Jan 30, 2023  
2020-2021 Academic Catalog and Student Handbook 
    
2020-2021 Academic Catalog and Student Handbook [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Business Administration

  
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    BADM 2060 - Music Business and Copyrights (3CR)


    (3L) An introductory survey course providing a broad overview of business and legal topics in the music industry. Students will be familiarized with the nature and sources of the three income streams in the music industry: music publishing, recordings, and live entertainment. Students will also learn copyright law associated with music. Students will explore new changes in the industry brought about by the digital age and new approaches in marketing through the internet and mobile applications.

    Prerequisites: None.
  
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    BADM 2065 - Entrepreneurial Cyberlaw and E-Commerce Regulation (3CR)


    (3L) An introductory survey course providing a broad overview of business and legal topics in cyberspace with a focus towards entrepreneurs. Students will not only be familiarized with the fundamentals of cyber law and e-commerce regulation in a global business context, but also the impact of the law on the technology sector firm itself.

    Prerequisites: None.
  
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    BADM 2100 - Small Business Practices (2CR)


    (2L) For the person interested in starting his or her own business. Emphasis will be on the development of a “business plan” and the finance, accounting, management, and marketing after the business has been established.

  
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    BADM 2195 - Entrepreneurship (3CR)


    (3L) This course is designed for those students who have always wanted to start their own business, or for those that just want to explore the possibilities.

  
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    BADM 2245 - Real Estate Law (3CR)


    (3L) [E] This is an introductory survey course providing a broad overview of real estate related legal topics. More specifically, the course will cover the differences between real and personal property, define fixtures and their significance, and explore the scope of real property to the sky, air, and natural resources. There will be a section on easements, profits, and licenses. There will be discussions on the types of ownership such as joint tenancy or tenancy in common. We will discuss real estate agents, brokers, and the duties attending to those positions.

  
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    BADM 2340 - Business Organizations and Government Regulations (3CR)


    (3L) A study of the principles of agency and employment law, independent contractors, wrongful termination, worker’s compensation, civil rights act, administrative law, environmental law, antitrust, partnerships, limited partnerships, joint-ventures, corporations, subchapter S corporations, limited liability companies, franchises, security regulation, lender liability and consumer protection, and international law.

  
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    BADM 2350 - Commercial Law (3CR)


    (3L) A study of the basic principles of the law of personal and real property and its financing, water law, landlord and tenant, bailments, Uniform Commercial Code, sales, commercial paper, secured transactions, Uniform Consumer Credit Code, creditor’s remedies and suretyship, bankruptcy and reorganization, exemptions, enforcement of judgment, garnishment, and execution.


Business Office Technology

  
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    BOTK 1540 - Business English (3CR)


    (3L) For those who need a review of basic communication skills. Students study the fundamentals of grammar, punctuation, and spelling. These skills are applied to situations that occur in business offices.

  
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    BOTK 1655 - Keyboarding Speed and Accuracy (1CR)


    (2LB) This course provides students with proven techniques for improving their precision and performance. The drills are designed to increase keying speeds while maintaining a high degree of accuracy. This class offers the students the opportunity to move their keyboarding efficiency to the next level. Extra laboratory work may be required. Students need to know the keyboard. A student may take a departmental exam to challenge this course. Students successfully completing the exam will receive a grade of “S” for 1 credit.

  
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    BOTK 1660 - Document Formatting (2CR)


    (.5L, 3LB) This course emphasizes development of document formatting skills using word processing software. Students will learn to properly format those documents used in the working world: letters, memos, reports, tables, and other common and/or specialized formats. Some extra laboratory work may be necessary. Minimum keyboarding skills of 30 wpm needed.

  
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    BOTK 1955 - Professional Development (3CR)


    (3L) Designed to provide an awareness of the “people” skills essential for job success. Topics include developing a positive self-image, a professional self-image, business ethics, time management, human relations and communication skills, organizational dynamics, and career management.

  
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    BOTK 1980 - Cooperative Work Experience I


    (1-3CR) (Max. 6) The student is given the opportunity to gain practical, on-the-job experience within the student’s area of business specialization. Supervision will be by program coordinator and employer. A minimum of 80 hours of on-the-job training represents one semester hour. The student must maintain 12 credit hours with a 2.0 GPA during the semester.

    Prerequisites: Student must be a full-time business information systems major and have permission of the instructor.

Certified Occupational Therapy Assistant

  
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    COTA 2020 - Human Occupations and Life Roles (2CR)


    (1L, 2LB) The foundation of occupational therapy is purposeful activity related to development and life roles. This course provides an in-depth exploration of occupations and life roles throughout the life cycle while exploring occupational therapy theory, analysis and synthesis of occupations as performed in the various life stages. Provides discussion of influences of disability and culture to occupational performance.

    Prerequisites: Permission of OTA program director.
  
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    COTA 2100 - Psychosocial Aspects (3CR)


    (2L, 2LB) This course addresses acute and chronic psychosocial dysfunction conditions and occupational therapy’s role in providing service. Various developmental concerns and mental health settings are discussed. The OTA’s role in interventions is presented including theory, evaluation, treatment planning and intervention. Psychosocial issues in physical dysfunction are also explored.

    Prerequisites: COTA 2200 , COTA 2300 , COTA 2310 , COTA 2420 , and PSYC 1000 .
    Concurrently: Taken concurrently with COTA 2210  and COTA 2320 .
  
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    COTA 2150 - Group Dynamics (1CR)


    (2LB) This course is designed to develop effective interpersonal communication to prepare students for professional/patient interactions in clinical practice and the engagement of therapeutic use of self. An emphasis is placed on the development of basic listening skills, providing meaningful feedback, and group membership skills. This course provides an environment, which promotes sharing of ideas, attitudes and feelings, peer feedback and support of group members.

    Prerequisites: Admission into the OTA program, or permission of the OTA program director.
  
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    COTA 2160 - Leadership Skills (2CR)


    (1L, 2LB) This course promotes effective interpersonal communication for group and professional leadership, evaluation of self and others, and therapeutic-use of-self techniques necessary for effective occupational therapy service provision. Group leadership and interactive skills are practiced along with activity analysis, adapting and grading of group activities.

    Prerequisites: COTA 2150 , COTA 2200 , COTA 2300 , COTA 2310 , COTA 2420 .
    Concurrently: Taken concurrently with COTA 2100  and COTA 2210 .
  
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    COTA 2200 - Therapeutic Approaches and Media I (2CR)


    (4LB) Exploration of a variety of media and therapeutic approaches for special needs populations. Activity analysis and adaptation of activities are practiced extensively. Types of activities explored include play, education, daily living skills, social participation, work and leisure. Use of the Occupational Therapy Practice Framework is introduced and applied to practice.

  
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    COTA 2210 - Therapeutic Approaches and Media II (2CR)


    (4LB) Continuation of implementation of the Occupational Therapy Practice Framework. A variety of media will be explored for implementation with psychosocial and pediatric populations. Activity analysis, adapting, and grading of interventions for therapeutic application for these populations is the focus of this class

    Prerequisites: COTA 2020  , COTA 2200 COTA 2300 COTA 2310 COTA 2420    
    Concurrently: Taken concurrently with COTA 2100   andCOTA 2350  .
  
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    COTA 2220 - Therapeutic Approaches and Media III (3CR)


    (6LB) This course continues the exploration of service implementation for the occupational therapy assistant in the physical disabilities settings. Areas studied include daily living skills, work, leisure, education, and social participation. Techniques applied in physical disabilities settings are practiced.

    Prerequisites: COTA 2020 , COTA 2200 , COTA 2210 , COTA 2300 , COTA 2310 , COTA 2320 , COTA 2350 , and COTA 2420 .
    Concurrently: Taken concurrently with COTA 2330  and COTA 2400 .
  
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    COTA 2300 - Fieldwork Integration I (2CR)


    (1L, 2LB) An introduction to the role of working with special needs populations in the community. The role and professional expectations of occupational therapy assistants are introduced. This course provides fieldwork preparation integrated with classroom discussions. Students will complete 20 hours of clinical experience. Beginning knowledge of medical terminology is studied.

  
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    COTA 2310 - Fieldwork Integration II (2CR)


    (4LB) A continuation of pre-fieldwork course work and beginning preparation for Level I fieldwork. Primary focus on professional skills in community experiences and with special needs populations. Begin clinical documentation for OTA practitioner.

    Prerequisites: COTA 2300 .
  
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    COTA 2320 - Fieldwork Integration III (2CR)


    (4LB) Designed to prepare students for Level I and II fieldwork experiences. Students will complete Level I fieldwork in psychosocial and pediatric settings. Continuation of documentation concepts.

    Prerequisites: COTA 2020 , COTA 2300 , COTA 2310 , and COTA 2420 .
    Concurrently: Taken concurrently with COTA 2100  and COTA 2350 .
  
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    COTA 2330 - Fieldwork Integration IV (2CR)


    (4LB) A continuation of clinical readiness skills. Includes Level I experiences in developmental disabilities, physical disabilities and geriatric settings as well as preparation for Level II experiences. Clinical reasoning skills for transition from student to practitioner are an integral part of the course.

    Prerequisites: COTA 2020 , COTA 2100 , COTA 2200 , COTA 2300 COTA 2310 , COTA 2320 , COTA 2350 , and COTA 2420 .
    Concurrently: Taken concurrently with COTA 2220  and COTA 2400 .
  
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    COTA 2350 - Clinical Theory and Practice I (3CR)


    (1L, 4LB) Course examines occupational therapy theory and practice for individuals aged birth through 21 with a focus on physical disabilities and developmental dysfunction. Explores implementation of occupational therapy in a variety of settings including theory, assessment, planning treatment plan and intervention.

    Prerequisites: COTA 2020 , 2050, COTA 2200 , COTA 2300 , COTA 2310 , and COTA 2420 .
    Concurrently: Taken concurrently with COTA 2210  and COTA 2320 .
  
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    COTA 2400 - Clinical Theory and Practice II (3CR)


    (1L, 4LB) Course examines occupational theory and practice for individuals over the age of 21 with a focus on physical disabilities, neurological impairment and aging dysfunction. Explores implementation of occupational therapy including theory, assessment, treatment planning and implementation, in a variety of settings.

    Prerequisites: COTA 2020 , COTA 2200 COTA 2210 , COTA 2300 , COTA 2310 , COTA 2320 , COTA 2350 , and COTA 2420 .
    Concurrently: Taken concurrently with COTA 2220  and COTA 2330 .
  
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    COTA 2420 - Clinical Conditions (3CR)


    (3L) Specific diagnoses commonly seen by the occupational therapists are examined and application of occupational therapy techniques and theory are discussed.

    Prerequisites: Admission into the OTA Program or permission of the OTA Program Director and ZOO 2040 , ZOO 2041 , and KIN 2050 .
  
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    COTA 2450 - Health Care Systems (3CR)


    (3L) Course provides exploration of the health care system and the delivery of occupational therapy services. Topics include: reimbursement, team concepts in health care, the role of the OTA within the OT department and health care environments, levels of authority and responsibility, and familiarity with alternative health care choices.

    Prerequisites: COTA 2020 , COTA 2100 , COTA 2150 , COTA 2160 , COTA 2200 , COTA 2210 , COTA 2300 COTA 2310 , COTA 2320 , COTA 2350 , and COTA 2420 .
  
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    COTA 2500 - Fieldwork A (3CR)


    (2L, 2LB) First of two Level II fieldwork placements. Eight weeks of fieldwork in contracted facility. Includes a minimum of 40 hours a week of on-site skill practice. On-line integration of learning experiences with instructor and class members is expected.

    Prerequisites: Must have successfully completed all academic course work and Level I fieldwork.
    Concurrently: (May be taken concurrently with COTA 2550  and/or COTA 2600 .)
  
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    COTA 2550 - Fieldwork B (3CR)


    (2L, 2LB) Second of two Level II fieldwork placements. Eight weeks of fieldwork in contracted facility. Includes a minimum of 40 hours a week of on-site skill practice. On-line integration of learning experiences with instructor and class members is expected.

    Prerequisites: Must have successfully completed all academic coursework and COTA 2500 .
    Concurrently: (May be concurrently taken with COTA 2500  and/or COTA 2600 .)
  
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    COTA 2600 - Fieldwork Options


    (2-3CR) Six to eight weeks fieldwork optional for students wishing further specialized training in a particular facility. Length of training to be prearranged with school and clinical setting. On-line integration of learning experiences with instructor and class members is expected.

    Prerequisites: Must have successfully completed all academic coursework, Level I fieldwork and COTA 2500  and COTA 2550 .
    Concurrently: (May be taken concurrently with COTA 2500  and COTA 2550 .)
  
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    COTA 2975 - Independent Study in OT


    (1-3CR) (Max. 6) This course provides occupational therapy assistant students the opportunities to complete independent research/study in areas of interest within the field of occupational therapy.

    Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

Chemistry

  
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    CHEM 1000 - Intro to Chemistry (4CR)


    (3L,2LB) [E] Designed primarily for students who have not had high school chemistry or feel that they need a review, this course consists of a study of matter, atomic structure and bonding, the periodic table, chemical symbols, nomenclature and chemical equations, quantitative composition of compounds, calculations from chemical equations. Provides acceptable credit for students enrolled in agriculture, forestry, home economics, nursing, and petroleum technology. Not recommended for engineering, pre-medicine, pre-dentistry, pre-pharmacy, pre-veterinary medicine or any of the physical science majors. 

    Prerequisites: C or better in MATH 0900
    Concurrently: ( equivalent to UW CHEM 1000.)
  
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    CHEM 1025 - Chemistry I (3CR)


    (3L, *) [E] *One problem class per week. The first semester of a general course designed to meet the requirements of pre-professional, engineering, science, and liberal arts majors. Covers fundamental principles, atoms, subatomic particles, periodicity of elements, stoichiometry, bonding, oxidation states, states of matter, and solutions.

    Prerequisites: A ‘C’ or better in MATH 0930 , or an ACT math score of 23 or better. (High school chemistry strongly recommended or a ‘C’ or better in CHEM 1000 )

    (CHEM 1025 with CHEM 1028  are equivalent to UW CHEM 1020.)

  
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    CHEM 1028 - Chemistry Laboratory I (1CR)


    (3LB) [E] Introductory chemistry laboratory used to introduce the student to laboratory equipment and technique and to demonstrate some of the chemical laws discussed in CHEM 1025 . (CHEM 1025  with CHEM 1028 are equivalent to UW CHEM 1020.)

  
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    CHEM 1035 - Chemistry II (3CR)


    (3L, *) [E] *One problem class per week. The second semester of a general course designed to meet the requirements of pre-professional, engineering, science, and liberal arts majors. Covers thermodynamics, kinetics and mechanism of chemical reactions, equilibrium situations, complex equilibria, electrochemistry, descriptive chemistry, and organic chemistry.

    Prerequisites: A ‘C’ or better in both CHEM 1025  and MATH 1400 , or permission of the instructor. (CHEM 1035 with CHEM 1038  are equivalent to UW CHEM 1030.)
  
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    CHEM 1038 - Chemistry Laboratory II (1CR)


    (3LB) [E] A continuation of CHEM 1028  used to introduce more advanced technique, qualitative analysis and simple organic chemistry.

    Concurrently: To be taken concurrently with CHEM 1035 .
  
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    CHEM 2230 - Quantitative Analysis (4CR)


    (2L, 6LB) [E] The study and practice of the principles and techniques of quantitative isolation and determination of some of the elements and their compounds. The applications and limitations of the theories and operations of analytical chemistry. The solutions of problems of all types are a major part of the two weekly class periods.

    Prerequisites: CHEM 1035  or permission of the instructor.
  
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    CHEM 2300 - Intro to Organic Chemistry (4CR)


    (4L) [E] A one-semester introduction to organic chemistry with a biological emphasis. Topics covered are bonding, structure, intermolecular attractions, common and systematic nomenclature, hydrocarbons, alcohols, phenols, mercaptans, ethers, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and their derivatives, amines, stereochemistry, carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, proteins, nucleic acids, heterocycles, natural products, and polymers. Students needing organic laboratory credit should enroll concurrently in CHEM 2325 .

    Prerequisites: CHEM 1000  or CHEM 1025 .
  
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    CHEM 2320 - Organic Chemistry I (3CR)


    (3L, *) [E] *One problem class per week. First of a two-semester sequence in modern organic chemistry. Topics covered are bonding, structure, alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, kinetics, stereochemistry, cycloaliphatic compounds, aromaticity, and arenes.

    Prerequisites: CHEM 1035 , or permission of the instructor.
    Concurrently: To be taken concurrently with CHEM 2325 .
  
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    CHEM 2325 - Organic Chemistry Laboratory I (1CR)


    (3LB) This laboratory involves instruction in fundamental organic laboratory techniques including simple synthesis and use of gas chromatography.

    Concurrently: To be taken concurrently with CHEM 2320  or CHEM 2300 .
  
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    CHEM 2340 - Organic Chemistry II (3CR)


    (3L, *) [E] *One problem class per week. A continuation of CHEM 2320 . Topics covered are spectroscopy (mass spectrometry, infrared, ultraviolet and nuclear magnetic resonance) haloalkanes, alcohols, ethers, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and their derivatives, phenols, carbohydrates, polymers, and natural products.

    Prerequisites: CHEM 2320 .
    Concurrently: To be taken concurrently with CHEM 2345 .
  
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    CHEM 2345 - Organic Chemistry Laboratory II (1CR)


    (3LB) Involves detailed synthetic preparations and spectral and chemical analysis of the products.

    Concurrently: To be taken concurrently with CHEM 2340 .
  
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    CHEM 2465 - Research Problems in Chemistry (1CR)


    (3LB) A comprehensive research study in which the student performs under graduate chemical research under the direction of a principal investigator.

    Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.

Chinese

  
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    CHIN 1010 - First Year Chinese I (4CR)


    (4L) [E] This course is intended for students who have never studied Chinese at the college level. Students will learn the fundamentals of the Chinese language through listening, speaking, reading, and writing activities at the ACTFL (American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages) Novice Low Level. The course will also introduce students to the culture of various Chinese-speaking countries and areas. Language laboratory times are required as needed. Students who want to take for credit the next course in the sequence must complete this course with a grade of “C” or better.

    Prerequisites: None
  
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    CHIN 1020 - First Year Chinese II (4CR)


    (4L) [E] This course is a continuation of the objectives in CHIN 1010. Students will become more proficient in basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing Chinese and will further their grammatical study of the Chinese language at the ACTFL (American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages) Novice Mid- Level. The course will continue to introduce students to the cultures of various Chinese-speaking countries and areas. Language laboratory times are required as needed.

    Prerequisites: A grade of “C” or better in CHIN 1010 , CLEP test result, equivalent of 6-8 semesters of high school Chinese with a cumulative “B” average or better in those classes, or instructor’s permission.

Cisco

  
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    CSCO 2000 - Beginning Internetworking (3CR)


    (3L) This class focuses solely on networking fundamentals and is not specific to Cisco products or technologies. Student learning will include an understanding of the OSI networking model, networking components, premises wiring, industry standards, networking topologies and designs, and professional practices. Project learning experiences will include designing networks and the installation of network premises cabling.

  
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    CSCO 2010 - Advanced Internetworking I (3CR)


    (2L, 2LB) This course is the second semester of a four semester CCNA (Cisco Certified Network Associate) certification based training program. This class focuses on router configuration and applying the networking principles outlined in CSCO 2000 to real world situations. Specific topics include router components and features, intermediate IP addressing, routing protocols, router modes and functions, access control lists and network design.

    Prerequisites: CSCO 2000 or permission of instructor
  
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    CSCO 2020 - Advanced Internetworking II (4CR)


    (4L) This course is the third and fourth semesters of a four semester CCNA (Cisco Certified Network Associate) certification based training program. This class focuses on the application of advanced routing protocols such as OSPF and EIGRP, advanced IP addressing, LAN switching and VLAN design, and the configuration of wide area network access using the point-to-point protocol (PPP), ISDN, and frame relay.

    Prerequisites: CSCO 2010 .
  
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    CSCO 2035 - CCNA Certification Exam Review (1CR)


    (1L) This course will be a thorough review of the Cisco CCNA Certification Exam requirements. Using lectures, flash cards and electronic testing, students will be presented with a complete outline of exam requirements and will be able to accurately gauge their level of preparedness to take the exam.

    Prerequisites: None (should be preparing to sit for the CCNA Exam)

Civil Engineering

  
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    CE 2070 - Engineering Surveying (3CR)


    (2L, 4LB) [E] Principles and theory of land surveying for engineering students. The use and care of the surveyor’s chain, level, and theodolite. Error theory and propagation of errors in measurement and calculations. Traverse measurement and adjustment, stadia for mapping, and solar angle for line bearing. Methods of public land and municipal surveying.

    Prerequisites: MATH 1450 or high school equivalent

Communication

  
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    COMM 1000 - Intro to Mass Media (3CR)


    (3L) [E] Explores the nature and function of the mass media in contemporary society. Begins by examining some major theoretical conceptions of the communication process, concentrating on how communication creates and sustains culture. Other topics include the effects of the media on media consumers, special characteristics of the various media, and public policy issues in regard to mass media.

  
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    COMM 1020 - Workplace Communication (3CR)


    3L Designed to introduce students to best communication practices for the 21st century workplace. This course is presentation-centered, but also introduces pertinent communication theory. Yearly in the fall semester

  
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    COMM 1030 - Interpersonal Communication (3CR)


    (3L) [E] Focuses on face-to face relationships in interpersonal communication settings. Self-concept, perception, language, nonverbal channels, listening, and emotions are presented as factors in dyadic relationships.

  
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    COMM 1040 - Intro to Human Communication (3CR)


    (3L) [E] An introduction to the nature and function of human symbolic communication in its various settings. The role of symbolic communication on the interpersonal level as a method of establishing and defining human relationships will be examined, as will the relationship of symbolic communication to the establishment and maintenance of larger behavioral, economic, and cultural processes and structures.

  
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    COMM 1060 - Forensics I (1CR)


    (2LB) For those students interested in competing in events sponsored by the National Community College Speech Association.

  
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    COMM 1080 - Talking With: (Subtitle) (1CR)


    (1L) (Max. 3) This course will focus on unique or specific communication situations, for which there are often special strategies or rules for effective communication.

  
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    COMM 1505 - Communication for Professional Success


    (1-3CR) A practical approach to improving communication in the workplace. This course presents principles and practices for business and professional employees in three areas: personal skills (Interpersonal Communication), group skills (Small Group Communication), and presentation skills (Public Speaking and Interviewing). The course may be taken for three credits as a whole, or individually for one credit each.

  
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    COMM 2010 - Public Speaking (3CR)


    (3L) An introductory course in public speaking. The emphasis is on theory, speech development, and practice as the student is introduced to a variety of speaking situations from impromptu talks to platform speeches. This course will fulfill the C2 requirement for the University of Wyoming.

  
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    COMM 2060 - Forensics II (1CR)


    (2LB) (Max. 2) For those interested in competing in those events sponsored by Phi Rho Pi, the national community college speech association. Students will attend and participate in intercollegiate forensics as members of the forensics squad of Casper College.

    Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.
  
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    COMM 2090 - Intro to Persuasion (3CR)


    (3L) [E] Human communication as a change agent is studied along with relationships of attitudes to behavior with emphasis on behavioral research and contemporary theories.

    Prerequisites: COMM 2010  or permission of instructor.
  
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    COMM 2100 - Reporting and News Writing (3CR)


    (2L, 2LB)3 [E] Learning the meaning of news, beginning newswriting, development of news sources, selection and organization of information, variations in types of news, the developments and trends of journalistic forms, and social and legal responsibilities of the press. Practice in gathering and writing news. Preparation of articles for campus newspaper.

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010  or permission of instructor.
  
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    COMM 2110 - Nonverbal Communication (3CR)


    (3L) [E] This course focuses on the elements, functions, and impacts of nonverbal communication in human communication. Students are introduced to the research and theory, as well as the practical applications, in their interactions with others.

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010  or permission of instructor.
  
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    COMM 2120 - Small Group Communication (3CR)


    (3L) [E] Communication behavior in small group situations is explored; networks, dynamics, leadership roles, member functions, and decision-making behavior.

    Prerequisites: COMM 2010  or COMM 1030  or permission of instructor.
  
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    COMM 2125 - Family Communication (3CR)


    (3L) Designed to explore the role that communication plays in family functioning.

    Prerequisites: COMM 1030  or permission of instructor.
  
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    COMM 2135 - Gender, Communication and Culture (3CR)


    (3L) This course provides both a theoretical and real-life view, for both genders, on how our communication in work, school, social and relationship settings help shape and design our gender constructs.

  
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    COMM 2145 - Mentoring Communication


    (1-2CR) This course will focus on unique or specific communication situations associated with serving as a mentor for elementary students between the ages of 8 - 11 and the application of special strategies or rules for effective communication in those situations. This course is associated with the Help Yourself Academy, an after-school program designed to offer Title 1 NCSD elementary students (grades 3 - 6) the opportunity to focus on a math and science curriculum.

    Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.
  
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    COMM 2150 - Argumentation (3CR)


    (3L) [E] Students will be introduced to the elements of effective argument - including evidence, reasoning, case construction and presentation skills to bring about changes in belief and conviction. Warning: This course focuses on current controversial issues and students may be asked to present arguments that differ from their own personal positions on those issues. The intent of the course is not to change students’ minds, but they will critically evaluate their own political and philosophical beliefs and opinions.

    Prerequisites: COMM 2010  or permission of instructor.
  
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    COMM 2190 - Basic Video Production (3CR)


    (2L, 2LB) Basic camera operation, sound, lighting, scriptwriting, planning, budgeting, and editing introduce the fundamentals of corporate and educational single-camera video production. Students will work in a variety of crew positions to create private or institutional videotapes.

  
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    COMM 2200 - Broadcast Production (3CR)


    (2L, 2LB) [E] Introduction to the fundamental technical and production concepts in radio, television, and motion pictures. Actual experience with equipment and an understanding of its operation are emphasized.

    Prerequisites: COMM 2190  or permission of the instructor.
  
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    COMM 2300 - Intro to Public Relations (3CR)


    (3L) This course provides a foundation of the nature and purpose of proper public relations skills and programs in any given business, organization, or situation.  Students will develop writing skills and techniques using various public relations tools/tactics and understand the importance of research and planning in creating a public relations program.  Identification of publics, persuasive techniques, media ethics and law, message strategies, and research methods pertaining to public relations are topics emphasized. Once a year, likely each fall.

  
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    COMM 2340 - Editing and Production (3CR)


    (3L) Evaluation, selection and preparation of news copy for publication. Practice in copy reading, proof reading, headline writing, and page layout. Use of photography and advertising in page layout.

    Prerequisites: COMM 2100 .
  
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    COMM 2355 - Intro to Media Photography (3CR)


    (3L)3 This course is designed for students to gain a general understanding of digital camera operation and the development of photojournalism and its role in a visually-oriented world. Students will used both film and digital cameras for their photographs and will learn how to manipulate them in Adobe Photoshop.

  
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    COMM 2380 - Cinema History (3CR)


    (3L) [E] A study of the development of film from 1895 to the present in relation to historical forces shaping the film industry in the form of artistic movements, world history, popular taste, technology, economics, and politics. Weekly screening of historically significant films supplement readings, lectures, and discussions.

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010  or permission of instructor.
  
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    COMM 2390 - Independent Publications (1CR)


    (2LB) (Max. 3CR) Students interested in work on the newspaper or the literary/art magazine will work in advertising, photography, records, circulation, editorial and or writing/editing.

    Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.
  
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    COMM 2470 - Communication Internship


    (1-3CR) (Max. 6) This course is designed for students wishing to gain work experience using communication skills. This is an unpaid internship. The student will complete 80 hours of work for 1 credit hour. The student will be evaluated by his/her supervisor at work as well as several visits by the instructor. This course may be repeated to a maximum of 6 credit hours.

    Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.
  
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    COMM 2475 - Independent Study


    (1-3CR) (Max. 6) An opportunity for students to develop projects in their particular area of interest within the communication discipline.

    Prerequisites: COMM 1040 , consent of instructor, and completion of at least six hours of 2000 level CO/M credits.
  
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    COMM 2480 - Cooperative Work Experience


    (1-3CR) (Max. 6) Laboratory work consists of paid on-the-job training independently arranged and accompanied by academic instruction.

    Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.
  
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    COMM 2520 - Intro to Social Media (3CR)


    (3L) This course will introduce methods for analyzing and understanding how people apply social media technologies and their societal implications. The course will offer real world examples to help students use tools like Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Tumblr and YouTube in creating content and communication plans for organizations and businesses. In addition, students will learn how to manage their own identity or brand through various forms of social media.

    Prerequisites: None

Computer Applications

  
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    CMAP 1500 - Computer Keyboarding (1CR)


    (2LB) This course will give students hands-on experience with the microcomputer keyboard for application in computer usage. Designed for students with no previous keyboarding instruction. Extra laboratory work may be required. Available for S/U or letter grade.

  
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    CMAP 1505 - Introduction to Computers (1CR)


    (.5, 1LB) This course is designed as an introductory course for students new to the computer realm. It is a general overview of pertinent aspects computer users need to know. Topics include different types of computers and the features that make them unique, computer networking, computer hardware and peripheral devices, an overview of operating systems and the tasks they provide, an introduction to computer software applications, the role of privacy and security in the digital environment, how to use the World Wide Web by navigating and searching the web, concepts related to ecommerce and consumer safety, and exposure to the social aspect of the web.

  
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    CMAP 1506 - Computer Keyboarding II (1CR)


    (.5, 1LB) This course is designed for students with limited typing skills who need to improve technique, speed or accuracy. This course is intended to give students additional hands-on experience using the computer keyboard to improve speed and accuracy while learning word processing skills. Students need to know proper keyboarding techniques and keyboard layout. Extra laboratory work may be required.

    Prerequisites: CMAP 1500  or permission of the instructor.
  
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    CMAP 1550 - E-Portfolio Development (1CR)


    (.5L, 1LB) This course is designed for students to create a developmental electronic learning record that will provide reflection upon their learning and evidence of achievement in their particular field of study. Professional items will be added such as a resume, cover letter, and other pertinent examples to substantiate learning of assessment purposes for prospective employment. Technical skills include file management, media creation and upload. Information relevant to the aesthetics and functionality of e-portfolios will also be provided.

  
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    CMAP 1610 - Windows I (2CR)


    (1L, 2LB) This course is an introduction to the Windows operating system. The fundamentals of the Windows operating system will be explored. Students will learn to use the help, my computer, and Internet features of Windows. In addition, they will learn how to manage files and organize disks, how to customize the desktop, how to share data between programs, how to perform primary system maintenance, and they will be exposed to the multimedia/Internet functions of Windows. Windows experience is recommended.

  
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    CMAP 1615 - Operating Systems (3CR)


    (3L) This course is an introductory course on the basics of computer operating systems including file systems, configuration, inter-process communication, security, administration, interfacing, multitasking, and performance analysis. The effect of additional technologies such as multi-core processing, wireless technologies, PDA and telephone operating systems are also explored. Specific information related to Linux, Windows and UNIX operating systems will be examined at the end of the semester.

  
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    CMAP 1700 - Word Processing I (1CR)


    (.5L, 1LB) The following techniques will be presented: creating documents, deleting and inserting text, moving, copying, printing, formatting, using multiple documents, finding and replacing text, and running a spelling check. Extra laboratory work may be required. Keyboarding ability recommended.

  
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    CMAP 1705 - Word Processing II (1CR)


    (.5L, 1LB) The following techniques will be presented: additional editing and formatting skills, some DOS features, page numbering, boilerplates, special printing effects, math maneuvers, merge printing of form letters and envelopes, and producing mailing labels. Extra laboratory work may be required. Keyboarding ability.

  
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    CMAP 1710 - Word Processing III (1CR)


    (.5L, 1LB) The following techniques will be presented: preparing fill-in documents, conditional merge printing, automating document assembly, merging with math, creating tables of contents and indexes, adding soft fonts, working with data bases and spreadsheets, keyboarding macros and using additional advanced features. Extra laboratory work may be required.

    Prerequisites: CMAP 1705 .
  
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    CMAP 1715 - Word Processing (3CR)


    (1L, 4LB) Will cover basic through advanced functions of word processing software. Training will be provided on microcomputers in the origination, processing, editing, and output of the document cycle. Various formats, applications, and exercises will be utilized to produce a variety of professional documents. Extra laboratory work may be required. A keyboarding speed of 30 wpm is needed to succeed. Completion of CMAP 1700 , CMAP 1705  and CMAP 1710  (for a total of 3 credits) is equivalent to CMAP 1715.

  
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    CMAP 1750 - Spreadsheet Applications I (1CR)


    (.5L, 1LB) Designed to integrate information processing and spreadsheet problems and to create applications for the modern business environment. Extra laboratory work may be required.

  
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    CMAP 1755 - Spreadsheet Applications II (1CR)


    (.5L, 1LB) This course is designed to integrate information processing and intermediate level spreadsheet problems and to create applications for the modern business environment.

    Prerequisites: CMAP 1750  or permission of the flex lab instructor.
  
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    CMAP 1760 - Spreadsheet Applications III (1CR)


    (.5L, 1LB) This course is designed to integrate information processing and advanced level spreadsheet problems and to create applications for the modern business environment.

    Prerequisites: CMAP 1755  or permission of the flex lab instructor.
  
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    CMAP 1765 - Spreadsheet Applications (3CR)


    (2L, 2LB) This course covers the features of Microsoft Excel. Topics include creating worksheets, charts, formulas; developing functions, formatting, Web queries, What-If analysis; creating static and dynamic Web pages, data tables, financial schedules; creating, sorting, and querying a list; creating templates; working with multiple worksheets and workbooks, object linking and embedding (OLE), using macros, importing data, and working with Pivot Charts. Completion of CMAP 1750 , CMAP 1755  and CMAP 1760  (for a total of 3 credits) is equivalent to CMAP 1765.

  
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    CMAP 1800 - Database Applications I (1CR)


    (.5L, 1LB) The following operations will be presented: designing, creating, editing, sorting, indexing, and searching database files. Database files will be used with Wizards to create queries, tables, forms, and reports. Keyboarding skill equivalent of 20 wpm is needed to succeed.

  
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    CMAP 1805 - Database Applications II (1CR)


    (.5L, 1LB) This course is designed to integrate information processing and intermediate level database problems and to create applications for the modern business environment.

    Prerequisites: CMAP 1800  or permission of the flex lab instructor.
  
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    CMAP 1810 - Database Applications III (1CR)


    (.5L, 1LB) This course is designed to integrate information processing and advanced level database problems and to create applications for the modern business environment.

    Prerequisites: CMAP 1805  or permission of the flex lab instructor.
  
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    CMAP 1815 - Database Applications (3CR)


    (2L, 2LB) The following operations will be presented: designing, creating, editing, sorting, indexing, and searching database files. Database files will be used with Wizards to create queries, tables, forms, and reports. Students will apply operations and learn to use multiple databases, create advanced queries and custom forms and reports, integrate documents with other programs, and use the World Wide Web and hyperlink fields. Keyboarding skills equivalent to 20 wpm are needed to succeed. Completion of CMAP 1800 , CMAP 1805  and CMAP 1810  (for a total of 3 credits) is equivalent to CMAP 1815.

  
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    CMAP 1850 - Document Publishing I (1CR)


    (.5L, 1LB) This is an introductory course to desktop publishing using current desktop publishing software. Students will learn desktop publishing concepts necessary to create flyers, brochures, and newsletter. They will also learn to create custom publications from scratch. Individual skills will be developed related to text editing, graphic design and editing, the use of placeholders, editing templates; and the creation of color schemes, font schemes, and customized building blocks. Extra laboratory work may be required. Keyboarding and work processing skills are strongly recommended for successful completion of this course.

 

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