Jun 20, 2024  
2020-2021 Academic Catalog and Student Handbook 
    
2020-2021 Academic Catalog and Student Handbook [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

French

  
  • FREN 1010 - First Year French I (4CR)


    (4L) [E] This course is intended for students who have never studied French at the college level. Students will learn the fundamentals of the French language through listening, speaking, reading, and writing activities at the ACTFL (American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages) Novice High Level. The course will also introduce students to the culture of various French-speaking countries. Language laboratory times are required as needed. Students who want to take for credit the next course in the sequence must complete this course with grade of a ‘C’ or better.

    Prerequisites: A grade of “C” or better in FREN 1010, CLEP test result, equivalent of 6-8 semesters of high school French with a cumulative “B” average or better in those classes, or instructor’s permission.
  
  • FREN 1020 - First Year French II (4CR)


    (4L) [E] This course is a continuation of the objectives in FREN 1010. Students will become more proficient in listening, speaking, reading, and writing French and will further their grammatical study of the French language at the ACTFL (American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages) Intermediate Low Level. The course will continue to introduce students to the culture of various French-speaking countries. Language laboratory times are required as needed.

    Prerequisites: A grade of “C” or better in FREN 1010 , CLEP test result, equivalent of 6-8 semesters of high school French with a cumulative “B” average or better in those classes, or instructor’s permission.
  
  • FREN 2030 - Second Year French I (4CR)


    (4L) [E] This course focuses on the increased development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in French. Students review and expand upon grammar points which facilitate successful communication at the ACTFL (American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages) Intermediate-Mid Level. Language laboratory times are required as needed.

    Prerequisites: A grade of “C” or better in FREN 1020 , CLEP test result, equivalent of 5-6 years of middle/junior high and high school French with a cumulative “B” average or better in those classes, or instructor’s permission.
  
  • FREN 2040 - Second Year French II (4CR)


    (4L) [E] This course further emphasizes the development of all four communicative aspects of the French language through composition, conversation, oral presentations, and grammar study. Language laboratory times are required as needed.

    Prerequisites: A grade of “C” or better in FREN 2030 , CLEP test result, or instructor’s permission.
  
  • FREN 2475 - Independent Study


    (1-4CR) (Max. 4) Students meet with the instructor to discuss independently assigned reading and reports from sources of special interest to the student(s) and pertaining to francophone culture and/or current events which are selected in consultation with the French instructor or record. All coursework will be done in French. Some oral/aural work will be required and grammatical topics may be revisited and expanded upon. Students much pass with a “C” or better.

    Prerequisites: FREN 2040  or permission of instructor.
  
  • FREN 2495 - Workshop: Topic


    (.5-4CR) (Max 12) This class provides a specialized course of study in French to meet particular interests of students and community members. Various topics focus on the development of practical French speaking skills and/or cultural awareness. This course may be repeated for a total of 12 credits under different topics. Student must pass with a “C” or better.

    Prerequisites: Permission of instructor

Geography and Recreation

  
  
  • GEOG 1000 - World Regional Geography (3CR)


    (3L) [E] An overview of the world’s major physical regions: the physical features, climates, and natural resources of each region, and how the people living in each region have adapted to, and are affected by, their physical environment.

  
  • GEOG 1010 - Introduction to Physical Geography (4CR)


    (3L, 2LB) [E] An introductory course that draws on many scientific fields to examine interactions between humans and their physical environment. Geology, meteorology, climatology, pedology, biology, and hydrology supply the background material, but the key word is interaction: how and why the weather affects our lives, food supply and soil formation, and where and how we can live within the limits imposed by the various environments of the earth. Because we live on the surface of the earth, the course will examine the major processes involved in shaping and landscape.

  
  • GEOG 1015 - Projects in GIS (1CR)


    (2LB) Students will participate and work alongside GEOG 2100  students assisting them with their GIS/GPS projects.

  
  • GEOG 1040 - Snow and Ice Field Class (4CR)


    (3L, 2LB) Of all of the environmental factors which shape the physical world in which we live, the snow and the ice (cryosphere) component is probably the least understood and appreciated by the layman and the scientist alike. At the same time, our existence is tremendously impacted in both positive and negative ways by these factors. Students will be required to attend field components including two local weekend excursions and a week-long field course in a location to be determined. Some field work may be physically strenuous; however, participation in these activities will be optional. Other approved exercises may be substituted if necessary.

    Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.
  
  • GEOG 1050 - Introduction to Environmental and Natural Resources (3CR)


    (3L) Addresses the impact from natural and human interactions with the environment. Will discuss regional to global scales on issues such as: hazardous earth processes, human interaction with the environment, cultural and ethnic responses to the environment, minerals and energy extraction and use, land use and decision-making. The class will view both sides of environmental issues and approaches to environmental management.

  
  • GEOG 1060 - Introduction to Remote Sensing and Drones (3CR)


    3L This course will give students an introduction in collecting and analyzing
    remote sensed data. The data will include remote sensed imagery taken from orbiting satellites, aerial flights, and drone data. Special attention will be given to flying Casper Colleges drones and learning how to collect their own remote sensed imagery and data, and applying the analysis of that data to real
    world projects. Fall Semesters

    Prerequisites: A working knowledge of a graphical computer user interface such as Windows or the MAC desktop.
  
  • GEOG 1080 - Introduction to GPS and Maps (3CR)


    (3L) An introductory course in the use of GPS technology, maps and pre-GIS applications. The class was designed to complement GEOL 2080 , General Field Geology, and for anyone interested in learning how to use a GPS hand-held unit in conjunction with all-topo digital mapping software and other map use.

  
  • GEOG 1100 - Introduction to GIS (4CR)


    (4L) An introductory course in geographic information systems (GIS) and an accompanying laboratory session. The course will discuss different types of GIS and their capabilities; GIS data collection and input; GIS data types and basic mapping concepts. The laboratory session will introduce students to ArcView 8 software.

  
  • GEOG 1110 - Management and Implementation of GIS (4CR)


    (4L) This course addresses strategies for successful GIS management and implementation in an organization-wide context and is organized around three primary issues: implementation planning, data management, and GIS problem solving in the workforce.

    Prerequisites: GEOG 1100 .
  
  • GEOG 2100 - Advanced GIS (4CR)


    (2L, 4LB) An advanced GIS course. The students will be split into teams and given a case study from an outside client and solve the case study using GIS. At the end of the semester, the teams will present the solution to the client in a presentation.

    Prerequisites: GEOG 1100  and GEOG 1110 , or concurrent enrollment in GEOG 1110 .
  
  • GEOG 2150 - Map Use and Analysis (3CR)


    (3L) Survey of the use of maps to communicate ideas and opinions about places, and the analysis and presentation of mapped data to solve spatial or geographic problems.

  
  • GEOG 2475 - Independent Study


    (1-3CR) An opportunity for students to develop projects in their particular area of interest within the GIS field.

    Prerequisites: Permission of instructor
  
  • GEOG 2480 - GIS Cooperative Work Experience


    (1-8CR) (Max. 8) Students are afforded the opportunity to gain practical on-the-job experience in their specialties. The program coordinator and the student’s employer will supervise the student. A minimum of 80 hours of on-the-job training represents one semester hour. Students must maintain 12 credit hours with at least a 2.0 GPA during the semester.

    Prerequisites: Enrollment in GIS certificate, degree, or minor program; permission of the program director.

Geology

  
  • GEOL 1010 - DEEP Impact (1-3cr)


    (1L) Students can repeat the course to earn up to 3 credits DEEP Impact is a mentoring course for geoscience students regardless of major who participate in the Diverse Earth Education Project (DEEP Impact).  The course is designed to assist students with their career and educational goals while students engage with undergraduate research projects.  Student should take the course multiple times to earn up to 3 credits total. This course will be offered every semester starting in the Spring of 2020.

    Prerequisites: None. 
    Concurrently: None
    Cross-listed: None
  
  • GEOL 1015 - Geology in the Field (2CR)


    (1L, 2LB) This course is designed to be lecture in the field about the spectacular geology of Wyoming. A great variety of Wyoming’s minerals, rocks, fossils, and scenic geology will be explored during field trips.

  
  • GEOL 1020 - Geology of Wyoming (1CR)


    (1L) Topics in the geology of Wyoming; lectures and field trips which illustrate a major facet of Wyoming’s natural geological laboratory. Topics have included volcanoes, glaciers, Wyoming gem stones and precious metals, plate tectonics, and the oil and gas business.

  
  • GEOL 1021 - Geology of Wyoming Field Trip (1CR)


    (2LB) Lecture in the field to observe first-hand the unique geological features of Wyoming.

    Concurrently: Optional field trip to be taken concurrently with GEOL 1020 .
  
  • GEOL 1040 - Gemstones and Their Geologic Origins (1CR)


    (1L) This course is designed to acquaint the student with gemstone identification, faceting and the geology which produces these rare specimens.

  
  • GEOL 1070 - Earth Science for Elementary Education Majors (4CR)


    (3L, 2LB) [E] Covers processes that resulted in the present topography and the past events and the fossil or evolutionary response to changing geography through time. Includes energy reserves, pollution, ecology, mineral resources, the earth framed as a planet, and the solar system.

  
  • GEOL 1100 - Physical Geology (4CR)


    (3L, 2LB) [E] A lecture and laboratory survey of the composition and geologic features of the earth and the processes which have formed them.

  
  • GEOL 1200 - Historical Geology (4CR)


    (3L, 2LB) [E] A lecture and laboratory survey of the physical and biological history of the earth as interpreted from the sequence of rocks and fossil remains. Field trips will be included in the spring semester.

    Prerequisites: GEOL 1100  recommended.
  
  • GEOL 1250 - Paleontology and Geology Field Work (1CR)


    Wyoming is one of the richest fossil regions in the world. This course offers the student an opportunity to look for and collect fossils from various field sites near Casper. These sites include fossils of early mammals as well as dinosaurs. All fossil specimens collected are the property of the Tate Geological Museum at Casper College. Exceptions for souvenir specimens can be made at the discretion of the Tate Museum staff.

  
  • GEOL 1500 - Water, Dirt, and Earth’s Environment (4CR)


    (3L, 3LB) Introductory environmental geology course focusing on water and soil both as hazards and as life-sustaining resources; exploring surface processes and climate change over geological and human timescales. Case studies illustrate the environmental tradeoffs of resource use.

    Cross-listed: (Cross-listed with ENR 1500 )
  
  • GEOL 2000 - Geochemical Cycles and the Earth System (4CR)


    (3L, 2LB) Geology applied to the complete Earth system including Lithosphere, Hydrosphere, Atmosphere and Biosphere, emphasizing rock associations and geochemical cycles on a global scale.

    Prerequisites: GEOL 1100 .
  
  • GEOL 2005 - Introduction to Geophysics (4CR)


    (3L, 2LB) Introduction to the processes and properties of the physical earth. Topics to be covered include: gravity and magnetics, heat flow, seismo-tectonics, earthquakes, global earth structure, electro-magnetism, and seismology.

    Prerequisites: GEOL 2000 - Geochemical Cycles and the Earth System (4CR) 

    GEOL 1100 or GEOL/ENR 1500 or permission from instructor

  
  • GEOL 2010 - Mineralogy (3CR)


    (2L, 3LB) [E] An in-depth introduction to the mineralogy of rock-forming minerals and minerals of economic interest. Lectures and labs will cover the chemical, physical and optical properties of minerals. The class will systematically cover minerals and mineral associations. Great emphasis will be placed on hand sample and microscopic identification of rockforming minerals. Generally offered in the spring semester.

    Prerequisites: GEOL 1100 Physical Geology or permission from instructor. 
    Concurrently: Concurrent enrollment in GEOL 2020 Introduction to Petrology is required.
  
  • GEOL 2020 - Introduction to Petrology (2CR)


    (1L, 2LB) Introduces the study of igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks in hand specimens and thin sections. Covers textural and mineralogic classification of rocks and the tectonic environments in which they occur.

    Prerequisites: GEOL 1100  or instructor permission.
    Concurrently: Concurrent enrollment in GEOL 2010 is required
  
  • GEOL 2030 - Introduction to Hydrology (3CR)


    (2L, 2LB) Introduction to Hydrology covers the physical and chemical properties of water on Earth, processes of flow at the surface and in the subsurface, as well as fresh water as a finite global resource.

    Prerequisites: GEOL 1100  recommended, or permission of the instructor.
  
  • GEOL 2050 - Principles of Paleontology (3CR)


    (3L) [E] A systematic look at the evolution of life forms on Earth from the earliest traces of organic material in Archaen rocks billions of years ago to the great diversity of life we see today.

  
  • GEOL 2070 - Oceanography (4CR)


    (3L, 2LB) Deals with the ocean as a major environment of the earth. Includes the physical make-up of the ocean and the ocean as a climate controller and a resource for humans. Future pollution factors will also be discussed.

  
  • GEOL 2080 - General Field Geology (4CR)


    (3L, 2LB) [E] General Field Geology teaches students basic concepts of geology, field mapping, and sampling technique. Emphasizes recognition, recording, and interpretation of geologic and paleontologic features in the field.

    Prerequisites: GEOL 1100  and at least two other geology classes.
  
  • GEOL 2100 - Stratigraphy and Sedimentation (4CR)


    (3L, 3LB) [E] A basic course in stratigraphy and sedimentation which stresses depositional, environmental, and age relationships of sedimentary rock.

    Prerequisites: GEOL 1100 , or permission of the instructor.
  
  • GEOL 2150 - Geomorphology (4CR)


    (3L, 2LB) [E] The formation, description and study of land forms which are a result of destructional and constructional geologic processes. The study of topographic maps and aerial photographs are an integral part of the course.

    Prerequisites: GEOL 1100  recommended, or permission of the instructor.
  
  • GEOL 2320 - Petroleum Geology (3CR)


    (3L) The origin and properties of petroleum reservoirs with methods of exploring for structural and stratigraphic traps by subsurface and surface geologic techniques. Mode of petroleum genesis, preferential, habitat and migration, and accumulation will be discussed in depth.

    Prerequisites: GEOL 1100  or EXTR 1500 , or permission of the instructor.
  
  • GEOL 2465 - Research Problems in Geology


    (1-3CR) (Max. 3) A comprehensive research study in geology is required, the topic must be selected in consultation with the instructor. Upon completing the project, the student will present a written and an oral report to the instructor.


Gender

  
  • GNDR 1000 - Introduction to Gender Studies (3CR)


    (3L) This course is an introduction to the study of gender as a category for social and cultural analysis. We will study the intersections of gender, class, race/ethnicity, nationality, age and sexuality and will examine how those intersections shape our experiences, our culture, and the social institutions we inhabit. This course is a survey of gender construction and will use critical theory to examine gender within the areas of social institutions, literature, history, visual art, film, biological theories, psychology, and popular culture.

  
  • GNDR 2000 - Gender Studies Service Learning


    (.5-1L, 1-4LB) (1-3CR) This course will provide students with the opportunity to apply their theoretical understanding of gender studies to practical and concrete situations in their community settings. Students will work in a variety of agencies including educational, political, and/or social service agencies; students will choose their site according to their interests and according to faculty recommendations. In addition to the on-site experience, students will meet regularly with the faculty and their classmates to share and analyze their service-learning experience and to engage in critical reflection about gender theory.

    Prerequisites: WMST 1080 , GNDR 1000 , PSYC 2060  or permission of the instructor.

German

  
  • GERM 0900 - German for Travelers (1CR)


    (1L) A course of simple German to help the traveler make plans, obtain tickets, order meals, and ask for and understand general information as needed for travel in a German-speaking country.

  
  • GERM 1010 - First Year German I (4CR)


    (4L) [E] This course is intended for students who have never studied German at the college level. Students will learn the fundamentals of the German language through listening, speaking, reading and writing activities of the ACTFL (American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages) Novice-High Level. This course will also introduce student to the culture of various German-speaking countries. Language laboratory times are required as needed. Students who want to take for credit the next course in the sequence must complete this course with grade of a ‘C’ or better.

    Prerequisites: None; however, the course is strongly recommended for students who have completed the equivalent of 0-5 semesters of high school German.
  
  • GERM 1020 - First Year German II (4CR)


    (4L) [E] This course is a continuation of the objectives in GERM 1010. Students will become more proficient in listening, speaking, reading, and writing German and will further their grammatical study of the German language at the ACTFL (American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages) Intermediate-Low Level. The course will continue to introduce students to the culture of various German-speaking countries. Language laboratory times are required as needed.

    Prerequisites: A grade of “C” or better in GERM 1010 , CLEP test result, equivalent of 6-8 semesters of high school German with a cumulative “B” average or better in those classes, or instructor’s permission.
  
  • GERM 2030 - Second Year German I (4CR)


    (4L) [E] This course focuses on increased development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in German. Students review and expand upon grammar points which facilitate successful communication at the ACTFL (American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages) Intermediate-Mid Level. Language laboratory times are required as needed.

    Prerequisites: A grade of “C” or better in GERM 1020 , CLEP test result, equivalent of 5-6 years of middle/junior high and high school German with a cumulative “B” average or better in those classes, or instructor’s permission.
  
  • GERM 2040 - Second Year German II (4CR)


    (4L) [E] This course further emphasizes the development of all four communicative aspects of the German language through composition, conversation, oral presentations, and grammar study. Language laboratory times are required as needed.

    Prerequisites: A grade of “C” or better in GERM 2030 , CLEP test result, or instructor’s permission.
  
  • GERM 2420 - Aktives Deutsch: Travel (2CR)


    (2L) This travel course will focus on the unique culture found in the German-speaking countries. It will help students to more fully appreciate that culture while living in the midst of it as they attend full-immersion German language lessons. Students will be guided to negotiate the processes of ordering and paying for food, using public transportation, shopping and making purchases, and converting currency in real-life, hands-on situations. Also included are instructor-led tours and history lessons, which are given mostly in German. In response to the interests of students, various topics will focus on specific cultural aspects/sites and on cultural awareness. This course is required for all students participating in short-term study abroad trips to Germany sponsored by Casper College.

    Prerequisites: Successful completion of GERM 1010  with a grade of C or better, or instructor’s permission (based upon demonstration of equivalent German language skills). Students must be 18 years old by the trip’s departure date.
  
  • GERM 2475 - Independent Study, German


    (1-4CR) (Max. 4) Students who want to take for credit the next course in the sequence must complete this course with a grade of “C” or better.

    Prerequisites: GERM 2030 , or permission of the instructor.
  
  • GERM 2495 - Workshop: (Subtitle)


    (.5-3CR) (Max. 12) Offered in response to needs and interests of students and members of the community. Various topics will focus on development of practical German speaking skills and on cultural awareness. A student may repeat this course under different subtitles for a maximum of 12 credit hours. Students who want to take for credit the next course in the sequence must complete this course with a grade of “C” or better.


Health Technology

  
  • HLTK 1000 - Principles of Healthcare Calculations (2CR)


    (2L) A review of basic arithmetic, an introduction to the metric and apothecary systems, and computation of medication dosages.

  
  • HLTK 1200 - Medical Terminology (3CR)


    (3L) An introduction to medical vocabulary and terminology. The use of abbreviations, suffixes, and combining forms are stressed to give the student a working knowledge of medical terms.

  
  • HLTK 1300 - Nursing Boot Camp (1CR)


    (1L) Provides students with academic skills and strategies for successful transition into the Casper College Nursing Program. Topics include resources available at Casper College, strategies for studying and test-taking, review of teaching-learning modalities used in the nursing program, introduction to the Nursing Student handbook, review of the application process, and development of an action plan to support success. Course has online, campus and group activities.

    Prerequisites: HMDV 1300  or concurrent enrollment.
  
  • HLTK 1500 - Introduction to Health Care and Services (2CR)


    (2L) Concepts of health care organization, finance, and delivery in the United States. Explores interrelationships among agencies, organizations, and personnel in the delivery of health care. (Fall semester.)

  
  • HLTK 1620 - American Heart Association Heart Saver First Aid, CPR and AED (.33CR)


    (.33LB) Provides training in adult, child and infant cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), foreign body airway obstruction, and the use of an automated external defibrillator (AED). Also provides training for laypeople in first aid assessments and actions. S/U grading only.

  
  • HLTK 1625 - American Heart Association BLS for the Provider (.33CR)


    (.13L, .2LB) Designed to introduce the student to the cardiopulmonary resuscitation techniques needed by providers for adult, child and infant including use of the automatic external defibrillator (AED). S/U grading only.

  
  • HLTK 1660 - Advanced Cardiac Life Support (.66CR)


    (.26L, .66LB) This course is designed to introduce the Allied Health Professional to the concepts and techniques of Advanced Cardiac Life Support and includes both lecture and hands on practical application of knowledge and skills necessary to provide Advanced Cardiac Life Support to a patient in need. S/U grading only.

    Prerequisites: This course is designed for Allied Health students in their final semester of discipline-specific instruction. Participants must have a current AHA BLS for HCP Provider certification. Students are also required to complete a precourse self-assessment prior to the beginning of class. Those not completing the assessment will not be allowed into the class.
  
  • HLTK 1675 - AHA Pediatric Advanced Life Support (.66CR)


    (.66LB) This course is designed to introduce the Allied Health Professional to the concepts and techniques of Pediatric Advanced Life Support and includes both lecture and hands on practical application of knowledge and skills necessary to provide Pediatric Advanced life Support to a patient in need. S/U grading only.

    Prerequisites: This course is designed for Allied Health students in their final semester of discipline-specific instruction. Participants much have a current AHA BLS for HCP Provider certification. Students are also required to complete a precourse self-assessment prior to the beginning of class. Those not completing the assessment will not be allowed into the class.
  
  • HLTK 1855 - Assistive Technology Practicum (3CR)


    (6LB) This course is designed to provide hands-on experience with various areas of assistive technology. Students will participate in general assistive technology (AT) evaluation concepts, exploration of different types of assistive technology equipment and application of AT to various populations.

    Prerequisites: HLTK 1625  or equivalent CPR certification.
  
  • HLTK 1860 - Introduction to Human Disease (3CR)


    (3L) This course is designed to provide a general overview of common diagnoses and conditions addressed in healthcare settings. Emphasis will be on considerations of symptoms, ethical and safety considerations as well as organizational and healthcare collaboration.

  
  • HLTK 1865 - Equine Assisted Therapy Practicum (3CR)


    (6LB) This course is designed to provide hands-on experience with various aspects of equine assisted therapy. Students will participate in activities to incorporate concepts of general equine care and handling, utilizing riding and equine management from a therapeutic perspective and addressing mental health and physical disability through equine assisted therapy.

    Prerequisites: HLTK 1625  or equivalent CPR certification.
  
  • HLTK 1870 - Professionalism in Healthcare (3CR)


    (3L) This course is designed to introduce students to the concepts of professional interactions by facilitating a positive work environment. Emphasis is placed on learning aspects of effective communication, application of the team process, awareness and management of ethical dilemmas, utilizing professional boundaries, rapport building and crisis management.

  
  • HLTK 1875 - Gerontology Practicum (3CR)


    (6LB) This course is designed to provide a general overview of the effects of aging, and the common diagnoses and conditions seen in geriatric clients. The course practicum will focus on educating the students about the importance of health, wellness, and safety of the geriatric population. Students will participate with community partners to immerse themselves in the needs of an aging population.

    Prerequisites: HLTK 1625  or equivalent CPR certification.
  
  • HLTK 1975 - Spanish for Health Care Workers (3CR)


    (3L) A course designed for health care workers or students in the health care industry who have little or no background in Spanish. The course presents the student with health care terminology, basic grammar and aspects of Hispanic culture. There is an emphasis on the basic language skills of conversation and comprehension to prepare individuals to work with Spanish-speaking clients in a variety of health care settings.

  
  • HLTK 2400 - Complementary and Alternative Therapies (CAT) and Nursing (3CR)


    (3L) This elective course introduces the nurse or nursing student to the ever-expanding areas that are Complementary and Alternative Therapies (CAT) or Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM). The impact of these therapeutic modalities is explored as well as the implications for nursing practice. This course is informative only. You will not learn to be a practitioner of any of these modalities; you will be learning only about said therapies. This course will encompass many therapeutic modalities: music therapy, aroma therapy, massage therapy, acupuncture, acupressure, herbal remedies, and reflexology. Other information covered will include Reiki, therapeutic touch, and guided imagery. Additional topics will be covered as well.

  
  • HLTK 2550 - Understanding the Economics, Ethics, and Policies Influencing Health Care (3CR)


    (3L) Legal, ethical, economical, and political issues related to health policy that impact the care of patients by health care providers. Rural and urban health care issues will be emphasized. Utilization of professional associations will be included.

  
  • HLTK 2560 - The Interprofessional Health Care Team (3CR)


    (3L) This course covers leadership and development concepts that apply to the interprofessional health care team. Concepts covered will include team and group development, relationship-centered leadership, and building and sustaining collaborative interprofessional teams. Application of concepts will include: health care informatics, evidence based practices, interprofessional simulation activities, and behaviors that foster a collaborative culture.


History

  
  • HIST 1110 - Western Civilization I (3CR)


    (3L) [E] A general survey of the significant political, social, economic, cultural, and intellectual concepts and institutions of the West, from the Paleolithic origins of humans through the Reformation.

  
  • HIST 1120 - Western Civilization II (3CR)


    (3L) [E] A general survey of the modern world, from the Reformation to the present. Emphasis is equally divided between national histories and the development of Europe as a whole, including the impact of the West on the entire world.

  
  • HIST 1211 - United States to 1865 (3CR)


    (3L) [E] A survey of the economic, social and political development of the United States from earliest exploration through the Civil War, with some emphasis on the American Constitution and its development as well as the Wyoming Constitution. This course will satisfy the statutory requirement of the U. S. and Wyoming Constitutions for Casper College and the University of Wyoming.

  
  • HIST 1221 - United States from 1865 (3CR)


    (3L) [E] A survey of the economic, social, and political development of the United States from reconstruction to the present. This course will satisfy the statutory requirement of the U.S. and Wyoming Constitution.

  
  • HIST 1251 - Wyoming History (3CR)


    (3L) [E] A survey course which examines aspects of Wyoming’s frontier history. This course will also satisfy the statutory requirement of the U.S. and Wyoming Constitution.

  
  • HIST 2080 - Holocaust (3CR)


    (3L) [E] This course will explore the foundations of the Third Reich beginning immediately after World War I and ending in May 1945. Among the issues that will be discussed are the economic, military and social factors that led to the rise of National Socialism, Adolf Hitler and the other members of the NSDAP hierarchy that influenced the development of political and social doctrine in Germany, the legal maneuvering that legitimized genocide, the role of the SS including concentration camp administration and mobile killing operations in the East. The process of deportation, ghettoization and liquidation of the Jews of Europe in the death camps will be a central area of emphasis.

  
  • HIST 2115 - Twentieth Century Europe (3CR)


    (3L) History 2115 analyzes European history from 1900-1991. Special attention will be paid to the Great War, Russian Revolution, World War II and the Cold War.

  
  • HIST 2240 - History of Russia Since 1855 (3CR)


    (3L) General survey of modern Russian history from 1855 to present.

  
  • HIST 2300 - World War II (3CR)


    (3L) The Second World War is, arguably, the most significant military, political and social event of the Twentieth Century. The millions of military and civilian deaths, the destruction of infrastructure and the postwar Allied military governments in Germany and Japan all affected the way that the world was shaped. In this class we will examine the Second World War including the political and social upheaval in Europe following World War One that made possible the rise of National Socialism in Germany and Bolshevism in Russia. The expansionist goals of Imperial Japan and the resulting Pacific war will also be discussed as will the Holocaust and the Nazis’ war against the Jews of Europe.

  
  • HIST 2450 - History of Ireland (3CR)


    (3L) This course surveys the history of Ireland beginning with the Celtic invasion of the island to 21st century efforts to establish a lasting peace in the North. Major topics include the impact of invasions (Celtic, Viking, and especially English) early modern, and modern Irish History.

  
  • HIST 2475 - Independent Study


    (1-3CR) An opportunity for students to develop projects in their particular area of interest within the history discipline.


Hospitality

  
  • HOSP 1520 - Introduction to Hospitality and Tourism Management (3CR)


    (3L) Overview of the components of the hospitality and tourism industry from a historical, social, philosophical, and organizational perspective. Includes the study of the industry from regional, state, national and international perspectives for those who want to pursue a career in the industry and for those who want to develop their job skills.

  
  • HOSP 1540 - Hotel Operations Management (3CR)


    (3L) Examines the basic management functions of planning, budgeting, controlling, staffing, and operating a hotel property. Includes topics such as front office operations, night audit and financial procedures, hospitality management information systems, and legal and human resources practices.

  
  • HOSP 1560 - Convention Sales and Management (3CR)


    (3L) Defines the scope and various segments of the convention market, explains what is required to meet individual needs, and explores methods and techniques which lead to better sales and service.

  
  • HOSP 1570 - Human Resource Hospitality Management (3CR)


    (3L) This course presents a systematic approach to human resource management in the hospitality industry. Students will analyze contemporary issues and practices, as well as the trends that transform the way people are managed.

  
  • HOSP 2320 - Food and Beverage Management (3CR)


    (3L) Provides a basic understanding of food production and service management, reviewing sanitation, menu planning, purchasing, storage, and beverage management.

  
  • HOSP 2330 - Food and Beverage Services (3CR)


    (3L) Provides students with practical skills and knowledge for effective management of food and beverage services in outlets ranging from cafeteria and coffee shops to room service, banquet areas, and high check average dining room. Presents basic service principles while emphasizing the special needs of guests.

  
  • HOSP 2520 - Marketing of Hospitality Services (3CR)


    (3L) This course teaches how to use proven marketing techniques to improve business, and how to discover, identify and reach the desired customer by using marketing tactics specific to hospitality services.

  
  • HOSP 2525 - Recreation and Tourism Planning and Development (3CR)


    (3L) Investigates the policy, planning, development, and management practices related to recreation; outdoor conservation practices; state and national park regulations; and other tourism opportunities.

  
  • HOSP 2530 - Tourism Management (3CR)


    (3L) Explores major concepts in tourism and how tourism is an important factor in economic development on the local, state. regional, national and global stages. Provides an overview of the principles, practices, and philosophies that affect the cultural, social, economic, psychological, and marketing aspects of human travel and the tourism industry. 

  
  • HOSP 2535 - Planning and Control for Food and Beverage Operations (3CR)


    (3L) Students will be exposed to the most up-to-date control processes used to reduce costs in food and beverage operations worldwide. The course provides an increased focus on multi-unit-management and technology applications and exposing students to cutting-edge resources.

  
  • HOSP 2540 - Bar and Beverage Management (3CR)


    (3L) This course provides an introduction to bar and beverage management; planning, equipping, staffing, operating, and marketing a facility; how beverages are made, purchased, controlled, and mixed into different kinds of drinks.

  
  • HOSP 2600 - Leadership and Management in the Hospitality Industry (3CR)


    (3L) This course explores quality and leadership issues in today’s hospitality industry. Topics include power and empowerment; communication; goal setting; high-performance teams; diversity; managing organizational change; and strategic career planning. Students will learn why traditional management theories don’t fit today’s industry, and how a company’s service strategy relates to guest perception of value.

  
  • HOSP 2620 - Training and Development for the Hospitality Industry (3CR)


    (3L) Training is the key to keeping pace with the hospitality industry’s changing demands for a qualified workforce. Learn how to develop, conduct, and evaluate one-on-one and group training that will reduce turnover, improve job performance, and help any organization attain its goals. Students will discover why training is an important investment for their property, how to train various levels of employees and how to implement effective instructional design techniques and processes.

  
  • HOSP 2980 - Cooperative Work Experience (Hospitality Management)


    (1-3CR) (Max. 9) Students are afforded the opportunity to gain practical on-the-job experience in their area of hospitality management. Students will be supervised by the program coordinator and the employer. A minimum of 80 hours of on-the-job training represents one credit hour. Student must maintain 12 credit hours with a 2.0 GPA during the semester.

    Prerequisites: full-time hospitality management major and permission of program coordinator.

Human Development

  
  • HMDV 1025 - Introduction to Online Learning (1CR)


    (1L) This fully online course is designed to teach students how to use and navigate through the Moodle4Me course management system, learn the basics of internet use, email communication, file management, college resources, and library use. Students will use various tutorial materials and corresponding hands-on activities to complete requirements.

  
  • HMDV 1101 - First-Year Seminar (3CR)


    (3L) A first-year seminar focused on critical thinking and college success strategies. As individuals, and in groups, students examine the personal, social, civic, and economic goals of a college education, with emphasis on cognitive, moral, aesthetic, and identity development. During the class, students do research, they think through complex issues, consult with others, and in the end, present samples of their work to the instructor and classmates,. Each semester, multiple sections

  
  • HMDV 1200 - Academic and Career Orientation (2CR)


    (2L) This course consists of three primary components: self-assessment, including assessment of the student’s interests, aptitudes, and values; job search skills, including learning how and where to look for employment, devising cover letters and a resume, proper completion of employment applications, interview skills, and follow-up techniques; and a series of guest speakers who lecture and answer questions concerning a variety of careers, thereby expanding the student’s knowledge about occupations.

  
  • HMDV 1300 - On Course (2CR)


    (2L) Provides students with academic and personal strategies for a successful transition to the college. Topics include study skill techniques such as reading, note taking, test taking and organizing and rehearsing study materials. Other topics touched on include accepting responsibility, motivation, self-management, interdependence, and self-awareness. This course will also introduce students to campus resources.


Humanities

  
  
  • HUMN 2020 - Introduction to American Culture (3CR)


    (3L) This course is designed as an overview of American culture. All students will develop a framework for a better understanding of some specific aspects of American life, such as family, education, religion, politics and business. This course will be particularly beneficial for students who have a limited knowledge of the values, perspectives, institutions, and traditions which bind Americans together.

 

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