Mar 29, 2023  
2020-2021 Academic Catalog and Student Handbook 
    
2020-2021 Academic Catalog and Student Handbook [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Engineering Technology

  
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    ENTK 2980 - Cooperative Work Experience (Drafting)


    (1-8CR) (Max. 8) A minimum of 80 hours of on-the-job training per credit hour with college supervision. Training must be in the area of drafting or a closely related field such as surveying.

    Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

English

  
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    ENGL 0800 - Introduction to College Reading and Writing I (5CR)


    (5L) Reading and writing are both processes of composing and are requisites to success in all college courses. This first level developmental English course provides instruction for critical reading and critical thinking skills used to compose a variety of effective writings. Students will have the opportunity to practice writing skills, review grammar and mechanics, read a variety of materials, and learn methods of responding to readings.

    Prerequisites: Acceptable placement score.
  
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    ENGL 0850 - Accelerated Writing and Reading (5CR)


    (5L) This course will combine the skills learned in ENGL 800 and ENGL 900. Combined writing skills seeks to strengthen the student’s writing fluency through a study of selected elements of basic composition. These include grammar, spelling, and punctuation as well as sentence development, paragraph development, and essay development. The course introduces students to different patterns of organization and various types of writings through assigned readings and multiple-draft writing assignments.

    Prerequisites: Acceptable placement score or completion of the pre-requisite course with a “C” or better.
  
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    ENGL 0900 - Introduction to College Reading and Writing II (4CR)


    (4L) Reading and writing are both processes of composing and are requisites to success in ENGL 1010. This upper level developmental English course provides instruction for active reading and critical thinking skills used to compose effective essays. Students will have opportunities to practice a recursive writing process and will be introduced to using outside texts as a way to generate ideas. Students are given the option of receiving S/U grades. Students receiving “C” or better in any 1000 or 2000 level English course may not subsequently earn credit in ENGL 0900.

    Prerequisites: Acceptable placement score or completion of ENGL 0800  with a “C” or better.
  
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    ENGL 0910 - Enhancement for Comp 1 (3CR)


    (3L) ENGL 910 is a course devoted to improving students’ writing and critical reading as a corequisite to ENGL 1010. This course provides intensive instruction writing expository essays for specific audiences as well as instruction in reading and working with college level texts.  It emphasizes the process of drafting, revising, and editing, as well as comprehending and interpreting a variety of texts.This course enables students who place into the higher level developmental English to complete the college level composition sequence more quickly.

    Students are given the option of receiving S/U grades. Students receiving “C” or better in any 1000 or 2000 level English course may not subsequently earn credit in ENGL 0910.  Fall and Spring semesters

    Prerequisites: Acceptable placement score or a grade of “C” or higher in ENGL 0800.
    Concurrently: Students enrolled in this course must be concurrently enrolled in the corresponding section of ENGL 1010

  
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    ENGL 1010 - English Composition I (3CR)


    (3L) [E] A study of the fundamentals of purposeful communication in English. The course focuses on reading and writing expository essays, on using effective language for exposition of ideas, and on thinking clearly. Students are to practice synthesizing information, organizing it coherently, and writing clearly.

    Prerequisites: Acceptable placement score or completion of ENGL 0850  or ENGL 0900  with a “C” or better.
  
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    ENGL 1020 - English Composition II (3CR)


    (3L) An extension of ENGL 1010 . Further refines the student’s abilities to gather and synthesize material from independent reading. Students study language both to appreciate its precise control and to interpret the experience of others. College-level essays (including a research paper) and two oral presentations are required.

    Prerequisites: A grade of “C” or higher in ENGL 1010 .
  
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    ENGL 1040 - Intro to Creative Writing (3CR)


    (3L) A study and workshop in the technique of the craft of writing poetry, fiction, non-fiction, and drama for the purpose of self-expression and cultural understanding. As needed

  
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    ENGL 2005 - Writing in Technology and the Sciences (3CR)


    (3L) [E] Technical Writing further refines the student’s abilities to gather and synthesize material from independent reading. In addition the course develops writing styles and techniques, document design and formats, and audiences/readership considerations specifically suited to technological and scientific fields of study. Two oral presentations that incorporate visual rhetoric. The course concludes with a student directed research proposal or other research project, culminating in one of the two required presentations.

    Prerequisites: A grade of “C” or higher in ENGL 1010  within the last ten years.
  
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    ENGL 2006 - Environmental Literature (3CR)


    (3L) Environmental literature is a survey course that will explore the major environmental texts and some of the writers of our time. Students interested in nature writing, literature and environmental politics will appreciate this course. Essay writing and group work will be required to complete this study.

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 . ENGL 1020  recommended.
  
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    ENGL 2011 - Literature for Young Adults (3CR)


    (3L) This course will be a study of the origin, development, and cultural underpinnings of the field of Young Adult fiction, and an overview of many of the subgenres of the field.

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 .
  
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    ENGL 2045 - Conferencing with Writers (3CR)


    (3L) This course covers methodology of one-to-one and one-to-small group writing tutoring. The course introduces writing tutors to the education principles and Writing Center goals underlying common tutoring techniques. Topics addressed are theories of learning, principles of memory, learning styles, successful tutoring techniques, online tutoring, and writing across the curriculum. Writing tutors will observe and participate in tutoring sessions in the Casper College, UW/CC Writing Center. This course is required for, but not restricted to, Writing Center Staff. Non-Writing Center staff must make arrangements with the director to provide for alternative tutoring situations.

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 . ENGL 1020  recommended.
  
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    ENGL 2046 - Conferencing with Writers II (3CR)


    (3L) This course is a continuation of ENGL 2045  and covers theories underlying one-to-one and small group responses to writing. The course introduced writing tutors to writing center and peer tutor theories that inform uniformly accepted best practices. Topics addressed are theoretical constructs of collaboration, interpersonal dynamics, responding to students and student texts, and online tutoring. This course is required for, but not restricted to, Writing Center staff. Non-Writing Center staff must make arrangements with the director to provide for alternative tutoring situations.

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 . ENGL 1020  recommended.
  
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    ENGL 2050 - Creative Writing: Fiction (3CR)


    (3L) [E] Analysis of the elements of fiction and practice of writing fiction at the introductory and intermediate level.

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 . ENGL 1020  recommended.
  
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    ENGL 2055 - Creative Writing: Writing in the Wild (3CR)


    (3L) Student-centered, week-long field experience in Yellowstone National Park focuses on reading and writing imaginative verse and prose inspired by nature. Class days are devoted to collecting journal observations during daily hikes, engaging in a variety of writing exercises, and discussing readings and each other’s writing. The course culminates in the submission of a writing portfolio.

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010  or permission of the instructor, alert senses, and the ability to hike moderate distances (6-12 miles a day) over uneven terrain. ENGL 1020  recommended.
  
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    ENGL 2060 - Creative Writing: Nonfiction (3CR)


    (3L) As the enormous popularity of national bestsellers demonstrate, the creative nonfiction genre has far-reaching appeal for the millions of readers. In this course the student will analyze the elements of nonfiction and practice writing nonfiction at the introductory and intermediate level.

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 . ENGL 1020  recommended.
  
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    ENGL 2080 - Creative Writing: Poetry (3CR)


    (3L) [E] Analysis of the forms of poetry, and practice of writing poetry at the introductory and intermediate level.

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 . ENGL 1020  recommended.
  
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    ENGL 2130 - Creative Impulse (Twentieth Century Humanities) (3CR)


    (3L) [E] Focuses on the visual arts, literature, music, and philosophy of the 20th century. Attention is given to the influence of history upon our culture and the changes in thinking brought about by scientific discovery.

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 . ENGL 1020  recommended.
  
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    ENGL 2140 - World Literature I (3CR)


    (3L)  

    Exploring literature from a wide array of time periods and language backgrounds, this course examines great works of world literature, ancient and modern. This course also engages themes as explored through various time periods, cultures, and visual genres like cinema and the visual arts. Through discussion and analysis, this course explores the diverse ways that cultures attempt to express themselves through written and artistic expression.

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 . ENGL 1020  recommended.
    Cross-listed: (Cross-listed as HUMN 2140 .)

  
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    ENGL 2145 - War Literature (3CR)


    (3L) War stories exist at the nexus of two fundamental human drives: the drive to create, and the drive to destroy. In an effort to better understand these human impulses, students in War Literature will examine a range of texts that deal with complex, multivalent experiences of war. Texts will include letters, poems, stories, songs, speeches, propaganda, and film.

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 . ENGL 1020  recommended.
  
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    ENGL 2150 - World Literature II (3CR)


    (3L) Although primarily a study of the literature of the Middle Ages and beyond, attention will be paid to the other arts, to religion, and to philosophy. Literary values and the qualities of the greatness of selected works of Western Civilization, including any ideas embodied in those works, will be our focus. We may include works, including modern works, late in the semester.

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 . ENGL 1020  recommended.
    Cross-listed: (Cross-listed as HUMN 2150 .)
  
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    ENGL 2185 - Classical Mythology (3CR)


    (3L) Focuses on Greek myth and legend. Included as background are geography, history, excerpts from literature, and theories of interpretation.

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 . ENGL 1020  recommended.
  
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    ENGL 2205 - Intro to Literature (3CR)


    (3L) Introduction to Literature further refines the student’s abilities to gather and synthesize material from independent reading. The course focuses on teaching the specific skills, techniques, and terminology necessary for writing effectively about literature and writing literary criticism. This course will devote significant time to the discussion of writing and to its application in addition to engaging students with a variety of readings that may come from a variety of literary periods and movements. College- level essays, including a research paper and, and two oral presentations are required.

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010  
    Concurrently: ENGL 1020  
  
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    ENGL 2210 - English Literature I (3CR)


    (3L) A survey of British literature from the Anglo-Saxons to the 18th century. Emphasis is on reading, discussing, and writing about important works in our literary heritage.

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 . ENGL 1020  recommended.
  
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    ENGL 2220 - English Literature II (3CR)


    (3L) A survey of British literature from the early 19th century to the modern period. Emphasis is on reading, discussing, and writing about important works in our literary heritage.

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 . ENGL 1020  recommended.
  
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    ENGL 2230 - Intro to Shakespeare (3CR)


    (3L) Students are introduced to the works of Shakespeare through careful reading (and re-reading) of representative major plays and/or sonnets in order to become acquainted with Shakespeare’s dramatic and poetical art. Both formal lecture and discussion will cover each reading. From time to time the class will watch tapes of scenes from the plays in order to understand how the plays might be staged and actors interpret roles. In addition to reading between eight and 12 plays and a dozen or so sonnets, students will take mid-term and final objective and essay examinations, report on the interpretation by a major critic (Johnson, Coleridge, Hazlitt, Bradley, Harrison, and so on), and write one short and one extended (possibly research) essay.

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 . ENGL 1020  recommended.
  
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    ENGL 2235 - Literature of Horror (3CR)


    (3L) [E] A study of the development and traditions, and conventions of horror and the supernatural in English and American literature. Readings will consist mostly of prose fiction, though there will be a few assigned readings of non-fiction.

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 . ENGL 1020  recommended.
  
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    ENGL 2270 - Modern Women Writers (3CR)


    (3L) An introductory level course, which will focus on women writers of the late 19th century and of the 20th century. Works by earlier writers demonstrate the traditional roles of women in society as well as questions about and challenges to those roles, while works written since the middle of the 20th century image women in a changing society. These works are the background to contemporary literature which presents positive and powerful images of women as recent writers revise traditional roles and envision new realities for women and for society.

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 . ENGL 1020  recommended.
  
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    ENGL 2310 - American Literature I (3CR)


    (3L) A survey of major American writers and their significant contributions from the Colonial Era to the Civil War.

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 . ENGL 1020  recommended.
  
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    ENGL 2320 - American Literature II (3CR)


    (3L) A continuation of ENGL 2310 : American writers from the Civil War to the mid-20th Century.

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 . ENGL 1020  recommended.
  
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    ENGL 2350 - African American Literature (3CR)


    (3L) A chronological and thematic survey of African American writers and their works, from the earliest slave narratives to contemporary writings. This course will explore one specific sector of the diversity of American literature.

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 . ENGL 1020  recommended.
  
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    ENGL 2440 - Literary Genres: Short Story (3CR)


    (3L) [E] A study of several short stories with emphasis on the development of the genre as a modern art form, from its structural crystallization in the early 19th century to the experimental techniques of the latter 20th century.

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 . ENGL 1020  recommended.
  
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    ENGL 2475 - Independent Study


    (*1-3CR) (Max. 6) *Individual appointments with instructor. Books and periodicals studied independently by student in consultation with instructor.

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 . ENGL 1020  recommended.
  
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    ENGL 2495 - Workshop: (Subtitle)


    (.5-2CR) (Max. 4) Offered in response to needs and interests of students and members of the community. The topic varies but focuses on reading, writing and analyzing contemporary literature. Guest scholars and writers give lectures, readings, and workshops about different genres including poetry, fiction, and nonfiction. A student may repeat this course twice under different subtitles to a maximum of four credit hours.

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 . ENGL 1020  recommended.

English as a Second Language

  
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    ESL 0100 - English as a Second Language Level I


    (1-3CR) This individualized, self-paced course for students whose native language is not English provides instruction and practice in reading, grammar, writing, listening, and speaking at a high-beginning to low-intermediate level of English proficiency. S, X, or U grade only.

  
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    ESL 0200 - English as a Second Language Level II


    (1-3CR) This individualized, self-paced course for students whose native language is not English provides instruction and practice in reading, grammar, writing, listening, and speaking at a low-intermediate to intermediate level of English proficiency. S, X, or U grade only.

  
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    ESL 0300 - English as a Second Language Level III


    (1-3CR) This individualized, self-paced course for students whose native language is not English provides instruction and practice in reading, grammar, writing, listening, and speaking at an intermediate to high-intermediate level of English proficiency. S, X, or U grade only.

  
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    ESL 1000 - Conversational English for ESL Students (1CR)


    (1L) Conversational English for ESL is designed to accompany coursework in ESL 1010  and ESL 1020 . It gives students the opportunity to interact verbally, overcome the tendency to “translate directly” and to discuss texts and current events. It includes listening as well as speaking, and will include recorded materials as well as assignments to live lectures. It is accessible to ESL students at a variety of levels who come to college from varied cultures and linguistic backgrounds. Preferred: TOEFL score of 350 or higher. Experience with oral and written English.

  
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    ESL 1010 - English as a Second Language I (4CR)


    (4L) Intermediate level international students and students with limited English proficiency will earn four credits in reading, listening, grammar, and writing. Students will interact with one or two instructors, read English texts, write and edit responses, and participate in discussions of texts and/or related issues. Students are encouraged to enroll in ESL 1000 , Conversational English for ESL Students.

    Prerequisites: Permission of instructors. Preferred: TOEFL score of 350 or better; successful completion of introductory ESL courses.
  
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    ESL 1020 - English as a Second Language II (4CR)


    (4L) High intermediate/low advanced level international students and students with limited English proficiency will earn four credits in reading, grammar, and writing. Students will interact with one or two instructors, read English texts, write and edit responses, and participate in discussions of texts and/or related issues. Students are encouraged to enroll in ESL 1000 .

    Prerequisites: Permission of instructors. Preferred: TOEFL score of 400 or better; successful completion of introductory ESL courses.

Environment and Natural Resources

  
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    ENR 1200 - Environment (4CR)


    (3L, 3LB) This course fulfills a lab science requirement for both science and non-science majors by introducing key concepts in the life sciences through analysis of environmental and natural resource issues. It is appropriate for all students seeking a deeper understanding of environmental challenges. This course is intended to cultivate informed citizens capable of understanding both the scientific basis of environmental challenges as well as an appreciation for the importance of the non-scientific dimensions of those challenges. This course uses complex, real-world environmental challenges to explore fundamental scientific principles such as hypothesis testing, energy flow, nutrient cycling, ecosystem structure and function, population ecology, community ecology, and the role of humans in systems.

     

  
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    ENR 1500 - Water, Dirt, and Earth’s Environment (4CR)


    (3L, 3LB) Introductory environmental geology course focusing on water and soil both as hazards and as life-sustaining resources; exploring surface processes and climate change over geological and human timescales. Case studies illustrate the environmental tradeoffs of resource use.

    Cross-listed: (Cross-listed with GEOL 1500 )
  
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    ENR 2000 - Environment and Society (3CR)


    (3L) This course explores environmental and social interactions-that is, how we relate to non-human nature and how we represent these relationships. During the semester you will evaluate texts and other media from a variety of fields. We will also address some of the core issues impacting the relationship between the environment and society.

  
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    ENR 2450 - Principles of Fish and Wildlife Management (3CR)


    (3L) [E] Emphasizes principles of habitat and population biology and management, human dimensions of wildlife management, as well as law and policy.

    Prerequisites: LIFE 1010/  
    Cross-listed: ZOO 2450
  
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    ENR 2465 - Research Problems in Environmental Sciences


    (1-4CR) (Max 4) This is an independent research study course. A comprehensive research study is required. Upon completing the project, the student should present a paper and an oral seminar to a committee selected by the project instructor. The problem and amount of credit received must have the approval of the instructor.

  
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    ENR 2480 - Cooperative Work Experience


    (1-8CR) This course provides the opportunity to gain life science and/or wildlife management concepts from a vocational or employment experience within the student’s area of specialization. A minimum of 80 hours of on-the-job training represents one semester credit hour. The instructor and the employer will supervise students.

     

    Prerequisites: Preapproval/consent of instructor. Must be Life Science, Environmental Science, or Wildlife Management Major. Student must have at least a 2.0 GPA.


Environmental Science

  
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    ENVT 1500 - Applied Math for Operators (2CR)


    (2L) Practical and realistic applications of mathematical formulas and problems related to the operations of water and wastewater treatment plants and collection and distribution systems.

    Prerequisites: MATH 0930 , or permission of the instructor.
  
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    ENVT 1510 - Distribution Systems (3CR)


    (3L) Introduction to the basics of distribution system operation and maintenance and key system components. Topics covered include storage, cross connections, water quality, regulations, chlorination, piping, meter, pumps, hydrants and safety.

  
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    ENVT 1520 - Collection System Operation/Maintenance (3CR)


    (3L) Introduction to the basics of collection system operation and maintenance and key system components. Topics to be covered include inspecting and testing, cleaning methods, lift stations, safety and administration.

  
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    ENVT 1530 - Trenching and Shoring (1CR)


    (1L) Introduction to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s Construction regulation subpart P: Excavations 1926.650-652 known as the Trenching and Shoring Rule. Topics covered are causes of cave-ins, soil classifications, determining soil types and protection systems.

  
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    ENVT 1540 - Confined Spaces (1CR)


    (1L) Introduction to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s (OSHA) permit required confined space entry regulation. Class focuses on understanding the regulations and the required elements of a confined space program.

  
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    ENVT 1550 - Safety in Water Quality (2CR)


    (2L) Introduction to safety issues that affect water quality system operators. The course will review general safety issues and specific Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) regulations. Topics to be covered include hazard communication, blood borne pathogens, chemical safety, respiratory protection, lockout-tag out, and general safety practices.

  
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    ENVT 1560 - Water Treatment Plant Operation I (3CR)


    (3L) This course is an introduction to the basics of water treatment plant operation and key system components. Includes water sources, coagulation, flocculation, sedimentation, filtration, disinfection, Safe Drinking Water Act rules and regulations, fluoridation and iron and manganese removal.

  
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    ENVT 1570 - Wastewater Treatment Plant Operation I (3CR)


    (3L) Introduction to the basics of wastewater plant operation and maintenance. Topics covered include package plants, oxidation ditches, waste stabilization ponds, trickling filters, primary and preliminary treatment and chlorination.

  
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    ENVT 1600 - Industrial Safety (4CR)


    (4L) This course is an introduction to safety issues that affect personnel in the electric power industry. It will review general safety issues and specific Occupational Safety and Health (OSHA) regulations for General Industry. Topics to be covered include: Introduction to OSHA, exit routes, emergency action plans, fire protection plans and fire protection, electrical, personal protective equipment, walking/working surfaces and fall protection, hazard communication, powered industrial trucks, bloodborne pathogens, working in extreme weather environments, and electric power generation, transmission, and distribution. All subjects will emphasize hazard awareness. An OSHA Ten-Hour general industry card will be awarded to all students successfully completing the mandatory OSHA requirements contained in this curriculum. Each student will be required to compose a three to five page essay on personal safety.

  
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    ENVT 1625 - Small Water Systems (3CR)


    (3L) This course is an introduction to the basics of small water system operation and maintenance and key system components. Topics to be covered include surface water treatment, groundwater systems, storage, monitoring, emergency response preparedness, financial considerations and managerial responsibilities. Course uses a combination of DVD based video presentations and workbook assignments completed at home prior to class as well as classroom lectures and field trips.

  
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    ENVT 1650 - Waste Stabilization Ponds/Lagoons Operation and Maintenance (1CR)


    (1L) This course will cover wastewater composition, lagoon types, facultative and aerated lagoon operational theory, dissolved oxygen and pH measurement, calculating hydraulic and organic loading, detention time, geometric mean, average flow and percent removal and NPDES permits. Course will also include a field trip to a local lagoon system.

  
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    ENVT 2510 - Applied Math for Water Plant Operators (2CR)


    (2L) Practical and realistic applications of mathematical formulas and problems related to the operations of a water treatment plant and distribution system.

    Prerequisites: ENVT 1500 , or permission of the instructor.
  
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    ENVT 2515 - Applied Math for Wastewater Plant Operators (2CR)


    (2L) Practical and realistic applications of mathematical formulas and problems related to the operations of a wastewater treatment plant and collection system. Processes covered will include activated sludge, trickling filters, waste stabilization ponds, chemical dosages and laboratory calculations.

    Prerequisites: ENVT 1500 , or permission of the instructor.
  
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    ENVT 2525 - Water Treatment Plant Operation II (3CR)


    (3L) Builds on the concepts presented in Water Treatment Plant Operation I and introduces advanced treatment concepts such as softening, iron manganese control, demineralization, instrumentation, laboratory procedures and drinking water regulations.

  
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    ENVT 2535 - Wastewater Treatment Plant Operation II (3CR)


    (3L) Builds on the concepts presented in Wastewater Treatment Plant Operations I and introduces advanced treatment concepts such as sludge handling and digestion and nutrient removal.

  
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    ENVT 2981 - Cooperative Work Experience


    (1-8CR) (Max. 16) (Environmental Science students) Supervised work and project experience for the purpose of providing an understanding of a specific topic area related to environmental science. Supervision is provided by both the instructional staff of the college and the cooperating agencies. Enrollment limited to majors in water quality technology or environmental science. See “Unit of Credit.”

    Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

Exceptional Children

  
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    EDEX 2484 - Intro to Special Education (3CR)


    (3L) [E] This course is designed to meet the needs of education majors for a required course in special education. It provides a broad overview of effective intervention models of instruction and/or behavior techniques for special needs students within an inclusion setting and/or other continuum of special education options which meet the least restrictive environment. Finally, this class would be helpful for individuals in other fields who need an introduction to the field of special education.

    Prerequisites: EDFD 2020 , ITEC 2360  and PSYC 2300 .

Extractive Resources

  
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    EXTR 1500 - Geology of Extractive Resources (3CR)


    (3L) The study of the basic concepts associated with understanding the geology of the occurrence of oil, gas, oil shale, coal, coal bed methane, uranium, trona, bentonite, industrial minerals, and precious minerals in Wyoming.

  
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    EXTR 2510 - Introduction to Well Drilling (3.5CR)


    (3L, 1LB) An introduction to the basics of drilling in the extractive industries. Topics will include an overview of the purpose, type and mechanics of drilling. Emphasis will be placed on Wyoming industries such as oil and gas, coal bed methane, uranium, and soda ash. The type and size of various rigs will be discussed. Drilling operations including the selection of rigs, bits, well control, and logging will be introduced. The course will include the discussion of casing runs, cementing, and a brief introduction to completion operations.

    Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.
  
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    EXTR 2520 - Introduction to Well Logging (3CR)


    (3L) An introduction to the basics of modern electric well logs. Topics will include a quick overview of how a well is drilled and a brief history of logging tools. The main focus will be on modern electric log types and their interpretation and application, including resistivity and porosity logs. Specialty logs including dipmeters and borehole televiewers will be examined.

  
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    EXTR 2530 - Oil and Gas Production (3.5CR)


    (3L, 1LB) An introduction to the basics of oil and gas production. Topics will include a quick overview of the history of production, oil and gas reservoirs, drilling, testing, and completing wells. The main focus will be on oil and gas properties, production methods, enhanced recovery methods, field processing, and well maintenance.

    Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.
  
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    EXTR 2540 - Petroleum Refining (3CR)


    (3L) This course will cover the process, technology and operations that are necessary for the refinement of petroleum products.

    Prerequisites: EXTR 2530 .
  
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    EXTR 2550 - Geologic Computing Methods (3CR)


    (1.5L, 3LB) This course is a beginner to intermediate level instructional course on how to use the geologic mapping software, Petra. Topics will include utilization of the various modules that comprise the Petra software (i.e. the mapping module, cross section module, etc.). Advanced subjects will include uses of other software such as Microsoft Office to facilitate data manipulation and integration into Petra. Basic computing skills recommended.

  
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    EXTR 2555 - Advanced Geologic Computing Methods (3CR)


    (1.5, 3LB) This course is intended as a follow-up to EXTR 2550 Geologic Computing Methods. It is an advanced level instructional course on how to use the geologic computing software package, Petra. The course will feature advanced methods of geologic mapping, cross-section creation, well log interpretation, and the many special functions of the software. Data manipulation and integration techniques will be addressed.

    Prerequisites: EXTR 2550  or permission of the instructor.
  
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    EXTR 2560 - Energy Policy and Economics (3CR)


    (3L) Introduction to energy policy and economics. This course is designed to provide the student a basic understanding of the energy industry, current socioeconomic and political conditions in the marketplace and future supply/demand scenarios based on policy initiatives. The student will be exposed to material through a large degree of research and self-discovery. The instructor will facilitate discussion, dialogue, and critique writing and presentation skills.

  
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    EXTR 2570 - Introduction to Seismic Interpretation (3CR)


    (2L, 2LB) Intended to provide an introduction to the interpretation of seismic reflection data. Seismic interpretation is currently the leading method for the exploration and development of oil and gas reserves. Students will learn to understand the seismic process, identify different structural styles from seismic data, interpret seismic sections in both two and three dimensions, relate subsurface stratigraphy to well data, develop a geologic model, create a basic stratigraphic framework using seismic stratigraphy, and prepare structure and other geological/geophysical maps. A basic knowledge of geology and physics is helpful.


Family and Consumer Science

  
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    FCSC 1100 - Introduction to Food Science (4CR)


    (3L, 3LB) This course will utilize food and food preparation as a model to examine basic scientific principles core to the life and physical sciences. Students will learn about food’s nutritive value and basic biologic, chemical and physical concepts in food science. Basic skills in food preparation and food processing will be introduced. Fundamental concepts in consumer science such as food choice and selection, unit pricing and meal planning are also explored.

  
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    FCSC 1141 - Principles of Nutrition (3CR)


    (3L) [E] This course is designed to give students a general understanding of nutrition concepts. The course content emphasizes key nutrients and the human body’s need for and utilization of those nutrients. Students will be informed of the importance of individualized nutrition plans, and will be exposed to some of the latest research in nutrition. Also addressed are nutritionally relevant topics such as eating disorders, nutritional supplements, dieting and food safety. Recommended for nutrition majors, physical education and early childhood education majors and other interested non-majors.

  
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    FCSC 1150 - Scientific Study of Food (3CR)


    (2L, 3LB) Comprehensive introduction to the study of food. Food science concepts relevant to composition, physical, chemical and biological properties are applied through laboratory experiences.

    Prerequisites: FCSC 1141 .
  
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    FCSC 2122 - Child Development Lab (1CR)


    (2LB) This course will serve as a bridge between theory and application through experience in the observation of child growth and development from birth to12 years of age.

    Prerequisites: PSYC 2300 , or concurrent enrollment.
  
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    FCSC 2141 - Nutrition Controversies (2CR)


    (2L) This course expands upon nutrition concepts covered in FCSC 1141 by exploring current nutrition-related controversies. Skills related to the interpretation of research literature will be emphasized.  Fall semesters

    Prerequisites: FCSC 1141  , or permission of the instructor

Finance

  
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    FIN 2100 - Managerial Finance (3CR)


    (3L) [E] Managerial finance deals with two main decisions that must be confronted by those managing the financial operations of corporations. First, there is the decision on which investment projects to undertake. Second, there is the decision on the best way to enhance projects. For the first task, the managers must forecast cash flows that might be generated by prospective projects and then select the appropriate discount rate with which to value such cash flows. The second task involves selecting the capital structure of the firm and includes for example, the choice between debt and equity.

    Prerequisites:  ACCT 2010    , STAT 2050 , or permission of the instructor.

Fire Technology

  
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    FIRE 1500 - Introduction to Fire Science (3CR)


    (3L) A broad overview of fire service covering historical and modern fire protection services including department organization, equipment, extinguishing agents, tactics, and detection systems.

  
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    FIRE 1510 - Fire Fighting Strategy and Tactics I (3CR)


    (3L) An introductory course that covers a range of management principles and practices to help students develop effective decision-making skills at the fire scene.

  
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    FIRE 1520 - Fire Fighting Strategy and Tactics II (3CR)


    (3L) An advanced course emphasizing skill development for effective decision making in fire and related emergency situations. Includes case studies and simulations.

    Prerequisites: FIRE 1510 , or fire service experience.
  
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    FIRE 1550 - Causes and Investigation (3CR)


    (3L) An in-depth study of the causes and investigation of fires of all types and descriptions from the fire science point of view.

  
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    FIRE 1670 - Basic Emergency Care/First Responder (3CR)


    (3L) Training in the fundamentals of emergency care. The course follows the state of Wyoming Office of Emergency Medical Services outline for basic emergency care. Excellent for students who are planning to enter the fire service or emergency medical services.

    Prerequisites: Fire science or criminal justice major, or permission of the instructor.
  
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    FIRE 1700 - Fundamentals of Fire Prevention (3CR)


    (3L) The history and philosophy of fire prevention and administrative functions. Evaluation of prevention programs and research provide insight into the fire problem in modern societies.

  
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    FIRE 1760 - Building Construction (3CR)


    (3L) A practical approach to assessing hazards in various types of buildings. Construction types and classes are examined with firefighter safety and occupant viability as the foremost considerations.

  
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    FIRE 1810 - Introduction to Wildland Fire Fighting (3CR)


    (3L) Designed to expose the student to all of the classroom material required to be qualified as a wild-land firefighter Type Two (Basic) including introductory fire behavior, methods, tactics and safety.

  
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    FIRE 1818 - Wildland Leadership (3CR)


    (3L) This course is designed to provide intermediate level instruction on wild-land fire fighting tactics, safety, and leadership.

  
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    FIRE 1830 - Intermediate Wildland Fire Behavior (3CR)


    (3L) Designed to expose the students to a more in-depth look at wild-land fire behavior. Incorporates the relations between fuels, weather, and topography. Also, a more in-depth look into firefighter safety is taken.

    Prerequisites: FIRE 1810 .
  
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    FIRE 1975 - Independent Study


    (1-3CR) An opportunity for students to develop projects in their particular area of interest within the fire science discipline. Course is self-paced with individualized instruction.

  
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    FIRE 2515 - Advanced Firefighting (3CR)


    (3L) This course prepares the student with the required skills needed in the fire service. This course assists students in developing an understanding of the physical and practical skills required to become a career firefighter.

    Prerequisites: Sophomore level in fire science program.
  
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    FIRE 2525 - Rescue Practices for the Fire Service (3CR)


    (3L) Designed to offer the student first-hand experience in the areas of high angle rescue, water rescue, and vehicle rescue/extrication.

  
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    FIRE 2530 - Hazardous Materials (3CR)


    (3L) This course involves the application of NFPA 472 and OSHA’s HAZWOPER Standard (29 CFR 1910.120) towards student involvement in hazardous materials emergency response. In order to pass this course each student must pass both state tests (Awareness and Operations). However, passing both state certified exams does not guarantee a passing grade in the class.

    Prerequisites: General understanding of emergency response.
  
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    FIRE 2560 - Apparatus and Procedures (3CR)


    (3L) Designed to acquaint the student with the evolution of fire apparatus and to provide an understanding of the uses for different pieces of fire-fighting vehicles.

  
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    FIRE 2570 - Managing Fire Service (3CR)


    (3L) Designed for the pre-service student as well as the fire officer in management or preparing for a managerial position. The course includes budget forecasting, facility and equipment planning, personnel activities, and fire protection productivity.

  
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    FIRE 2960 - Firefighter Development (3CR)


    (3L) To prepare the student for fire department entry-level testing through various exercises and community service projects.

  
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    FIRE 2970 - Fire Service Field Internship (3CR)


    (1L, 3LB) To prepare the student for fire department entry-level testing through various exercises and community service projects.


Food Science

  
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    FDSC 2040 - Principles of Meat Animal Evaluation (3CR)


    (2L, 2LB) [E] Live animal and carcass evaluation of beef, sheep, and swine. Slaughter, meat inspection and anatomy are discussed.

    Prerequisites: ANSC 1010  or instructor permission.
  
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    FDSC 2100 - Principles of Meat Science (3CR)


    (2L, 2LB) [E] Muscle growth, structure and metabolism, pre-harvest animal care, fabrication of carcasses into cuts and associated processing techniques; conversion of muscle into meat; fresh meat properties and quality; chemical properties of meat; meat processing; meat microbiology and safety.

    Prerequisites: CHEM 1000  or CHEM 1025  and FDSC 2040  or instructor permission.

French

  
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    FREN 0900 - French for Travelers (1CR)


    (1L) A course of simple French to help the traveler make plans, obtain tickets, order meals, ask for and understand general information as needed for travel in a French-speaking country.

 

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