  
  • HUMN 2140 - World Literature I (3CR)


    (3L) Although primarily a study of the literature of the Classical Period of ancient Greece and Rome, some attention will be paid to the other arts, to religion, and to philosophy. Literary values and the qualities of the greatness of selected works of Western civilization, including any ideas embodied in those works, will be the focus.

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 .
    Cross-listed: (Cross-listed as ENGL 2140 .)
  
  • HUMN 2150 - World Literature II (3CR)


    (3L) Although primarily a study of the literature of the Middle Ages and beyond, attention will be paid to the other arts, to religion, and to philosophy. Literary values and the qualities of the greatness of selected works of Western Civilization, including any ideas embodied in those works, will be the focus. The class may also include works, including modern works, late in the semester.

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 .
    Cross-listed: (Cross-listed as ENGL 2150 .)
  
  • HUMN 2230 - Humanities in Europe: Study of the Origins of Western Culture (3CR)


    (3L) A study of the origins of Western culture by participating in Casper College’s “Humanities Program in Europe.” Students will read certain European literary classics before leaving for Europe (Decameron, Autobiography of Benvenuto Cellini, Life of St. Francis of Assisi, etc.). In Europe, students will take trips to historical and cultural sites, primarily in Florence, Italy and other nearby cities (Assisi, Rome, Venice, Pisa, etc.) in order to study Western cultural origins by directly experiencing the visual arts: painting, sculpture, and architecture. Lectures will be given in Europe in which an attempt will be made to integrate what students have read and experienced.

  
  • HUMN 2250 - Ideas in Ancient Literature, Greek, Roman, Hebrew


    (2-3L) (2-3CR) The study of representative literary classics selected from Greek, Roman and Hebrew literature.

  
  • HUMN 2251 - Ideas in Medieval Literature


    (2-3L) (2-3CR) The study of representative literary classics selected from Medieval literature.

  
  • HUMN 2252 - Ideas in Renaissance Literature


    (2-3L) (2-3CR) The study of representative literary classics selected from Renaissance literature.

  
  • HUMN 2253 - Ideas in Modern Literature


    (2-3L) (2-3CR) The study of representative literary classics selected from modern literature.

  
  • HUMN 2320 - The Quest for American Identity (3CR)


    (3L) This interdisciplinary seminar explores the question of what it means to be an American. By learning from earlier debates over immigration and the African American experience, we will shed light on the role of race and ethnicity in the quest for American identity in the postmodern era.

    Prerequisites: admission into the honors program.
  
  • HUMN 2425 - World Health (3CR)


    (3L) Health is defined by culture and is manifested in the daily life of a society through values, beliefs, health practices, family systems, finances, politics, education, arts and the environment. In addition, the ongoing issues of access, quality and cost of healthcare affect the health of individuals and communities. They also have an impact on the economy and the quality of life of a society. Students must enroll in the college tour attached to this course independently, to ensure travel arrangement to make this learning experience possible.

  
  • HUMN 2475 - Independent Reading in Humanistic Values


    (1-3CR) (Max. 6) of credit under the tutelage of an instructor who agrees to work with the student. The instructor may also require some written work from the student, but this is left to the instructor’s discretion.

  
  • HUMN 2485 - Seminar in Humanities: (Subtitle)


    (1-3L) (1-3CR) (Max. 12) Offered in answer to specific need or public interest. Includes intensive seminars with a concentrated focus.


Information Management

  
  
  • IMGT 2400 - Introduction to Information Management (3CR)


    (3L) [E] Concerned with managing the use of information systems to make organizations more competitive and efficient. Specific topics include organizational and technical foundation of information systems and building and managing systems.

    Prerequisites: COSC 1200 .
  
  • IMGT 2410 - Data Analytics (1CR)


    (.5L, 1LB) Students learn the fundamentals of data analytics with Tableau. Students will work with the Tableau desktop software to analyze specific scenarios and form conclusions based on the data. 


Insect Biology

  
  • ENTO 2005 - Insect Biology (4CR)


    (3L, 3LB) This course provides students with an introduction to insects and related arthropods. Aspects of insect biology, ecology, behavior and life history will be covered, with emphasis on their effect on humans. The lab will cover insect anatomy, taxonomy and diversity, with an insect collection required of all students.

    Prerequisites: BIOL 1000  or equivalent.

Instructional Technology

  
  
  • ITEC 2360 - Teaching with Technology (3CR)


    (3L) [E] Introduction to effective use of computers and other instructional technologies for instruction; software/hardware selection; integrated, professional, and instructional applications as applied to all areas and levels of P-12 education.

    Prerequisites: EDFD 2020  and EDCI 1500 .
  
  • ITEC 2525 - Teaching Online with Moodle (3CR)


    (2L, 2LB) The purpose of this course is to assist faculty in becoming more familiar with the Moodle Learning Management System (LMS). Faculty will study the skills required for constructing and delivering a course in the Moodle platform.


International Studies

  
  • INST 1200 - Non-Western Political Cultures (3CR)


    (3L) This course gives students an appreciation of non-Western political cultures and how these cultures have created different political institutions and practices. Non-Western nations of Asia, Africa, and the Middle East are used as case studies.

    Cross-listed: POLS 1200  
  
  • INST 2310 - Introduction to International Relations (3CR)


    (3L,) A theoretical and practical survey of the international political system, including concepts of power and power relationship, elements of international organizations and contemporary international relations.

    Prerequisites: Must have completed POLS 1000  or HIST 1120  or have permission of the instructor.
    Cross-listed: POLS 2310 
  
  • INST 2350 - Introduction to Global Studies (3CR)


    (3L) This course introduces students to the main components of the interdisciplinary major in International Studies and to provide preparation for further study of key issues related to globalization.


Internet

  
  
  • INET 1590 - Web Page Design (3CR)


    (2L, 2LB) This course is an introduction to web page authoring. Students develop basic skills in: designing, formatting, managing collections of related web pages, finding WWW resources, and publishing to a server. Extra laboratory work may be required. Windows and Word experience are recommended.

  
  • INET 1610 - Dynamic Web Graphics (3CR)


    (2L, 2LB) This course introduces students to dynamic web graphics. Upon completion of this course, participants will have the skills to design and deliver low-bandwidth dynamic websites that incorporate vector graphics with bitmaps, audio, animation, and advanced interactivity to create web experiences that attract and engage visitors. Keyboarding ability is recommended.

  
  • INET 1650 - Web Programming I (3CR)


    (2L, 2LB) This course covers the essential concepts of HTML, XML, CSS and beginning JavaScript. Students begin by developing a basic Web page and move on to developing a basic web site. Topics include: working with page design, tables, and frames, creating Web page forms; working with cascading style sheets using multimedia on the Web;HTML and elementary JavaScript; working with objects special effects; windows and frames, and forms.

  
  • INET 1885 - Adobe Photoshop for the Web (3CR)


    (2L, 2LB) This course will teach students key Photoshop concepts and techniques utilizing the industry standard digital imaging software, Adobe Photoshop CS3. Using clear, step-by-step, project based lessons, students will walk through the creation of a specific project with each class building on the student’s growing knowledge of the program. The information will be geared toward GUI (Graphic User Interface) specifically based on current WC3 web standards and best practices.

  
  • INET 1890 - Introduction to Web Design (3CR)


    (2L, 2LB) This course will allow students to explore and discuss, among many topics, the history of web design, web constraints and advantages, web vs print, design basics, site purpose/location/content, matrix design, accessibility, usability, style, look and feel, fixed vs liquid, liabilities, copyrights, inspiration and trends, etc. Students will also learn what is considered “good” vs “bad” in the subjective and ever-changing world of web design.

  
  • INET 1980 - Cooperative Work Experience


    1-3 (Max 6) Students will have the opportunity to gain on-the-job experience to improve and develop web design and development skills. Students will be supervised by the program coordinator and the hosting employer. A minimum of 80 hours of on-the-job training represents one semester hour of work. Students must maintain a 2.0 GPA during the semester for which they are enrolled in this course. 

    Prerequisites: Student must be a Web Design major and have permission of the instructor
  
  • INET 2665 - New Media Communication (3CR)


    (2L, 2LB) Students will receive an introduction into the field that includes all forms of computer-enhanced communication. They will be exposed to the possibilities of utilizing facets of this realm within business and marketing initiatives. Mediums such as television and radio stand to gain from the advantages of two-way dialogue with consumers primarily through the Internet. Examples include video games and virtual worlds as they impact marketing and public relations, multimedia CD-ROMs and DVDs, interactive websites, blogs and vblogs, podcasting, mobile devices, streaming video and streaming audio, online communities, and much more as the technology progresses.

    Prerequisites: permission of the instructor.
  
  • INET 2670 - Internet Ethics and Cyber Law (3CR)


    (3L) This course will discuss current statutes and possible future trends in Internet ethics and cyber law. We will discuss such topics as intellectual property law vs the first amendment, copyrights, trademarks and the Web, cookies, email privacy, censorship, seminal legal cases and much more.

  
  • INET 2675 - Web Design Business Fundamentals (3CR)


    (3L) This course will present proven techniques for building a successful web design business. It will include strategies to win more business and boost income and will assist students in overcoming the fear of selling themselves and their business. It will also offer practical advice on organizing a business and techniques to maximize revenue from existing and new clients.

    Prerequisites: permission of the instructor.
  
  • INET 2895 - Web Design Capstone/Seminar (3CR)


    (2L, 2LB) The student will participate in an individual or group class project whereas they research, design, construct and maintain a complete interactive website for a local nonprofit agency or group that is approved by the instructor. This will serve as a culminating activity implementing all appropriate modalities taught within the degree parameters. The website(s) will be handed over to the nonprofit at the end of the course free of charge for them to carry forward.

    Prerequisites: permission of the instructor.

Japanese

  
  • JAPN 0900 - Japanese for Travelers (1CR)


    (1L) This course uses a multi-skill approach; listening, speaking, reading and writing of vocabulary appropriate to travelers who visit Japanese-speaking areas. Students will also become familiar with the culture of Japan.

  
  • JAPN 1010 - First Year Japanese I (4CR)


    (4L) This course provides an introduction to the Japanese language through a multi-skill approach and understanding of the Japanese culture/society. Students who want to take for credit the next course in the sequence must complete this course with a grade of “C” or better.

  
  • JAPN 1020 - First Year Japanese II (4CR)


    (4L) This course is a continuation of JAPN 1010 . Students who want to take for credit the next course in the sequence must complete this course with a grade of “C” or better.

    Prerequisites: JAPN 1010 .
  
  • JAPN 2030 - Second Year Japanese I (4CR)


    (4L) [E] This course is a continuation of Japanese language study at a higher level. Students who want to take for credit the next course in the sequence must complete this course with a grade of “C” or better.

    Prerequisites: JAPN 1020 .

Kinesiology

  
  • KIN 1020 - Taping and Wrapping for Orthopedic Injuries (1CR)


    (2LB) This course introduces students to basic taping and wrapping techniques used to prevent and treat common orthopedic pathologies. Students will obtain both didactic information and practical application of taping and wrapping techniques, splinting and ambulatory devises, as well as guidelines for fitting protective equipment.

  
  • KIN 1052 - Introduction to Athletic Training (3CR)


    (3L) [E] The purpose of this course is to provide the prospective athletic trainer with the skill and knowledge necessary to implement a risk management and preventative program for athletes and others involved in physical activity.

  
  • KIN 1058 - Emergency Management of Athletic Injury/Illness (3CR)


    (3L) [E] The purpose of this course is to provide the prospective athletic trainer with the skill and knowledge necessary to provide for emergency care, triage, and management of emergencies and life-threatening situations for the physically active.

    Concurrently: Concurrent Enrollment in KIN 2068  is required
  
  • KIN 1960 - Kinesiology and Health Promotion Experience I (1CR)


    (2LB) This course introduces students to basics of Health Club / Fitness Center Operations.  Students will obtain both didactic information and practical application of the day to day operations in all areas of a Health Clubs / Fitness Centers.  Students will have experiences in each of the following areas: 1) Front Desk 2) Programming / Group Ex. / Fitness / Social 3) Facilities / Maintenance 4) Back of House / Business Operations 5) Sales / Marketing 6) Management. As needed

  
  • KIN 2050 - Functional Kinesiology (3CR)


    (2L, 2LB) Building from anatomy knowledge, this course provides a study of normal mechanics of human movement and functional limitations related to disabling conditions. Upper and lower extremity function is studied. Range of motion and manual muscle testing of kinesthetic movement are practiced. Neuroanatomy concepts related to disabling conditions are presented.

    Prerequisites: ZOO 2040 /ZOO 2041 .
  
  • KIN 2057 - Assessment and Evaluation of Athletic Injuries/Illness I (3CR)


    (3L) This course provides the prospective athletic trainer with the skill and knowledge necessary to evaluate and recognize upper extremity, cervical spine, and head injuries that occur to the athlete and the physically active.

  
  • KIN 2058 - Assessment and Evaluation of Athletic Injuries/Illness II (3CR)


    (3L) This course provides the prospective athletic trainer with the skill and knowledge necessary to evaluate and recognize lower extremity and spine injuries that occur to the athlete and physically active.

  
  • KIN 2068 - Athletic Training Clinical I (1CR)


    (2LB) This course provides clinical and field experience for the athletic training student. Skill and knowledge learned in KIN 1052 and KIN 1058 are applied in the clinical and field settings.

  
  • KIN 2078 - Athletic Training Clinical II (1CR)


    (2LB) This course provides clinical and field experience for the athletic training student. Skill and knowledge learned in KIN 1052 and KIN 1058 are applied in the clinical and field settings.

  
  • KIN 2098 - Athletic Training Clinical III (1CR)


    (2LB) This course provides clinical and field experience for the athletic training student. Skill and knowledge learned in KIN 1052, KIN 1058 and KIN 2057 are applied in the clinical and field settings.

  
  • KIN 2135 - Directed Study in Human Prosection (3CR)


    (1L, 4LB) In this course students will engage in detailed regional dissection of the human body with an emphasis on dissection techniques. It is designed to provide students who already have experience working with a human anatomical donor an additional opportunity to enhance their knowledge of human structure. The donor used for this course will serve as the prosection specimen in ZOO 2140 .

    Prerequisites: ZOO 2140 , or permission of the instructor.
  
  • KIN 2960 - Kinesiology and Health Promotion Experience II (2CR)


    (4LB) This course will build on the knowledge gained from KIN 1960. The students will pick 3 areas of the previous experience to get a more in depth training and instruction in each of those areas. As needed

    Prerequisites: KIN 1960: Kinesiology and Health Promotion Experience I
  
  • KIN 2970 - Kinesiology & Health Promotion Experience III (4CR)


    (8LB) This course provides a clinical / field internship experience where the student will be able to apply the skills and knowledge previously learned. This can be a rotating offering depending upon where the individual student is in their program

    Prerequisites: KIN 1960  and KIN 2960  

Legal Assistance

  
  • LEGL 1610 - Introduction to the Paralegal Profession (3CR)


    (3L) An introduction to the skills necessary to perform paralegal tasks such as briefing cases and interviewing clients. Will introduce students to substantive legal concepts, ethics, and to careers in the paralegal profession.

  
  • LEGL 1620 - Transactional Law (3CR)


    (3L) Transactional law for the paralegal covers contracts, corporations, probate, and real property skills necessary for the practicing paralegal. Students also participate in a job search seminar.

    Prerequisites: LEGL 1610 .
  
  • LEGL 1700 - Legal Analysis (3CR)


    (3L) Covers briefing, legal analysis, and synthesizing skills. Students will brief, analyze and synthesize cases on substantial law issues.

    Prerequisites: LEGL 1610  or concurrent enrollment.
  
  • LEGL 1710 - Legal Research and Writing I (3CR)


    (3L) Covers the basic tools of legal research: citation, federal and state decisions, digests, statutes, law reviews, the use of Shepard’s and Westlaw. Students complete research exercises and write an interoffice memorandum.

    Prerequisites: LEGL 1610 , or permission of the instructor.
  
  • LEGL 1720 - Legal Research and Writing II (3CR)


    (3L) Covers legal writing, fact investigation, interviewing fact witnesses, drafting witness statements and legal drafting.

    Prerequisites: LEGL 1710 .
  
  • LEGL 2500 - Civil Procedure (3CR)


    (3L) Uses the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure and the Wyoming Rules of Civil Procedure to teach service of process, filing, discovery, and execution of judgments. Includes the drafting of pleadings and discovery documents, digesting depositions, compiling a medical chronology and case management.

    Prerequisites: LEGL 1610 .
  
  • LEGL 2550 - Litigation Support (3CR)


    (3L) Covers substantive tort law in the framework of a trial. Students learn skills necessary to perform as litigation assistants by organizing a trial notebook, working with experts, preparing exhibits, and researching motions.

    Prerequisites: LEGL 2500 .
  
  • LEGL 2610 - Family Law (3CR)


    (3L) Covers the substantive law of domestic relations with specific emphasis on the role of the paralegal in these cases.

  
  • LEGL 2970 - Legal Assistant Internship


    (1-3CR) (Max. 6) Students are placed in a law firm, clerk’s office, public defender’s office, district attorney’s office, or other appropriate legal environment. Students will be provided the opportunity to work as paralegals under the supervision of a lawyer and the instructor.

    Prerequisites: LEGL 1710  and LEGL 2500 .
  
  • LEGL 2975 - Independent Studies for the Legal Assistant


    (1-3CR) (Max. 6) Faculty-guided research in areas of law relevant to a paralegal career. Students will be given the opportunity to research legal cases, law review articles and other materials. Students will be required to complete projects which will refine their paralegal skills.

    Prerequisites: LEGL 1710 .

Life Science

  
  • LIFE 1020 - Life Science (4CR)


    (3L, 3LB) [E] Life Science is an introductory course emphasizing principles of biology including cell structure and function, genetics, ecology, evolution and organismal biology. The applications of these principles to societal issues such as the conservation of biodiversity, overpopulation and global environmental changes, biotechnology, and human wellness and disease are also considered. This course fulfills a laboratory science requirement for non-biology majors such as those in the social and behavioral sciences, humanistic studies, etc.

    Concurrently: This course is a requirement of elementary education majors and should be taken prior to or concurrently with EDCI 1430 .
  
  • LIFE 2400 - General Ecology (3CR)


    (3L) [E] An introduction to the principles of ecology. Topics stressed include ecosystems, communities, populations, succession, aquatic and terrestrial habitats, natural selection, abiotic interactions, and speciation.

    Prerequisites: BIOL 1000 , BIOL 1010  or equivalent
    Cross-listed: BIOL 2400  
  
  • LIFE 2410 - Field Ecology I (2CR)


    (5LB) [E] A field and laboratory course to introduce research methods in general ecology. Includes required field trips.

    Prerequisites: BIOL 1010 , or permission of the instructor.
    Cross-listed: BIOL 2410  
  
  • LIFE 2480 - Cooperative Work Experience


    (1-8CR) This course provides the opportunity to gain life science and/or wildlife management concepts from a vocational or employment experience within the student’s area of specialization. A minimum of 80 hours of on-the-job training represents one semester credit hour. The instructor and the employer will supervise students.

    Prerequisites: Preapproval/consent of instructor; Life Sciences, Environmental Science, or Wildlife Management major. Students must have a 2.0 GPA.
    Cross-listed: ENR 2480  

     


Machine Tool Technology

  
  • MCHT 1570 - Machine Trades Computations (2CR)


    (2L) Practical application of mathematical problems and formulas directly related to the machine shop.

  
  • MCHT 1610 - Machine Tool Technology I (2CR)


    (1L, 2LB) An introduction to machine tools and processes. Includes theory and operation of the engine lathe, vertical and horizontal milling machines, bore development and conditioning, sawing, grinding, threading, layout, and machine maintenance.

  
  • MCHT 1620 - Machine Tool Technology II (2CR)


    (1L, 2LB) A continuation of MCHT 1610  with more complicated operations and in depth theory. Topics include shapers, indexing, boring, and broaching.

    Prerequisites: MCHT 1610 .
  
  • MCHT 1640 - Basic Machining Practice (10CR)


    (4L, 12LB) Introduction to bench work and machining processes. Includes work on saws, drilling machines, engine lathes, and milling machines.

  
  • MCHT 1650 - Intermediate Machining Practice (10CR)


    (4L, 12LB) A continuation of MCHT 1640  with more complicated machining operations and theory.

    Prerequisites: MCHT 1640 .
  
  • MCHT 1680 - Blueprint Reading (2CR)


    (2L) Introduces the student to the fundamentals of blueprint reading and freehand sketching as it applies to the machine shop.

  
  • MCHT 1700 - Introduction to CNC Plasma Operations (2CR)


    (1L)(2LB) An introduction to the operation and basic programming of the CNC Plasma cutting machine. Also covered will be a beginning class on simple CAD software (utilized with the plasma machine).

    Prerequisites: None
  
  • MCHT 1900 - Basic Machine Shop for Gunsmithing (4CR)


    (2L, 4LB) An introduction to machine tools and processes with an emphasis on gunsmithing applications. Class will include theory and operation of the lathe, milling machines, sawing, grinding, threading, layout, precision measuring devices and tool sharpening.

  
  • MCHT 1980 - Cooperative Work Experience (Machine Shop)


    (1-8CR) (Max. 8) On-the-job training with a cooperative machine shop. Weekly work reports and 80 hours of work for each hour of credit.

    Prerequisites: permission of the instructor.
  
  • MCHT 2650 - Advanced Machining Practice (5CR)


    (2L, 6LB) Advanced theory and machine operation for second year students.

    Prerequisites: MCHT 1650
  
  • MCHT 2680 - Metallurgy (3CR)


    (2L, 2LB) Introduction in different grain structures of commonly used metals and their reaction to heat treatment, welding, machining, surface treatments, and mechanical stress.  Various laboratory exercises on stress relief, shrinkage, fatigue, and cooling rates will be presented. The course is designed for anyone interested in welding, machining or technical education requiring knowledge of classification and characteristics of metals.

  
  • MCHT 2780 - Computer Numerical Control (CNC) Machining Center (4CR)


    (2L, 4LB) An introductory course in 3-axis CNC machining center programming and 2-axis CNC plasma cutter programming. The course is structured so no prior experience with CNC machining center or CNC plasma programming or operation is required. The time will be divided between classroom and shop.

  
  • MCHT 2790 - Computer Numerical Control (CNC) Turning Center (4CR)


    (2L, 4LB) An introductory course in two-axis CNC turning center programming. The course is structured so no prior experience with CNC lathe programming or operation is required. The time will be divided between classroom and shop.

  
  • MCHT 2800 - Computer Assisted Manufacturing (3CR)


    (2L, 2LB) Computer applications in programming machine tools. CNC Machining Center and CNC plasma cutter software will be used to acquaint students with CAD/CAM systems.

  
  • MCHT 2965 - Directed Studies


    (1-2CR) (Max. 8) An option for students with sufficient background to pursue special problems in the machine shop under contract with the instructor.

    Prerequisites: MCHT 1610  and permission of the instructor.

Management

  
  • MGT 1000 - Introduction to Supervision (2CR)


    (2L) A practical course in business supervision covering communication, attitude perception and modification, group dynamics, orientation and training, discipline, grievances, and termination. Role playing is emphasized as a learning tool.

    Prerequisites: BADM 1000  or MGT 2100 , or permission of the instructor.
  
  • MGT 2050 - Leading Organizational Change (3CR)


    (3L) This class will combine leadership concepts with models of organizational change. Change will be examined at the individual, team, and organizational or systems level. The focus is on uncovering traps that create stress, waste resources, slow change efforts, or lead to outright failure and discovering how to lead, cope and win in the face of great change. Class participants become familiar with a variety of change models as they are utilized in real organizations attempting change. The class will examine how organizational culture is an ever-present barrier to lasting change and how that impacts the decision on the part of organizations to initiate change.

    Prerequisites: MGT 2100  and completion of or concurrent enrollment in MGT 2150 .
  
  • MGT 2100 - Principles of Management (3CR)


    (3L) [E] Analyzes objectives, policies, organizational structure, material and human resource utilization, human relations, planning, innovating, and controlling as management responsibilities. Students also study and discuss current activities in specific areas of business and industry.

  
  • MGT 2110 - Organizational Behavior (3CR)


    (3L) This is an introductory course exposing students to theoretical assumptions of organizational change. Students will be introduced to such topics as organizational structure, recruitment, retention and succession planning, employee motivation, and diversity and culture within the workplace. Students will explore how diversity and culture impact individuals, organizations and society. Students will learn practical operations of recruiting, retention and development of employees by focusing on matching employees’ needs and aspirations within the organization. They will study the different types of organizational structures and their influence on organizational intelligence, employee development, learning and performance.

    Prerequisites: MGT 2100 .
  
  • MGT 2150 - Leadership (3CR)


    (3L) This course will focus on the application of leadership skills in the classroom and in the context of management. There will be a thorough study of leadership theory up to the present, with a focus on how this theory has to be modified to accommodate our changing global environment in business. This course will also focus on how leadership will play a role in restructuring of our organizations, both profit and nonprofit, as business moves into the 21st century.

    Prerequisites: MGT 1000 , MGT 2100 , or permission of the instructor.
  
  • MGT 2200 - Strategic Human Resource Management (3CR)


    (3L) Designed to present the methods, functions, and techniques of personnel administration. Emphasis is placed in recruiting, interviewing, selecting, placement, training, and evaluation of personnel. Class discussions and projects will include topics of job design and analysis, compensation and benefit administration, human resource planning, and union/management relations.

    Prerequisites: MGT 2100 , or permission of the instructor.
  
  • MGT 2480 - Cooperative Work Experience (Management)


    (1-3CR) (Max. 6) Students are afforded the opportunity to gain practical, on-the-job experience in their specialties. Students will be supervised by the program coordinator and the employer. A minimum of 80 hours of on-the-job training represents one semester hour. Students must maintain 12 credit hours with a 2.0 GPA during the semester.-

    Prerequisites: full-time management major and permission of the program coordinator.

Manufacturing

  
  • MANF 1060 - Excel Technical Applications (3CR)


    (3L) This course will focus on the technical application of Microsoft Excel and its use in an engineering/drafting office environment. Students will learn productivity tools in Excel and explore how to integrate Excel with computer aided drafting software to increase productivity.

    Cross-listed: ENTK 1060
  
  • MANF 1610 - Introduction to Robotics (2CR)


    (4LB) Students will explore the principles of robotics by building, programming, and modifying a robot. Students will gain experience in the following areas: fabrication, electronics, computer programming, physics, and teamwork.

  
  • MANF 1616 - Robot Construction (2CR)


    (4LB) Advanced class in robotics. Students will be working on complex projects in designing, building, and programming a robot. Students will gain advanced experience in fabrication, electronics, computer programming, physics, and teamwork.

  
  • MANF 2525 - Design and Manufacturing Methods (4CR)


    (2L, 4LB) A course emphasizing solid modeling and manufacturing techniques involved with various CNC equipment and the impacts of CAD on design and production. Manufacturing techniques utilizing CNC plasma, CNC router, laser engraver, machining/turning center and 3D printer will be covered in this course.

    Concurrently: ENTK 2510  or instructor approval.
    Cross-listed: ENTK 2525  
  
  • MANF 2550 - Automation Control (3CR)


    (2L, 3LB) Students will design, assemble, and program an automated system. Every other spring semester

    Prerequisites: ELTR 2815 and ENTK 2525 or Permission of Instructor
  
  • MANF 2690 - Robot Welding (4CR)


    (2L, 4LB) Students will learn the fundamentals of safely programming a robot for welding applications.

    Prerequisites: WELD 1770  or WELD 1820  or permission of the instructor.
  
  • MANF 2975 - Independent Study Manufacturing


    (1-3CR) Manufacturing majors who have completed the introductory courses may be permitted to contract with the instructor for special advanced problems in manufacturing applications.

    Prerequisites: Sophomore standing and permission of instructor.

Marketing

  
  
  
  • MKT 1010 - Sales and Customer Relationship Management (3CR)


    (3L) A survey of the principles and methods of the selling process and customer relationship management strategies.  Covers topics needed to develop and manage long-term relationships with customers and suppliers.  An emphasis is placed on relationship selling, presentation, prospecting, handling objectives, closing techniques, customer service, and service recovery strategies.

    Prerequisites: None
  
  • MKT 1100 - Retailing (3CR)


    (3L) The fundamentals of retail store organization and management such as the types of retail stores, site selection, store layout, pricing, display, promotion, and personnel policies.

  
  • MKT 1300 - Integrated Marketing Communication (3CR)


    (3L) National, regional, and local media, layouts, and promotional policies.

  
  • MKT 2000 - Introduction to Digital Marketing(3CR)


    (3L) This course will teach students about the ever-changing world of e-marketing on the internet.  The internet is the first marketing tool on earth that allows for instant networking to billions of potential customers within a personalized relationship model.  As businesses all over the world transitions their marketing resources to take advantage of this phenomenon, e-marketing has become a necessary and powerful tool.  Students will incorporate contemporary software platforms related to digital marketing and apply foundational knowledge as it relates to the foundation of e-commerce, the role of independent third-parties, security standards and payment systems and software.

  
  • MKT 2100 - Principles of Marketing (3CR)


    (3L) [E] Management’s approach to analyzing and solving problems in product planning, pricing, promotion, and distribution of goods and services. Consumer orientation and marketing’s key role in profitable business operations are emphasized.

 

Page: 1 <- 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13