May 23, 2024  
2020-2021 Academic Catalog and Student Handbook 
    
2020-2021 Academic Catalog and Student Handbook [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Physical Education Activities

  
  • PEAC 1470 - Modern Dance II (1CR)


    (3LB) This course will be an introduction to the principles and techniques of Modern Dance. Dancers will focus on technique, terminology, and the execution of the basic steps, as well as the discovery of movement in space and time.

  
  • PEAC 1680 - Extreme Fitness (1CR)


    (2LB) This course is designed to give students an understanding of the importance of physical fitness, cardiovascular conditioning, muscular strength, muscular endurance and flexibility.

  
  • PEAC 1681 - Extreme Fitness II (1CR)


    (2LB) This course is designed to give students an understanding of the importance of physical fitness, cardiovascular conditioning, muscular strength, muscular endurance and flexibility, and its relevance to the fire service. We will focus on developing strength through weight training Spring Only

  
  • PEAC 2001 - Physical Fitness and Wellness I (1CR)


    (2LB) [E] This physical education activity course is open to all students. It is designed as an open laboratory to accommodate each student’s needs. Emphasis is placed in three areas of physical fitness: strength, flexibility, and cardiovascular endurance. Pin select weight machines will be used in circuit training concept to develop more effectively one’s level of physical fitness. Free weights are also available. Orientation for the class is required.

  
  • PEAC 2002 - Physical Fitness and Wellness II (1CR)


    (2LB) This physical education activity course is open to all students. It is designed as an open laboratory to accommodate each student’s needs. Emphasis is placed in three areas of physical fitness: strength, flexibility, and cardiovascular endurance. Pin select weight machines will be used in circuit training concept to develop more effectively one’s level of physical fitness. Free weights are also available. Orientation for the class is required.

  
  • PEAC 2003 - Physical Fitness and Wellness III (1CR)


    (2LB) This physical education activity course is open to all students. It is designed as an open laboratory to accommodate each student’s needs. Emphasis is placed in three areas of physical fitness: strength, flexibility, and cardiovascular endurance. Pin select weight machines will be used in circuit training concept to develop more effectively one’s level of physical fitness. Free weights are also available. Orientation for the class is required.

  
  • PEAC 2004 - Physical Fitness and Wellness IV (1CR)


    (2LB) This physical education activity course is open to all students. It is designed as an open laboratory to accommodate each student’s needs. Emphasis is placed in three areas of physical fitness: strength, flexibility, and cardiovascular endurance. Pin select weight machines will be used in circuit training concept to develop more effectively one’s level of physical fitness. Free weights are also available. Orientation for the class is required.

  
  • PEAC 2005 - Personal Fitness


    Audit only course. Designed as open laboratory to accommodate each student’s needs. Emphasis on strength, flexibility, and cardiovascular endurance. Universal equipment used in circuit training concept. Free weights also available.

  
  • PEAC 2007 - Express Fitness (1CR)


    (2LB) This physical education activity course is designed as an open laboratory to allow each student the benefit of setting his or her own schedule. Emphasis is placed in four areas of physical fitness: muscle strength, muscle endurance, flexibility, and cardiovascular endurance. The Fitness Center contains aerobic equipment, a universal circuit, and free weights to develop more effectively one’s level of physical fitness. The student is responsible for meeting the minimum exercise standards in order to receive credit. All students must complete an orientation and initial meeting prior to starting their program.

  
  • PEAC 2013 - Scuba Certification (1CR)


    (2LB) Safe diving procedures, proper use of scuba equipment, and dive tables. The course is presented in three segments: lectures, pool, and open water dives. Upon satisfactory completion of the course, the student will be certified in accordance with the Professional Association of Diving Instructors (PADI) for open water dives.

    Prerequisites: instructor permission only.
  
  • PEAC 2044 - Tae Kwon Do III (1CR)


    (2LB) An intermediate course in the art of Tae Kwon Do. Teaches the mental training and techniques of unarmed combat for self-defense.

    Prerequisites: PEAC 1279 .
  
  • PEAC 2050 - Intermediate Tennis (1CR)


    (2LB) Continuation of the basic skills and techniques of tennis. Students will learn strategies of singles and doubles play. Beginning tennis not a requirement if the student has prior tennis experience.

  
  • PEAC 2053 - Intermediate Bowling (1CR)


    (2LB) Online course for the intermediate to advanced bowler who does not need hands on instruction for practice. Material covered will include terminology, bowling history, bowling strategies, and game variations. Students will also be required to participate in bowling activities which must be signed off by a staff member at their chosen location. Any fees associated with participation will be paid by the student. It is highly recommended that students have bowling experience before taking this course.

  
  • PEAC 2054 - Tae Kwon Do IV (1CR)


    (2LB) An intermediate course in the art of Tae Kwon Do. Teaches the mental training and techniques of unarmed combat for self-defense.

    Prerequisites: PEAC 2044 .
  
  • PEAC 2055 - Intermediate Golf (1CR)


    (2LB) Online course for the intermediate to advanced golfer who does not need hands on instruction for practice. Material covered will include terminology, golf history, and basic to advanced rules and strategies of the game. Students will also be required to participate in golf activities which must be signed off by a staff member at their chosen location. Any fees associated with participation will be paid by the student. It is highly recommended that students have golf experience before taking this course.

  
  • PEAC 2084 - Outdoor Living Skills (1CR)


    (2LB) An introductory course conducted in a back-country setting. Fitness Center orientation, a physical conditioning program, and classroom sessions are required prior to the trip.


Physical Education Varsity Sports

  
  
  
  
  
  • PEAT 1010 - Cheerleading (1CR)


    (2LB) Current enrollment limited to cheerleaders. Selection is to be made at fall semester.

    Prerequisites: permission of instructor.
  
  • PEAT 1075 - Varsity Basketball I (1CR)


    (2LB) (Max. 4) [E] Team competition with regular practice sessions.

    Prerequisites: permission of instructor.
  
  • PEAT 1076 - Varsity Basketball II (1CR)


    (2LB) (Max. 4) [E] Team competition with regular practice sessions.

    Prerequisites: permission of instructor.
  
  • PEAT 1077 - Varsity Soccer (1CR)


    (2LB) Team competition with regular practice sessions. Prerequisites: permission of instructor.  Every Fall semester

    Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor
  
  • PEAT 1078 - Varsity Soccer II (1CR)


    (2LB) Team competition with regular practice sessions. Prerequisites: permission of instructor.  Every Spring semester

    Prerequisites: Instructor Permission
  
  • PEAT 1080 - Varsity Volleyball I (1CR)


    (2LB) (Max. 4) [E] Team competition with regular practice sessions.

    Prerequisites: permission of instructor.
  
  • PEAT 1085 - Varsity Volleyball II (1CR)


    (2LB) (Max. 4) [E] Team competition with regular practice sessions.

    Prerequisites: permission of instructor.
  
  • PEAT 2025 - Rodeo (1CR)


    (2LB) (Max. 4) Designed to prepare rodeo athletes for competition in the nine different rodeo events. Emphasis is put on improving and developing the techniques needed to perform in the rodeo arena along with instruction in the interpretation of the rules regulating all rodeo events.

    Prerequisites: must become an active NIRA member and participate in all CRMR rodeos or have instructor’s approval.
  
  • PEAT 2075 - Varsity Basketball III (1CR)


    (2LB) (Max. 4) [E] Team competition with regular practice sessions.

    Prerequisites: permission of instructor.
  
  • PEAT 2076 - Varsity Basketball IV (1CR)


    (2LB) (Max. 4) [E] Team competition with regular practice sessions.

    Prerequisites: permission of instructor.
  
  • PEAT 2077 - Varsity Soccer III (1CR)


    (2LB) Team competition with regular practice sessions. Prerequisites: permission of instructor.  Every Fall

    Prerequisites: Instructor Permission
  
  • PEAT 2078 - Varsity Soccer IV (1CR)


    (2LB) Team competition with regular practice sessions. Prerequisites: permission of instructor.  Every Spring

    Prerequisites: Instructor Permission
  
  • PEAT 2080 - Varsity Volleyball III (1CR)


    (2LB) (Max. 4) [E] Team competition with regular practice sessions.

    Prerequisites: permission of instructor.
  
  • PEAT 2085 - Varsity Volleyball IV (1CR)


    (2LB) (Max. 4) [E] Team competition with regular practice sessions.

    Prerequisites: permission of instructor.

Physics

  
  
  
  • PHYS 1050 - Concepts of Physics (4CR)


    (3L, 3LB) [E] One semester course for those students whose curricula call for an introduction to elementary physical concepts.

    Prerequisites: MATH 0900 .
  
  • PHYS 1090 - The Fundamentals of the Physical Universe (4CR)


    (3L, 2LB) [E] One semester introduction to the physical sciences (physics and chemistry) designed only for students majoring in elementary education. (Does not qualify as a lab science for non-elementary education majors.)

  
  • PHYS 1110 - General Physics I (4CR)


    (3L, 3LB) [E] First course of two-semester sequence. Introduces elementary college physics without calculus. Primarily for pre-medical, pre-dental, pre-optometry, pre-physical therapy, vocational, technical, and other students requiring insight into workings of the physical world. Includes classical mechanics, gravitation and heat. Required laboratory sessions will illustrate principles studied.

    Prerequisites: MATH 1400 
  
  • PHYS 1120 - General Physics II (4CR)


    (3L, 3LB) [E] Follows PHYS 1110 and completes introduction to physics without calculus. Includes electricity, magnetism, optics and modern physics. Required laboratory sessions illustrate principles studied.

    Prerequisites: PHYS 1110  
  
  • PHYS 1310 - College Physics I (4CR)


    (4L, 2LB) [E] First semester course in physics designed for those majoring in physics, engineering, mathematics, or physical sciences. Topics covered are mechanics and heat.

    Prerequisites: MATH 2200 .
  
  • PHYS 1320 - College Physics II (4CR)


    (4L, 2LB) [E] Follows PHYS 1310 and continues introduction to physics with calculus. Includes electricity, magnetism and thermodynamics. Laboratory sessions illustrate principles studied and meaning of physical measurement.

    Prerequisites: MATH 2205 
  
  • PHYS 2310 - Physics III: Waves and Optics (4CR)


    (4L, 2LB) [E] Third-semester course primarily for majors in physics, astronomy, engineering, mathematics, and other sciences. Includes Gaussian Optics and matrix calculations, wave equations, interference, superposition principle, elementary Fourier Analysis, Fraunhofer and Fresnel Diffraction, application to optical instruments.

    Prerequisites: PHYS 1320  concurrently and MATH 2205 .
  
  • PHYS 2320 - Physics IV: Modern Physics (4CR)


    (4L, 2LB) Fourth semester course primarily for majors in physics, astronomy, engineering, mathematics, and other physical sciences. Topics include introductory quantum mechanics, nuclear and particle physics, lasers, Planck’s Blackbody Radiation, photoelectric effect, electron diffraction, wave-particle duality, deBroglie Wavelength, Bohr Atom, Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle, Schrodinger Equation, and Einstein’s Special Theory of Relativity.

    Prerequisites: PHYS 1320  concurrently and MATH 2205 .

Political Science

  
  • POLS 1000 - American and Wyoming Government (3CR)


    (3L) [E] The organization and nature of the American national government and Wyoming state government and their constitutional development. This course meets the statutory requirement for instruction in the constitutions of the United States and Wyoming.

  
  • POLS 1020 - Issues in Foreign Relations I (3CR)


    (3L) (BOCES class.) This year-long course entails an introduction to the concepts, institutions, and issues of contemporary foreign relations from the perspective of the United States. The focal point of the course are group analyses of selected prominent issues in the post-Cold War world, which will include extensive research, writing, discussions, and oral presentations of the groups’ findings.

    Prerequisites: Application and permission of the instructor.
  
  • POLS 1030 - Issues in Foreign Relations II (3CR)


    (3L) (BOCES class.) This course is the second semester of the year-long seminar which entails an introduction to the concepts, institutions and issues of contemporary foreign relations from the perspective of the United States. The focal point of this course is the group research assignment.

    Prerequisites: Application, POLS 1020 , and permission of the instructor.
  
  • POLS 1100 - Wyoming Government (1CR)


    (3L, *) [E] If a student successfully completes a U.S. Government or U.S. History course with a grade of C or better at another institution, this course satisfies the statutory requirement of instruction in the constitutions of the United States and Wyoming for Casper College, but does not meet requirements for the University of Wyoming.

  
  • POLS 1200 - Non-Western Political Cultures (3CR)


    (3L) [E] This course gives students an appreciation of non-Western political cultures and how these cultures have created different political institutions and practices. Non-Western nations of Asia, Africa, and the Middle East are used as case studies.

    Cross-listed: INST 1200  
  
  • POLS 2000 - Current Issues in American Government (3CR)


    (3L) This course examines current political topics in the United States. It focuses on key public policy problems, the policy-making process and the final policy choice. Students must keep abreast of political events on a daily basis and apply basic concepts in American government to current affairs.

    Prerequisites: POLS 1000 , or permission of the instructor.
  
  • POLS 2128 - Terrorism (3CR)


    3L This course studies the theories, psychologies, motives, methods, forms, and counter measures associated with terrorism in history and the 21st century. Biannually

    Prerequisites: POLS 1000 or permission of the instructor.
  
  • POLS 2200 - Politics of Europe (3CR)


    (3L) [E] Examines formal and informal aspects of politics in Britain, other West European countries, and the European Union.

    Prerequisites: POLS 1000, or HIST 1120, or have permission of the instructor.
  
  • POLS 2290 - Governments and Politics of Latin America (3CR)


    (3L) This course studies chief cultural and historical factors influencing Latin American political process by drawing on six country case studies as well as regional information. It also surveys major institutions and political patterns of the region.

    Prerequisites: POLS 1000 , or HIST 1120 , or have permission of the instructor.
  
  • POLS 2310 - Intro to International Relations (3CR)


    (3L) [E] A theoretical and practical survey of the international political system, including concepts of power and power relationships, elements of international organizations and contemporary international relations.

    Prerequisites: HIST 1120 , or POLS 1000 , or permission of the instructor.
    Cross-listed: INST 2310  
  
  • POLS 2410 - Intro to Public Administration (3CR)


    (3L) [E] Public administration involves the core activities of government that are performed, for the most part, by highly trained experts and specialized organizations; its purpose is the development and implementation of public policy. This broad definition encompasses a large dynamic portion of government at all three levels of the federal system, engaging even nonprofit and private enterprise.

    Prerequisites: POLS 1000   

    or have permission from the instructor

  
  • POLS 2460 - Intro to Political Philosophy (3CR)


    (3L) [E] A survey of selected writings in the history of Western political theory from the classical period to the present.

    Prerequisites: POLS 1000 , or sophomore standing, or permission of the instructor.
  
  • POLS 2465 - Directed Studies in Political Science


    (1-3L) (1-3 CR) This course will center on faculty-guided research in an area of mutual interest to the student and instructor within the political science, international studies, or pre-law majors. This course has the option of including internship experience as part of the directed studies.

  
  • POLS 2470 - Internship (3CR)


    (3L) This course will differentiate from POLS 2465 Directed Study in POLS, which has been used in the past for students taking internships for credit.  The 2470 number is in line with the transfer guide for POLS internships. POLS 2470 will be offered every semester.

    Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

Professional Physical Education

  
  • PEPR 1005 - Intro to Physical Education (2CR)


    (2L) [E] Provides a general concept of the meaning and interpretation of physical education, giving specific information for the professional student of physical education and the nature of the field, its professional opportunities, personal rewards and satisfactions, and requirements of a sound program of professional preparation.

  
  • PEPR 1052 - Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries (3CR)


    (3L) [E] Theory and practical application in the field of athletic training. Emphasizes prevention and care of athletic injuries, wrapping and taping techniques.

  
  • PEPR 2012 - Physical Education for Elementary School (3CR)


    (2L, 2LB) [E] Fundamental skills and principles of movement and the progressions as they would be presented in the elementary education program. Students have practical experience in participation and teaching. Includes rhythmics and dance, gymnastics, games, and sports skills.

  
  • PEPR 2030 - Motor Learning (3CR)


    (3L) Exploration and explanation of material and methods that underlie the learning and performance of motor skills.

  
  • PEPR 2090 - Foundations of Athletic Coaching (3CR)


    (3L) Provides prospective coaches with current information about scientific foundations of coaching: theory, methodology, administration, management, and psychology. Required for athletic coaching permit in Wyoming.

  
  • PEPR 2091 - Athletic Officiating I (2CR)


    (1L, 2LB) [E] For physical education majors wishing to acquaint themselves with the skills and techniques of officiating the major sports: football, basketball, volleyball and soccer.

  
  • PEPR 2100 - Theory of Coaching: Volleyball (2CR)


    (2L) Study of the skill analysis, strategy and training involved in coaching volleyball. Includes methods of coaching.

  
  • PEPR 2135 - Personal Trainer Education (3CR)


    (3L) This course introduces students to exercise science principles, client assessment, and exercise program design. Students learn how to utilize multiple tools, skills, and knowledge to assess clients’ health and fitness. Students will further learn how to design and implement programs to improve muscular strength, cardiovascular endurance, body composition, and other health related components of fitness.

  
  • PEPR 2136 - Sports Nutrition (3CR)


    (3L) This course introduces the student to evidence-based information relating directly effective nutrition for the active as well as Athletes looking for performance enhancement.

  
  • PEPR 2150 - Theory of Coaching: Basketball (2CR)


    (2L) Methods of coaching offense and defense, styles of play, strategy, training and diet, and rules of interpretation. (Fall semester.)

  
  • PEPR 2460 - Field Experience (Physical Education)(2CR)


    (2-4LB) (1-2CR) Thirty hours per credit of hands-on experience observing/assisting/instructing in various physical education activities: swimming, fitness, gymnastics, adaptive physical education, elementary physical education and coaching.

    Prerequisites: permission of the instructor.

Psychology

  
  • PSYC 1000 - General Psychology (3CR)


    (3L) [E] One semester introductory psychology course designed to familiarize the student with the major areas of psychological research. Course orientation is directed toward understanding behavior through an experimental approach. Application of course content to everyday behavior situations is emphasized.

  
  • PSYC 2000 - Research Psychological Methods (4CR)


    (4L) [E] Introduces students to some of the methods of investigating psychological questions. Exposes students to various research strategies ranging from observational to experimental, using representative laboratory exercises, lectures, readings, films and demonstrations. Requires written and oral reports. Requires extra research time outside of class.

    Prerequisites: an introductory course in psychology, completion of ENGL 1020 , STAT 2050 , STAT 2070  or other four-hour statistic course with lab. Earned letter grade of “C” or better is required in each prerequisite course.
  
  • PSYC 2020 - Positive Psychology (3CR)


    (3L) This course introduces one of the fastest growing subfields and an emerging shift in the field of psychology from pathology to strengths and resiliency. Positive psychology explores mental health as building on the best in life by seeking to fulfill the lives of healthy individuals. Course content includes research in the areas of happiness/well-being, optimism, creativity, resilience, meaning, and gratitude, as well as practical application of these and other strength-based psychological concepts.

    Prerequisites: PSYC 1000  or SOC 1000 .
  
  • PSYC 2050 - Introductory Counseling/Clinical Theories (3CR)


    (3L) An introductory course featuring a review of the development of psychotherapy, a study of psychological concepts basic to the therapeutic process, and understanding of the major models and principles of psychotherapy.

    Prerequisites: PSYC 1000 .
  
  • PSYC 2080 - Biological Psychology (3CR)


    (3L) [E] Introduces biological bases of behavior. Includes ethnology and comparative behavior, psychobiological development, physiological and sensory mechanisms of behavior and evolution and behavioral genetics. Presents basic structural and functional properties of the nervous system.

    Prerequisites: PSYC 1000  and BIOL 1000  or equivalent.
  
  • PSYC 2155 - Motivational Interviewing (3CR)


    (3L) Behavioral change is a goal of many human service professionals. This course will examine the process of how change occurs and how to apply evidence based practices to assist clients with the change process thorough the use of motivational interviewing. Through a combination of lecture, skill practice, discussion, and personal exploration, this course will serve as a ‘hands on’ experience for the change process.

    Cross-listed: ADDN 2155  
  
  • PSYC 2200 - Human Sexuality (3CR)


    (3L) An interdisciplinary course designed to acquaint the student with the major factors affecting human sexuality. Relevant research is reviewed in biology, psychology, sociology, and anthropology, as well as religious and historical perspectives.

    Prerequisites: three to four hours of a 1000 level introductory psychology or biology course.
    Cross-listed: (Cross-listed as SOC 2200 .)
  
  • PSYC 2210 - Drugs and Behavior (3CR)


    (3L) [E] A survey of the drugs which affect behavior, emphasizing both psychotherapeutic agents and drugs with abuse potential. Includes a brief introduction to the chemistry of the brain and pharmacological aspects of each major class of psychoactive drugs will be discussed.

    Prerequisites: PSYC 1000  and three to four hours of 1000 level psychology or biology courses.
  
  • PSYC 2230 - Sports and Exercise Psychology (3CR)


    (3L) An introduction to the field of sport and exercise psychology that focuses on the major areas of psychological research and application regarding sports and exercise environments, processes, performance enhancement, health and well being.

    Prerequisites: PSYC 1000 .
  
  • PSYC 2260 - Alcoholism (3CR)


    (3L) Patterns of alcohol use and theories of abuse and addiction will be presented along with current knowledge on the incidence, health effects, economic costs, and trends in treatment. Theoretical concepts will be based on constitutional, psychological and socio-cultural approaches. Issues ranging from pharmacology to societal concerns with problem drinking will be covered.

    Prerequisites: PSYC 1000 .
  
  • PSYC 2300 - Developmental Psychology (3CR)


    (3L) [E] Provides an overview of child growth and development through adolescence using a lifespan approach, the theoretical bases for the area of child study, application of solutions to developmental problems, and the physical, psychological, social and emotional aspects of child psychology, as well as current research on the topic.

    Prerequisites: three to four hours of 1000 level introductory psychology.
  
  • PSYC 2340 - Abnormal Psychology (3CR)


    (3L) [E] A general study of abnormal behaviors including types, etiology, and treatment approaches.

    Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in PSYC 1000 
  
  • PSYC 2380 - Social Psychology (3CR)


    (3L) [E] Social Psychology familiarizes students with the psychology of human interaction. Topics addressed include aggression, altruism, attitudes, attraction, conformity, group dynamics, perception of self and others, prejudice, social roles and social power.

    Prerequisites: PSYC 1000  or equivalent.
  
  • PSYC 2390 - Acquired Brain Injuries (3CR)


    (3L) An introductory course that focuses on the major areas of research and treatment application in the field of acquired brain injuries (ABI), Various types of brain injuries, etiologies of these injuries, and treatments of these injuries will be presented.

    Prerequisites: PSYC 1000 , BIOL 1000  (or equivalent), HLTK 1200 .
  
  • PSYC 2465 - Special Problems in Psychology


    (1-3CR) Directed study and research reserved for students who have successfully completed previous course work in psychology. A comprehensive research project or in-depth literature review is required. Topics must meet with the approval of the instructor the semester prior to initiating the course. Special problem work shall proceed under direct supervision of a Casper College psychology instructor.

    Prerequisites: PSYC 2000  or concurrent enrollment, or permission of the instructor.
  
  • PSYC 2970 - Cognitive Retraining Practicum (3CR)


    (1L, 4LB) Supervised experience in working with individuals who have acquired brain injuries (ABI) in community based settings. Weekly on campus classes are conducted and students complete a minimum of 60 hours in off-campus practicum locations at cooperating treatment agencies/facilities. The class provides opportunities for students to gain practical field experience in working with individuals with brain injuries and to apply knowledge acquired in previous courses. The off-campus practicum time will be scheduled, structured, and supervised by a certified or licensed professional. S/U grading only.

    Prerequisites: PSYC 2390 , HLTK 1625 , HLTK 1620 , CPR and AED.

Radiology Technology

  
  
  
  
  • RDTK 1500 - Introduction to Radiologic Technology (1CR)


    (4LB) An orientation of the radiologic technology profession. Emphasis is on history, medical ethics, radiology administration, certification, and professional organizations. Class size is limited so preference will be given to students applying to the program.

  
  • RDTK 1530 - Patient Care and Management (2CR)*


    (2L) *Three week minimester session. Orienting student health professionals into patient care methodology in the clinical environment. Emphasis is placed on the illness process and specific nursing and radiologic patient care procedures.

  
  • RDTK 1580 - Radiographic Positioning I (2CR)*


    (1L, 2LB) *Three week minimester session. Positioning skills of the chest and abdomen; hand and wrist; forearm, elbow and humerus are emphasized.

    Prerequisites: acceptance into the Radiography Program.
  
  • RDTK 1610 - Radiographic Imaging I (3CR)


    (2L, 3LB) Identifying and demonstrating essential operating principles of x-ray machines, and the factors and ancillary equipment that contribute to the production of optimum diagnostic quality radiographs.

    Prerequisites: MATH 1400  
  
  • RDTK 1640 - Radiographic Imaging II (3CR)


    (2L, 3LB) Skills that facilitate the production of quality radiographs. Analyzing different modes of imaging and intensification systems. Emphasis is placed on primary and secondary exposure factors, recording media, and special imaging techniques. Computed radiography and digital imaging will be covered in detail.

    Prerequisites: RDTK 1610 .
  
  • RDTK 1680 - Radiographic Positioning II (3CR)


    (2.5L, 1.5LB) Positioning skills and anatomy of the lower extremity, myelography, spine radiography and arthrography. Mobile and surgical radiographic procedures will be demonstrated when applicable.

    Prerequisites: RDTK 1580 .
  
  • RDTK 1710 - 1st Yr-Clinical Education I (2CR)


    (28LB/week) This course involves a practical learning experience in the clinical radiographic environment. Students participate at pre-scheduled time periods and practice their radiographic skills for a total of 144 clinical education hours at various clinical locations. Students will be under the supervision of clinical instructors or registered radiographers during their experience. Basic skills necessary to perform entry level tasks in the clinical setting will be reviewed. Positioning skills of the chest, abdomen, hand, wrist, elbow and forearm will be covered. Radiation protection principles will be reviewed. See program policies for clinical clock hours vs credit hours description.

    Prerequisites: currently passing RDTK 1580 .
  
  • RDTK 1810 - 1st Yr-Clinical Education II (3CR)


    (13.5LB) A continuation of RDTK 1710. This course involves a practical learning experience in the clinical radiographic environment. Students participate at pre-scheduled time periods and practice their radiographic skills for a total of 195 clinical education hours at various clinical locations. Students will be under the supervision of clinical instructors or registered radiographers during their experience. Skills necessary to perform entry level tasks in the clinical setting will be reviewed. Positioning skills of the shoulder, humerus, clavicle, scapula, AC joints, and lower extremities including the pelvic girdle will be covered. See program policies for clinical clock hours vs credit hours description.

    Prerequisites: RDTK 1710 .
  
  • RDTK 1830 - Pharmacology for Radiographers (1CR)


    (1L) This course is designed to introduce the radiography student to common drugs the radiographer should be familiar with and those stocked for emergency use. The course will also include an overview of the laws governing drug administration. Venipuncture procedures and skill will be reviewed.

    Prerequisites: current enrollment in the radiography program.
  
  • RDTK 1910 - 1st Yr-Clinical Education III (3CR)


    (13.5LB) A continuation of RDTK 1810. This course involves a practical learning experience in the clinical radiographic environment. Students participate at pre-scheduled time periods and practice their radiographic skills for a total of 195 clinical education hours at various clinical locations. Students will be under the supervision of clinical instructors or registered radiographers during their experience. Skills necessary to perform entry level tasks in the clinical setting will be reviewed. Positioning skills of the spine and contrast studies will be covered. See program policies for clinical clock hours vs credit hours description.

    Prerequisites: RDTK 1610  and RDTK 1810 .
  
  • RDTK 1915 - Introduction to Computed Tomography (2CR)


    (2L) This course is designed to introduce the medical imaging student to basic aspects of computed tomography. An overview of history and technical advances related to CT, patient care and assessment specific to CT procedures, contrast media, radiation protection practices, as well as screening procedures and patient education. A basic introduction to the clinical setting will also be included.

    Prerequisites: Admission to the Computed Tomography Program.
  
  • RDTK 1920 - Computed Tomography Procedures I (3CR)


    (3L) This course covers the anatomy and common pathology associated with computer tomography. The anatomical structures will be demonstrated in the axial, sagittal and coronal imaging planes. Scanning protocols, contrast administration, and contraindications for computed tomography of the head, neck, chest, musculoskeletal, abdomen, and pelvis will be presented. Content provides detailed coverage of procedures for CT imaging. Procedures include, but are not limited to, indications for the procedure, patient education, preparation, orientation and positioning, patient history and assessment, contrast media usage, scout image, selectable scan parameters, filming and archiving of the images. CT procedures will be taught for differentiation of specific structures, patient symptomology and pathology images studied will reviewed for quality, anatomy and pathology. CT procedures vary from facility to facility and normally are dependent on the preferences of the radiologists. Patient Care, contrast media, venipuncture, CT injection procedures, radiation safety and protection will be emphasized for each of the scanning procedures.

    Prerequisites: Admission to the Computed Tomography Program, RDTK 2200 .
 

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