Aug 09, 2022  
2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog and Student Handbook 
    
2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog and Student Handbook [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Other Courses

  
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    CE 0000 - Cultural Environment Requirement (3CR)


    The Cultural environment requirement may be satisfied by completing classes designated as Global Studies, Foreign Language, Humanities, Social & Behavioral Science, or Visual & Performing Arts. Some programs restrict the categories from which students may choose, or designate the course to be used to fulfill the requirement.
     

    Courses used to satisfy the cultural environment requirement for graduation must be selected from the following departments or courses: art (ART), AAST 1000, BADM 2050, BADM 2060, COMM 2380, dance (DANC), EDCI 2250, ENGL 1030, ENGL 1040, ENGL 2006, ENGL 2011, ENGL 2020, ENGL 2050, ENGL 2055, ENGL 2060, ENGL 2080, ENGL 2130, ENGL 2140, ENGL 2150, ENGL 2185, ENGL 2210, ENGL 2220, ENGL 2225, ENGL 2230, ENGL 2235, ENGL 2270, ENGL 2310, ENGL 2320, ENGL 2350, ENGL 2440, humanities (HUMN), INST 2350, philosophy (PHIL), music (MUSC) [a maximum of four credit hours in music studio and ensembles], POLS 2290, POLS 2460, RELI 1000, theatre (THEA), WMST 1080, WMST 2020, WMST 2021, WMST 2025, WMST 2040, or world languages: ASL 1200. ASL 1220, ASL 2200, ASL 2220, French (FREN), German (GERM), Japanese (JAPN), Latin (LATN), Russian (RUSS), or Spanish (SPAN).

  
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    COMM 0000 - Written and Oral Communication Requirement (3CR)


    Courses used to satisfy the second communication requirement for graduation must be selected from the following departments or courses: BADM 1020, BOTK 1540, communication (COMM), COMM 2010, ENGL 1010, ENGL 1020, ENGL 2005 or ENGL 2020. Students in A.A., A.S., A.D.N., and A.B. degrees are required to complete ENGL 1010 and need to verify with their advisers which second approved English composition course they should complete for their specific degree requirements.

  
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    GEL 0000 - General Electives


    any 1000 or 2000 level course from the the general education areas of Reasoning and Inquiry in Science,Communication, Human Behavior, Cultural Environment and Math Computation

  
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    HU 0000 - Human Behavior Requirements (3CR)


    Courses used to satisfy the human behavior requirement for graduation must be selected from the following departments or courses: AGEC 1010, AGEC 1020, anthropology (ANTH), addictionology (ADDN), criminal justice (CRMJ), economics (ECON), GNDR 1000, geography (GEOG), history (HIST), political science (POLS), psychology (PSYC), or sociology (SOC).

  
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    LS 0000 - Lab Science Requirement (4CR)


    Courses used to satisfy the general education reasoning and inquiry in science requirement for graduation must be selected from the following departments or courses and must include a lab:

    Life Science Category:  biology (BIOL), (ENR) environment and natural resources, life science (LIFE), molecular biology (MOLB), or zoology (ZOO).

    Physical Science Category: astronomy (ASTR), atmospheric science (ATSC), chemistry (CHEM), geology (GEOL), GEOG 1010, physics (PHYS),

  
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    PEAC 0000 - Physical Education Requirement (1CR)


    Courses that may be used to satisfy the physical education requirement for graduation must be selected from the following departments or courses: physical education activity (PEAC) and physical education varsity sports (PEAT).

  
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    PEL 0000 - Program Electives


    Courses used to satisfy the program electives must be selected from within your program or the selected departments, courses, or the electives list below.

  
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    WL 0000 - World Language (4CR)


    (4L) Courses used to satisfy the world language requirement can be selected from the following prefixes: ASL, FREN, RUSS, SPAN and complete in order by semester 1010 First Year I, 1020 First year II, 2030 Second Year I, 2040 Second Year II.


Accounting

  
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    ACCT 1000 - Intro to Accounting (4CR)


    (4L) This course focuses on the methods, processes, and strategies necessary to analyze and understand the data used in accounting. The student will practice skills of identifying, classifying, reporting, and interpreting accounting information. Students will work problems dealing with preparation of financial statements, adjustment of information at end-of-period accounting cycles, and interpretation of the results thereof.

  
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    ACCT 1005 - Practical Accounting (4CR)


    (3L, 2LB) Examines the fundamental concepts and procedures used in the preparation of basic financial statements of business entities. This course also covers some of the basic procedures for QuickBooks
    software and employer payroll taxes. This course will provide you with a good foundation for ACCT 1010. No credit will be given for ACCT 1005 if the student has previously earned credit in ACCT 1010 or it’s equivalent.

  
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    ACCT 2010 - Principles of Accounting I (4CR)


    (4L) [E] Examines the fundamental concepts and procedures used in the preparation of the basic financial statements of business entities. Covers generally accepted accounting principles, accounting terminology, the usefulness of financial statements, and the role that judgment plays in accounting.

    Prerequisites: A “C” or better in ACCT 1000 , ACCT 1005   or MATH 0930 , or an ACT Math Score of 23 or better, or an appropriate Placement exam score within the past year.
  
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    ACCT 2020 - Principles of Accounting II (4CR)


    (4L) [E] A continuation of ACCT 2010 . Accounting for corporations and partnerships. Examines reports and information needed by the management of a business to make good decisions. The role accounting information plays in aiding the functions of planning, budgeting, and control is examined.

    Prerequisites: ACCT 2010 .
  
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    ACCT 2110 - QuickBooks Accounting (3CR)


    (2L, 2LB) This course combines the use of QuickBooks Desktop and the cloud based version of Quickbooks Online. QuickBooks Desktop will be used to create a company and record Sales, Receivables, Payables, and Purchases for a service type business. These files will then be converted to QuickBooks Online software and similar entries will be recorded for merchandising transactions. End of period accounting will be covered in both types of software.

    Prerequisites: ACCT 1005   or ACCT 1000 , or ACCT 2010    and CMAP 1200 , or permission of the instructor.
  
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    ACCT 2115 - Advanced QuickBooks (3CR)


    (2L,2LB) This course is an advanced course that combines the use of QuickBooks Desktop and the cloud-based version QuickBooks Online.  It is a continuation of ACCT 2110 that will include managing inventory, budgets, payroll and other advanced functions of both QuickBooks Desktop and QuickBooks Online. At the conclusion of this course, the student should be prepared to take the certifying exam and become certified in both types of software.

    Prerequisites: ACCT 2110 or prior QuickBooks experience
  
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    ACCT 2120 - Computer Spreadsheet Accounting (2CR)


    (2L, 2LB) This course prepares students to interact with computerized accounting systems. Major concepts of computerized accounting will be introduced including trial balance maintenance and financial statement generation. A commonly used spreadsheet program will be used throughout the course.

    Prerequisites: ACCT 2010   
  
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    ACCT 2230 - Intermediate Accounting I (4CR)


    (4L) [E] A study of accounting principles and procedures with emphasis on analysis, interpretation, and controls. Financial statements are studied in detail from both the theoretical and practical standpoints, with a critical examination and evaluation of areas covered. (Fall semester.)

    Prerequisites: ACCT 2020    or ACCT 2510  
  
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    ACCT 2420 - Intermediate Accounting II (4CR)


    (4L) [E] A continuation of ACCT 2230 . (Spring semester.)

    Prerequisites: ACCT 2230 .
  
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    ACCT 2430 - Income Tax (3CR)


    (3L) This course is an introduction to federal taxation of the income of individuals. Examples and problems illustrate tax laws. Computer applications may be used to illustrate specific examples.

  
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    ACCT 2460 - Payroll Accounting (3CR)


    (3L) This course examines the fundamental concepts and procedures used in payroll accounting. Usually, payroll is the largest expense of most businesses and a continuing management challenge in terms of cost control. This course will explore payroll laws and recordkeeping requirements, running a payroll, payroll reporting and accounting procedures, and payroll systems and policies.

    Prerequisites: ACCT 2010 , or permission of the instructor.
  
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    ACCT 2480 - Cooperative Education (1-3CR) (Max. 6)


    The student is afforded the opportunity to gain practical, on-the-job experience under the supervision of the accounting program coordinator and employer. A minimum of 80 hours of on the-job training represents one semester hour. The student must maintain 12 credit hours with a 2.0 GPA during the semester.

    Prerequisites: Full-time accounting major and permission of the program coordinator.
  
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    ACCT 2510 - Accounting for Bookkeepers (4CR)


    (4L) This course is designed to provide a foundation in financial accounting and tax for individuals wishing to have a career in bookkeeping. It completes the financial accounting topics started in ACCT 2010.

    Prerequisites: ACCT 2010  
  
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    ACCT 2800 - Certified Bookkeeper Exam Review (3CR)


    (3L) The Certified Bookkeeper Exam Review is a course that will prepare students for the Certified Bookkeeper Exam that is administered by the American Institute of Professional Bookkeepers. Topics covered include adjustments, error correction, payroll, depreciation, inventory and internal controls.


Addictionology

  
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    ADDN 1020 - Foundations of Substance Use Disorders Counseling I (3CR)


    (3L) The history of addictive disorders along with the contexts in which prevention and treatment evolved, provide a foundation for understanding the present conditions in the profession, and the framework for understanding future evolution. This includes the knowledge of how the profession developed from various non-professional experiences, how other disciplines succeeded or failed in dealing with addictive disorder, as well as the social and political forces that impacted upon service delivery.

  
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    ADDN 1050 - Crime and Drugs (3CR)


    (3L) This course provides students with an opportunity to explore human behavior from an addiction and criminal justice perspective. This course will provide an in-depth analysis of evidence-based crime policy with coverage of drug use, crime victimization, and incarceration trends.

  
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    ADDN 1520 - Anger, Addiction and Trauma (3CR)


    (3L) This course provides students with an opportunity to explore anger and trauma from an addiction perspective.

  
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    ADDN 2005 - Group Process (3CR)


    (3L) This course provides students with an opportunity for the study of groups and group process. These topics include, but are not limited to: development of groups, group work, group dynamics, group leadership, group process, groups for children, adolescents, adults and elderly, and specialty groups and theoretical perspectives of groups.

    Prerequisites: PSYC 2155  
  
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    ADDN 2010 - Addictions Assessment (3CR)


    (3L) Provides an overview of the process of assessment of addictive behaviors including alcohol and drugs, smoking, and eating disorders. Foci are on the behavioral, psychological/cognitive-expectational, and physiological components of specific addictive behaviors.

    Prerequisites: Seven credit hours of psychology.
  
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    ADDN 2015 - Ethics and Professional Issues (3CR)


    (3L) Provides an opportunity for study of selected ethical and professional topics in counseling.

  
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    ADDN 2100 - Foundations of Substance Use Disorder Counseling II (3CR)


    (3L) Introduces the profession of addictive disorders and the development the knowledge of the local health and social service delivery systems (especially the addiction and prevention systems), educational systems, criminal justice systems, and related professional, to better provide comprehensive services to clients/patients. Legal requirements and professional attitudes regarding these systems and the skills to accept, and make, appropriate referrals are essential for providing quality prevention and treatment services.

  
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    ADDN 2155 - Motivational Interviewing (3CR)


    (3L) Behavioral change is a goal of many human service professionals. This course will examine the process of how change occurs and how to apply evidence based practices to assist clients with the change process thorough the use of motivational interviewing. Through a combination of lecture, skill practice, discussion, and personal exploration, this course will serve as a ‘hands on’ experience for the change process.

    Cross-listed: PSYC 2155  
  
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    ADDN 2470 - Addiction Practicum (3CR)


    (1L, 4LB) Advanced addictionology students integrate previous academic learning in a scheduled and structured supervised experience in a cooperating treatment agency or facility under the supervision of a licensed professional. Students will serve a minimum of 150 hours during the semester and also attend one weekly 50-minute seminar class session. Students are required to document being addiction free for a minimum of 18 months prior to enrollment. S/U grading only.

    Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

African American Studies

  
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    AAST 1000 - Intro to African American Studies (3CR)


    (3L) [E] This course provides a historical survey of the people of Black African heritage prior to their arrival in America and thereafter.


Agriculture

  
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    AGRI 1010 - Introduction to Agricultural Technology (2CR)


    (1L, 2LB) [E] Introduces and familiarizes students with computer applications and programs that can practically be used in agriculture. This course exposes students to other types of technology used in agricultural practices such as UAS and precision agriculture.

  
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    AGRI 1020 - GPS and GIS in Agriculture (2CR)


    (1L, 2LB) A look at applications of GIS and GPS technology as it pertains to the agricultural industry. Students will learn basic GIS, GPS and cartographic principles and apply them to help solve problems or answer questions in the Ag industry. Also will use other technologies such as GPS collars to track livestock grazing and remote sensed satellite imagery to help ascertain the health of grazing lands and estimate AUMs.

    Prerequisites: AGRI 1010  or permission of the instructor.
  
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    AGRI 2000 - Agricultural Chemicals I (3CR)


    (3L) Designed to develop an understanding of agricultural chemicals, their principles and safety. Because agriculture is said to be the nation’s most dangerous industry, a special emphasis will be given to chemical safety, environmental and consumer hazards, and impacts along with federal and state laws governing agriculture chemicals. (Fall semester.)

  
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    AGRI 2010 - Agricultural Chemicals II (3CR)


    (3L) A course designed to develop an understanding of agricultural chemicals and their principles that are reviewed and applied to herbicides, insecticides, and fertilizers as they relate to crop and livestock production. The students become familiar with selection methods, rates, and methods of application.

  
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    AGRI 2475 - Independent Study in Agriculture (1-3CR) (Max. 3)


    A comprehensive research study. Upon completing the project the student should present a paper and oral seminar to a committee selected by the project instructor. The problem and amount of credit received must have the approval of the instructor.

    Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.
  
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    AGRI 2485 - Ranch Management Seminar (2CR)


    (1L, 2LB) This seminar style course will bring together all of the RMC candidate’s coursework, professional interests and focus into one course. The CC faculty and successful professionals from around the United States will be used as resources and guest speakers in order to ready and push the candidates for their internship and professional career. Candidates of the RMC Program will be required to make a major presentation and defense, of a subject/self study, decided upon themselves and their major professor, to the CC Agriculture Department during this course Only offered in the Spring Semester


Agricultural Economics

  
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    AGEC 1010 - Agricultural Macroeconomics (3CR)


    (3L) [E] Introduces students to the field of economics and how human behavior drives markets. Key macroeconomic concepts of financial markets, inflation, unemployment, gross domestic product, and national income are evaluated. Agricultural examples are primarily utilized with some non-agricultural examples.

  
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    AGEC 1020 - Agricultural Microeconomics (3CR)


    (3L) [E] Introduces students to how firms and households behave economically in the environment in which they operate. Key microeconomic concepts of production and consumption theory, market structures, and governmental impact on firms and households are evaluated. Agricultural examples are primarily utilized with some non-agricultural examples.

  
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    AGEC 1100 - Introduction to Computerized Ag Records (3CR)


    (3L) This course is an introduction to farm and ranch computerized records management. It covers basic farm/ranch accounting functions including all financial statements (flow of funds, income statement and balance sheet). The course compares cash versus accrual accounting and the benefits of each. The focus of this course is to develop and reinforce accounting and record management principles by utilizing the microcomputer and entering case farm/ranch data.

  
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    AGEC 2010 - Farm-Ranch Business Records (3CR)


    (3L) [E] The mechanics of farm record keeping and its use as a management tool. The laboratory exercises are actual problems in farm and ranch management and record keeping. Fall Only

  
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    AGEC 2020 - Farm-Ranch Business Management (4CR)


    (3L, 2LB) [E] Economic principles and business methods applied to analyze firms and operations. Will utilize practical problem solving techniques for variety of management problems.

  
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    AGEC 2300 - Agricultural Marketing (3CR)


    (3L) An introduction to agricultural markets and marketing. Topics include the structure of United States agriculture, prices and marketing costs, government policy’s influence on marketing, effects of supply and demand on marketing, livestock and crop marketing, and risk management.

    Prerequisites: Sophomore standing.

Agricultural Technology

  
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    AGTK 1560 - Horse Hoof Trimming (1CR)


    (.5L, 1LB) A complete course in horse foot trimming, including the physiology of the feet and legs, unsoundness, hoof care, equipment and the actual trimming and shoe removal on live horses and mules.

     
    Offered once per year in the Fall semester.

    Prerequisites: none
  
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    AGTK 1570 - Horseshoeing (2CR)


    (1L, 2LB) (Max. 2) A complete course in horseshoeing, including the physiology of the feet and legs, unsoundness, hoof care, shoeing equipment, and the actual shoeing of live horses. Taught by a graduate of an accredited horseshoeing school.

  
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    AGTK 1580 - Introduction to Outdoor Recreation: Guide Outfitting (3CR)


    (3L) This course is designed to familiarize the student with the outdoor recreational guide industry. Emphasis will be placed on the use of horses and mules in the outdoor guiding industry. This course is meant to be a preliminary course to an actual hands-on Outfitting/Guide Curriculum.

  
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    AGTK 1590 - Packing and Outfitting (2CR)


    (0.5L, 3.5LB) A course dealing with the principles and techniques involved in the use of horses as a form of transportation on the ranch or in the wilderness. Covers equipment and general procedures used in packing.


Agroecology

  
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    AECL 1000 - Agroecology (4CR)


    (3L, 2LB) [E]  Introduces ecological interactions that affect food producing (agricultural) systems. Lectures and laboratory exercises study the various biological components and the science of sustainable agricultural production. Features differences between developed and developing countries. Explores crises and challenges facing agriculture and global society.

    Prerequisites: None
     

American Sign Language

  
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    ASL 1010 - American Sign Language I (4CR)


    (4L) This course will provide beginning level knowledge of American Sign Language, fingerspelling, deafness, and deaf culture. Emphasis will be on developing receptive and expressive language skills within the parameters of sign language using the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Language 5C’s to include: Communication, Culture, Connections, Comparisons and Community.

  
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    ASL 1020 - American Sign Language II (4CR)


    (4L) This course will provide intermediate level instruction in American Sign Language, fingerspelling, deafness, and deaf culture. Emphasis will be on developing receptive and expressive language skills within the parameters of sign language.

    Prerequisites: Successful completion (C or better) of ASL 1010 .
  
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    ASL 2030 - American Sign Language III (4CR)


    (4L) This course will provide advanced level instruction in American Sign Language, fingerspelling, deafness and deaf culture. Emphasis will be on developing receptive and expressive language skills within the parameters of sign language using the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Language 5 C’s to include: Communication, Culture, Connections, Comparisons and Community. This course will continue developing American Sign Language. Advanced vocabulary and ASL grammar will be taught and reinforced through classroom presentations and activities, cultural models and visual media presentation. Discussions will focus on deafness, deaf history, current trends and related topics. The direct experience method (using ASL with no voice) will be used to enhance language acquisition.

    Prerequisites: Successful completion (C or better) of ASL 1020 .
  
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    ASL 2040 - American Sign Language IV (4CR)


    (4L) This course will continue advanced level instruction in American Sign Language, fingerspelling, deafness and deaf culture. Emphasis will be on receptive and expressive language skills within the parameters of sign language using the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Language 5 C’s to include: Communication, Culture, Connections, Comparisons and Community. This course will continue developing American Sign Language. Advanced vocabulary and ASL grammar will be taught and reinforced through classroom presentations and activities, cultural models and visual media presentations. Discussions will focus on deafness, deaf history, current trends and related topics. The direct experience method (using ASL with no voice) will be used to enhance language acquisition.

    Prerequisites: Successful completion (C or better) of ASL 2030  or equivalent coursework.

Animal Science

  
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    ANSC 1010 - Intro to Animal Science (4CR)


    (3L, 2LB) Course covers the scope of the livestock industry with particular emphasis on breeds and types and management of beef cattle, sheep and wool, swine, dairy cattle, poultry and horses.

  
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    ANSC 1020 - Livestock Production II (3CR)


    (3L) Course covers fundamental principles of genetics and animal breeding, reproductive physiology, principles of nutrition, and digestion in domestic animals. Topics also include animal health and diseases, and grading and marketing methods of slaughter and feeder animals.

  
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    ANSC 1030 - Equine Management (3CR)


    (3L) [E] A basic course covering the equine industry, including classes and breeds, selection with form to function, care and management, conformation and unsoundness, health and diseases, reproduction, and feeding and nutrition.

  
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    ANSC 1100 - Artificial Insemination (1CR)


    (2LB) A complete course in artificial insemination, including class work in animal breeding, physiology, nutrition, and beef cattle management, as well as actual insemination work with animals.

  
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    ANSC 1130 - Equine Management II (3CR)


    (3L) A basic course covering the equine industry, including the history, care and management, reproduction, care and prevention of equine diseases, equine facilities and general equine practices.

  
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    ANSC 1150 - Animal Diseases (2CR)


    (2L) A survey of the diseases common to this area in cattle, sheep, and horses. Special attention is given to sanitation, prevention, control, and eradication of disease.

  
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    ANSC 1160 - Issues in Agriculture (3CR)


    (3L) Consists of investigations and discussions with respect to current topics in animal science.

    Prerequisites: None.
  
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    ANSC 1200 - Livestock Fitting and Showing (2CR)


    (1L, 2LB) Designed to provide students with the necessary skills to fit and show cattle, sheep, and swine. Emphasis will be placed on the clipping of feeder calves. This course is required for all students planning to exhibit feeder calves at the Arizona National.

  
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    ANSC 1210 - Livestock Judging I (3CR)


    (1L, 4LB) Comparative appraisal and selection of beef cattle, sheep, hogs, and light horses. Students will be chosen from this class to represent Casper College at regional and national judging contests.

  
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    ANSC 1220 - Livestock Judging II (Advanced) (3CR)


    (1L,4LB) Advanced study in the principles of livestock selection with emphasis on judging and giving reasons.

    Prerequisites: ANSC 1210 , or permission of the instructor.
  
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    ANSC 1470 - Livestock Practicum (3CR)


    (1L, 4LB) This course is designed to provide experiential learning with livestock management techniques. Areas of focus will include livestock handling and care; evaluation; classification and production of feedstuffs; terminology; care and prevention of illness; animal husbandry; market analysis; equipment management and care. Offered only in the fall

  
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    ANSC 2020 - Feeds and Feeding (4CR)


    (3L, 2LB) [E] Principles of animal nutrition with emphasis upon practical feeding of livestock. Particular attention is given to feeding livestock in relation to recent discoveries in nutrition, including the functions and importance of vitamins and minerals, and the necessity for proper quantity of protein rations of livestock. Economy in feeding emphasized throughout the course.

  
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    ANSC 2110 - Beef Production (3CR)


    (3L) A detailed study of the feeding, breeding, marketing, and pedigrees of all major breeds of beef cattle with emphasis on problems peculiar to the beef cattle industry in Wyoming.

    Prerequisites: ANSC 1010  and ANSC 1020 .
  
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    ANSC 2120 - Sheep Production (3CR)


    (3L) A detailed study of care and management of sheep flocks in the Western states, with particular emphasis on problems peculiar to the range sheep industry in Wyoming.

    Prerequisites: ANSC 1020 .
  
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    ANSC 2130 - Swine Production (3CR)


    (3L) Swine production in the United States including production of purebred and commercial swine: breeds, breeding, feeding, marketing, and management. Emphasis is on problems encountered in the production of swine in Wyoming.

    Prerequisites: ANSC 1010  or ANSC 1020 . Offered periodically.
  
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    ANSC 2230 - Livestock Judging III (2CR)


    (4LB) A concentrated study of livestock selection with major emphasis on team competition and national livestock shows.

    Prerequisites: ANSC 1220 , or permission of the instructor.
  
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    ANSC 2470 - Ranch Management Internship (3CR)


    (6LB) Supervised work and learning experience in ranch management related fields that are relevant to student’s desired areas of interest. 
    The internship provides an extension of the academic learning and includes the opportunity to: 1) apply substantial knowledge and skills gained in the academic setting in a supervised, professional work environment, 2) learn and develop new skills outside the classroom, and 3) explore a career field or prepare for a chosen career field through a work experience opportunity. The internship includes a collaborative team consisting of the student, faculty supervisor (course instructor), and a field (site) supervisor who develop acceptable learning objectives, experiences, and evaluation procedures which enable the student to work with in a professionals/mentoring setting. 

      Only offered in the Summer following completion of core Ranch Management Certificate courses.


Anthropology

  
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    ANTH 1100 - Introduction to Biological Anthropology (3CR)


    (3L) Presents basic concepts relating to the origin, evolution, biological nature, and adaptation of the human species.

  
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    ANTH 1200 - Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (3CR)


    (3L) [E] Using an ethnological approach, (comparative study of culture), this course surveys the basic concepts of cultural anthropology including cross cultural investigations of kinship, marriage, language, religion, politics, economics, and culture change.

  
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    ANTH 1300 - Introduction to Archaeology (3CR)


    (3L) Provides a background in archaeological theories and methods and explores the ways in which prehistoric material remains can provide an understanding of human behavior.

  
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    ANTH 2000 - Introduction to Linguistic Anthropology (3CR)


    (3L) [E] This course provides an introduction to anthropological approaches for understanding language use and interpretation within a social context.

  
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    ANTH 2210 - North American Indians (3CR)


    (3L) [E] A survey of North American Indian societies from prehistory to the present. Covers selected prehistoric cultural sequences as well as a general culture-area survey of known historic tribes and a consideration of current issues facing Native American groups.

  
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    ANTH 2475 - Independent Studies in Anthropology (1-3CR) (Max. 6)


    Provides opportunity for independent reading and more in-depth study in various fields of anthropology.

    Prerequisites: Previous anthropology coursework and permission of the instructor.

Art

  
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    ART 0200 - Convocation (0CR)


    (1LB) The participant will learn about the department programs, guest artist lectures, workshops, art gallery offerings, special topics courses and other opportunities at Casper College. Grading will be S/U.

    Prerequisites: Associate of Fine Art: Art Education, Fine Arts, Graphic Design, Photography majors and Associate of Art majors only.
  
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    ART 1000 - General Studio Art (3CR)


    (2L, 4LB) [E] General Art is an introductory art class for non-art majors designed to give a personal, improvisational, and welcoming art experience to everyone. Boost your skill set, leading to new adventures in work and creativity. A variety of media will be covered in this class including, drawing, ceramics, printmaking, and metalsmithing.

  
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    ART 1005 - Drawing I (3CR)


    (2L, 4LB) Introductory drawing emphasizing a wide range of drawing materials and methods of visual study. Fundamentals are stressed.

  
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    ART 1010 - Intro to Art (3CR)


    (3L) [E] A survey of the arts produced by humans from pre-history through contemporary trends. Emphasis on the basic elements of art and visual literacy through review of a variety of media and architecture. For non-art majors only.

  
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    ART 1110 - Foundation: Two-Dimensional (3CR)


    (2L, 4LB) [E] Studies and sequential exercises in the basic elements of design: shape, line, value, color, and texture. Exploration of the relationships of these elements with emphasis on composition.

  
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    ART 1115 - Digital Media (3CR)


    (2L, 4LB) An introductory course in the use of the Macintosh computer as a design tool to create and manipulate images and combine them.

  
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    ART 1120 - Foundation: Three Dimensional (3CR)


    (2L, 4LB) [E] In this course, students are introduced to the fundamental principles of three-dimensional design and their relationship to objects in space. This hands-on course emphasized creative problem solving, employs design strategies, and develops manual building skills. The relationship of the body to the built environment, narrative, and a greater correlation between object and concept are explored. This course encourages exploration, the exchange of ideas, and builds skills that can be applied to a variety of disciplines.

  
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    ART 1130 - Foundation: Color Theory (3CR)


    (2L, 4LB) [E] Studies and sequential exercises in color theory. Exploration of the relationships of hue, value, and chroma, studied in progressive exercises to enhance student’s awareness of color and its aesthetic relationships.

  
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    ART 1150 - Black and White Film Photography I (3CR)


    (2L, 4LB) A beginning course in still photography covering the operation of cameras and photographic equipment, processing of black and white films and prints, design and the history of photography. Assignments stress a variety of subjects emphasizing the fine art of photography.

    Prerequisites: ART 2245 Digital Photography I
  
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    ART 1160 - Black and White Film Photography II (3CR)


    (2L, 4LB) A continuation of ART 1150 covering advanced camera and darkroom techniques including the Zone System, manipulated processes such as solarization, multiple printing, photograms, and toning. Emphasis is on the fine print and art of photography.

    Prerequisites: ART 1150 .
  
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    ART 1300 - Museum Studies (3CR)


    (3L) The course provides an understanding of basic operations of a museum or gallery such as exhibit design, education, collections management, marketing, and an overview of the history and changing role of these facilities in society. The course also involves travel to Casper museums to explore their missions, services and collections.

  
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    ART 2005 - Drawing II (3CR)


    (2L, 4LB) Continuation of the principles of drawing, including contemporary esthetics and the human figure.

    Prerequisites: ART 1005 .
  
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    ART 2010 - Art History I (3CR)


    (3L) [E] A study of the visual arts produced by humans from prehistoric times to the Gothic Era. This course required for all art majors.

  
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    ART 2016 - Field Sketching (3CR)


    (2L, 4LB) This course presents the basic drawing skills needed to record accurate observations of the natural environment. These skills can benefit other visual art disciplines and/or serve as a foundation for drawing itself as a major discipline.

  
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    ART 2020 - Art History II (3CR)


    (3L) [E] A study visual arts and architecture produced throughout the world from the 13th - 18th centuries. Political, social, and economic factors relative to the visual arts will be considered. This course is required of all art majors.

  
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    ART 2023 - Collections Management (3CR)


    (3L) This course is a practical study of the duties of a museum collections manager, including the documentation, loaning, digitization, preservation, storage and care of collections.

  
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    ART 2025 - Women In Art (3CR)


    (3L) A general introduction to depictions of women in art from the earliest known artifacts produced by humans to understand how women were viewed in ancient societies, as well as women’s involvement in the visual arts from the Middle Ages to the present with emphasis on the 20th century. Questions that will be posed include: “how does gender affect art?” and “how do stereotypes of women affect viewing works of art?” Political, social, and economic factors will be examined in relation to women artists and their times to further understand artistic production.

  
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    ART 2035 - Art History III (3CR)


    (3L) A study of the visual arts produced throughout the late 18th to 21st century in Europe and America. Political, social, and economic factors will be considered as they affected artistic style.

  
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    ART 2073 - Introduction to Art Education (3CR)


    (3L) A survey of the history of art education focusing on influential 20th century educators, as well as discussion of contemporary theories in the field such as DBAE, Critical Theory, and Visual Thinking Strategies. This class will also focus on developing curriculum for the art education classroom with discussion of the stages of aesthetic development as well as assessment within an art course.

  
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    ART 2090 - Printmaking (3CR)


    (2L, 4LB) This course is an introduction to a variety of printmaking processes. Students explore new ways of creating imagery and surfaces unique to printmaking. Gaining expertise and control over a range of tools and materials will enable students to explore both consistent and variable editions. Students will study historical and contemporary approaches to printmaking by viewing historical and contemporary works. The course culminates in an editioned print portfolio exchange. (Fall semester.)

  
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    ART 2105 - Digital Design II (3CR)


    (2L, 4LB) Continued study of the Macintosh computer as a design tool to create and manipulate type and images and combine them.

    Prerequisites: ART 1110 , ART 1115 
  
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    ART 2110 - Typography (3CR)


    (2L, 4LB) [E] This course offers students a comprehensive introduction to typography through exploration and experimentation with letterforms and page layout for expressive communication. The course will cover the fundamental typographic principles, font recognition, and analysis of both historical and post-modern design theory. Emphasis will be placed on content, form and technique for effective use of typography in ads, posters, newsletters and other visual communications.

  
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    ART 2112 - Graphic Design I (3CR)


    (2L, 4LB) [E] Graphic Design is a communication of ideas using type and images. This course offers students a comprehensive introduction to the field of graphic design that stresses theory and creative development in discipline-specific information, hands-on practice, and an understanding of time-honored principles. Although graphic styles and the tools of the graphic design field are constantly evolving, the fundamental structures and principles of good design remain constant.

    Prerequisites: ART 1110 , ART 1115 .
  
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    ART 2125 - Graphic Design II (3CR)


    (2L, 4LB) This course examines complex and multi-faceted commercial design problems as a means of developing dynamic and innovative solutions. Design projects are analyzed according to their conceptual and graphic composition, and are developed to effectively and creatively communication a message to a specific audience. May be taken concurrently with Graphic Design Solutions.

    Concurrently: ART 2110 , ART 2112  and ART 1115 .
 

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